recapturing old mold

recapturing old mold

Post by ELJAY » Mon, 12 Feb 1996 04:00:00



I have several custom plaster molds that have been used in ceramics and
are showing signs of wear.  
My idea is to use a Sculpy or equivalent  and create pressed castings of
the molds, resculpt them to correct defects that are starting to appear
and then make new molds.
Anyone with any experience who can help me will be appreicated.  Some of
my questions:  Do I need to coat the plaster mold surface with any release
material?
How do I reclaim the sculpy from the mold with minimum or no distortion.
 New topic:
Is there a forum for the use of urethanes for molds and casting?  where
can I find it, if it exists?
Replies can be here or direct.
Thanks.
Lee J. Maltenfort
There's no such thing as bad art.  I just can't say the same thing for
other people's taste.
 
 
 

recapturing old mold

Post by Ulrika O'Brie » Wed, 14 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>I have several custom plaster molds that have been used in ceramics and
>are showing signs of wear.  
>My idea is to use a Sculpy or equivalent  and create pressed castings of
>the molds, resculpt them to correct defects that are starting to appear
>and then make new molds.
>Anyone with any experience who can help me will be appreicated.  Some of
>my questions:  Do I need to coat the plaster mold surface with any >release
>material?
>How do I reclaim the sculpy from the mold with minimum or no distortion.

To minimize distortion of the Sculpey, I would cure the polyclay
in the mold, then unmold it.  Doing that would definitely require
some sort of mold release, preferably a dry one, or one that would
not evaporate under the oven temperatures required to cure Sculpey.
The only poly clay molding I've done has been with small pieces which
I was working back into after molding, so distortion didn't matter,
so I would strongly suggest practicing and experimenting on a
small mold you didn't care about (if need be, just make a mold of
some likely household item in a dixie cup or butter tub) to get
the technique perfected before moving on to the ones you're trying
to restore.  

I've yet to find a mold release that really makes me happy when working
with plaster, but perhaps someone here will have something to offer.

--Ulrika

--
On the other hand, the examined life isn't very lucrative.


 
 
 

recapturing old mold

Post by Jane Spauldi » Thu, 15 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Quote:


>>I have several custom plaster molds that have been used in ceramics and
>>are showing signs of wear.  
>>My idea is to use a Sculpy or equivalent  and create pressed castings of
>>the molds, resculpt them to correct defects that are starting to appear
>>and then make new molds.
>>Anyone with any experience who can help me will be appreicated.  Some of
>>my questions:  Do I need to coat the plaster mold surface with any >release
>>material?
>>How do I reclaim the sculpy from the mold with minimum or no distortion.
>To minimize distortion of the Sculpey, I would cure the polyclay
>in the mold, then unmold it.  Doing that would definitely require
>some sort of mold release, preferably a dry one, or one that would
>not evaporate under the oven temperatures required to cure Sculpey.
>The only poly clay molding I've done has been with small pieces which
>I was working back into after molding, so distortion didn't matter,
>so I would strongly suggest practicing and experimenting on a
>small mold you didn't care about (if need be, just make a mold of
>some likely household item in a dixie cup or butter tub) to get
>the technique perfected before moving on to the ones you're trying
>to restore.  
>I've yet to find a mold release that really makes me happy when working
>with plaster, but perhaps someone here will have something to offer.
>--Ulrika

A friend is a sculptor and owns a ceramic mold business.  She has used
her molds for polyclay and gave me a few tips.  She coats the mold
with laquer and then uses a dry mold release.  This makes the mold
unusable for ceramic, but works quite well for Sculpey/Fimo.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
>On the other hand, the examined life isn't very lucrative.