Will they last a thousand years?

Will they last a thousand years?

Post by Carol V. Jaramil » Sat, 08 Mar 1997 04:00:00



So I'm asking the question about whether polymer beads have potential as a
collector's item in the next century or two.  And will the Indiana Joneses of
the future be digging them up on the North American continent?

Okay, anybody have any polymer clay items over five years old?  Ten?  Older?  
What kind of shape are they in?

This is a serious question.

Carol in Columbus

 
 
 

Will they last a thousand years?

Post by a » Sat, 08 Mar 1997 04:00:00


All the beads I made 4-5 years ago are fine....  However, other covered
things occasionally have cracked...  I have found that glass covered things
are the least to crack...  I used to cover rocks that I found on the
beach... CRACKED...  My metal neft lantern that I made for my husband....
CRACKED....  Even,  a clock that was made of all polymer... CRACKED...  I
do suspect, however, that allot of the cracking was due to the fact that I
did not condition well at the time...

What are other people's experience?

Suz



Quote:
> So I'm asking the question about whether polymer beads have potential as
a
> collector's item in the next century or two.  And will the Indiana
Joneses of
> the future be digging them up on the North American continent?

> Okay, anybody have any polymer clay items over five years old?  Ten?
Older?  
> What kind of shape are they in?

> This is a serious question.

> Carol in Columbus


 
 
 

Will they last a thousand years?

Post by shanean.. » Sat, 08 Mar 1997 04:00:00


I just want to tank all of you Calif. clayers for making my trip a fantastic experience! After all that traveling I couldn't sleep when I got home because input overload at the Clay Factory.

Thank you Jami for the ride and the tour!

I have to admit I was a little nervous traveling to a city I had never been to before 1500 miles from home only to depend on people I had met online and had never met. But...every single thing was perfect and went without a hitch.

Shane

 
 
 

Will they last a thousand years?

Post by Sherry Bail » Sun, 09 Mar 1997 04:00:00


I have dollhouse miniatures made of Fimo over 15 years old and they are fine,
no change noticible in them (Of course, they are stored in a "room box" so are
protected and not jostled much, and they ARE tiny, so not a lot of clay and
less likelihood of plasticizer residue in them than there would be in big
things.)

UV light is known to degrade polymer clay, though, unlike glass and ceramic --
so to be completely honest, I doubt that polymer clay will stand the test of
time like those materials or that archeologists will find much of it -- proper
storage might make the big difference. Or new formulations in the future.

Then again, I can only speak for myself, but I don't think I have made
anything so far I would be glad to know survived a couple of hundred years --
still learning, still growing. I destroyed all my student drawings with the
same attitude after art school. Things on a level of Kathleen Dustin's
gorgeous handbags or Pier Voulko's beads (just for two quick examples) will
probably be cherished and cared for, and those things have a higher chance of
archeological survival just because of that. But the intrinsic characteristics
of the material will require extra care.

Which I guess boils down to "it's hard to say"!

Sherry

 
 
 

Will they last a thousand years?

Post by polyart.. » Sun, 09 Mar 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
>Okay, anybody have any polymer clay items over five years old?  Ten?  Older?
>What kind of shape are they in?

   I have some little animal pins that I made in 1985.  They are holding little hearts that have printed "I Love You" with a technical pen (India ink).  They are finished (if I remember correctly) with Varathane.  They look like I made them yesterday.
   I did have a problem over the years with tiny ears, noses and legs coming off.  But that problem has been solved by re-attaching with zap-a-gap.  Now I glue little appendages before baking.

Susan in AZ

 
 
 

Will they last a thousand years?

Post by polyart.. » Sun, 09 Mar 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>I couldn't sleep when I got home because input overload at the Clay Factory.

Shane...
   You have described the thing I often get, but couldn't name "imput overload"  Just being in that area (I've lived all over San Diego County) is a pleasant *** of the senses.
   Sometimes I will get a book that has so much beauty and creativity to absorb, I must close it for awhile and take several sessions to study the work inside.

