Old Barnwood Gry/Brown

Old Barnwood Gry/Brown

Post by Mark Woodwar » Tue, 26 Jan 1999 04:00:00



Hello, am making a project that will require a substantial amount of
coloring like old weathered barnwood.  Any suggestions for color mixing...or
should I just paint it?

Thanks
Mark

 
 
 

Old Barnwood Gry/Brown

Post by DBuck268 » Wed, 27 Jan 1999 04:00:00


<< Hello, am making a project that will require a substantial amount of
coloring like old weathered barnwood.  Any suggestions for color mixing...or
should I just paint it?

Thanks
Mark >>
Here's how I'd do it:
Make the piece out of a warm light gray color and sculpt lots of interesting
rough wood grain into it. After baking,clean it with rubbing *** and paint
on a watery mix of burnt umber darkened with black artist's acrylic. The wash
will settle into the grain lines and make them darker while leaving a nice tint
on the high points. Wipe off the extra while its still wet or if you want to
remove some color after it dries,use the ***.

Jody Bishel

 
 
 

Old Barnwood Gry/Brown

Post by DABla » Wed, 27 Jan 1999 04:00:00




Quote:
> Hello, am making a project that will require a substantial amount of

coloring like old weathered barnwood. . .

Hi Mark,

I have a file of various recipes I've saved for creating wood which I tried to
send to you (by Replying to your post).  The address is the same as above, but
it was bounced back by the gold ole Mailer-Daemon.  If you're still interested
in the recipes, drop me a line and we'll see if we can figure out the address
problem.

Diane B.

 
 
 

Old Barnwood Gry/Brown

Post by Nora -Jean Gatin » Thu, 28 Jan 1999 04:00:00


Mark:

"Making Doll's House Miniatures with Polymer Clay", by Sue Heaser, First
published in teh UK 1997 by Ward Lock, Wellington House, London,
http://www.cassell.co.uk, ISBN 0 7063 7590 4, page 27...

"Marbeling for Wood Grain

Make a 6mm (1/4") thick log, about 5cm (2") long, of the main color and logs of
equal length of the remaining colours. Press them together and roll into a long
6mm (1/4") thick log. Fold this into three and roll thin again. Continue folding
and rolling until the streaks of colour are 1mm (1/32") thick or less, but do
not continue too long or the clay will mix completely. Finially, fold into a
fatter log, for rolling flat or whatever the project requires.

When you use the wood grain clay, keep the streaks aligned longitudinally, just
like real wood grain, although the occasional loop looks effective."

Now, take that a step further for knots in the wood. What are knots in the wood
but bulls eyes, only smaller. Wouldn't it be possible to make bulls eyes with
the thinnest setting on the pasta machine. I did a nice three legged stool with
this method, sanded the top and bottom. My mistake was doing the legs after the
"log" stool. Next time those legs get cured first and jammed in the log stool. I
sure got tired of them falling over and getting bent.

The next experiment I am going to do with wood is to do a larger more ambitious
layering of thin pasta strips, roll me a thick old log. Core out some areas on
that log and insert reduced "branches" making me my knots in the wood. Cut
length wise. For is that not the way trees really are, rings running down the
trunk, cut length wise, knot only being the base of branches?

It looks good on paper anyway. So I'll keep ya posted.

One last thing, what about those wonderful ridges and gullies that weathered
wood gets? I figure some part of the wood is softer, and decays easier, it would
stand to reason that softer wood was the innards and the harder stuff was the
bark. Ok, then after a plank is cut off your trunk then score the lighter parts
with some clay tool, barring that I'd lay it on something textured to get
ridges, a bamboo sushi matt might be good.

So that's my story and I'm sticking to it.

Nora-Jean

Quote:

> Hello, am making a project that will require a substantial amount of
> coloring like old weathered barnwood.  Any suggestions for color mixing...or
> should I just paint it?

> Thanks
> Mark