Susan in AZ

 
 
 

Will they last a thousand years?

Post by jjjj.. » Sun, 09 Mar 1997 04:00:00


Thank YOU Shane, for coming and sharing your polyclay experiences with us!  I don't usually sleep after Clay Day either, my mind is trying to process and keep track of way too much information!  It is incredible to see all of the different directions being taken by artists using polymer clay, an inspiring experience :-)  I am amazed that this medium attracts so many wonderful people, a fact that gets reinforced everytime I meet someone new!  

I love putting faces with the names, take care Shane!

Jami Miller

 
 
 

Will they last a thousand years?

Post by lynel.. » Sun, 09 Mar 1997 04:00:00




Quote:
>So I'm asking the question about whether polymer beads have potential as
a
>collector's item in the next century or two.  And will the Indiana
Joneses of
>the future be digging them up on the North American continent?

>Okay, anybody have any polymer clay items over five years old?  Ten?
Older?
>>What kind of shape are they in?

Polymer clay items 5 or 10 years old - probably.  Someone posted on AOL
that she had a set of beads that she made about 10 years ago and it was
still in good shape.
Judging by plastics in general, the odds are not good for a thousand years
- but then not many materials last that long except under special
circumstances (sealed away from sun, water, etc).
At the Smithsonian they have examples of early plastics from the start to
the middle of this century. There are displays explaining how they have to
preserve them very very carefully.  Plastics break down from ultraviolet
light (sunlight) and most of them eventually get enough ultraviolet to
make them fragile or to destroy them.  Also heat eventually degrades some
plastics, I don't know if that applies to all.
Lynelle
 
 
 

Will they last a thousand years?

Post by Klew » Tue, 11 Mar 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I just want to tank all of you Calif. clayers for making my trip a fantastic experience! After all that traveling I couldn't sleep when I

got home because inpu
Quote:

> Thank you Jami for the ride and the tour!

> I have to admit I was a little nervous traveling to a city I had never been to before 1500 miles from home only to depend on people I had met
online and had ne

> Shane****************************************************************:)

Shane, it was a delight to meet you too! A very nice surprise, everyone
has always been kind and receptive whenever I've had the opportunity to
go to "Clay~Day"! In reguards to the other comment...I call it "Sensory
Overload"...and presently am up at 3am with the infamous
"ART~ATTACK"...Be Well...Klew
 
 
 

Will they last a thousand years?

Post by Klew » Tue, 11 Mar 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> So I'm asking the question about whether polymer beads have potential as a
> collector's item in the next century or two.  And will the Indiana Joneses of
> the future be digging them up on the North American continent?

> Okay, anybody have any polymer clay items over five years old?  Ten?  Older?
> What kind of shape are they in?

> This is a serious question.

> Carol in Columbus*************************************************************************Well Carol, many of my family and friends have continued to joke about

this very subject...About 7 years ago, I began to make fishing lures at
the beginning of every season, and sell them by one of my favorite lakes
in the Sierra. How many do you suppose are at the bottom of this lake by
now? Now over the years the fishermen tell me the ones that got away
etc... and they come to choose a new lure, hoping it will be the one that
gets the BIG one!
Anyway, so when this lake is dry and becomes a dig site for some
archeologist, do you suppose they will determine the year by the layer of
polymer lures? One can only imagine what they'd say...Ha
...................And one can dream.....Klew
 
 
 

Will they last a thousand years?

Post by Ulrika O'Brie » Wed, 12 Mar 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>> Okay, anybody have any polymer clay items over five years old?  Ten?
>>Older?  

In my grandparents curio cabinet are several figurines I made
of plain old white Sculpey as a kid -- they're probably over
20 years old, now.  At last check they were still intact.
But, like Sherry's dollhouse stuff, they're quite small
and they've been stored in a sheltered environment, away
from direct sun, and not handled much.

--
"Criticism is the only known antidote to error." -- David Brin