What's your best tip?

What's your best tip?

Post by LynnD » Mon, 17 Aug 1998 04:00:00



Just curious about what ya'll think is the best thing you've learned
during the past year.

For me there are so many things I've learned on this newsgroup that I
couldn't pick just one -- but there is one thing I learned all by
myself!

I've found a new way to smooth out the lumps and bumps on eggs,
vessels, and other shapes that I want completely smooth.  I have a
double-wheeled bench grinder, one wheel of which I use for buffing.  I
learned you can use the grinding stone, too (probably others already
do this, but it was serendipitous for me)!  It makes smoothing a
breeze--much easier than using a file or coarse sand paper!

Conclusion:  Laziness leads to resourcefulness (?)  :-)

So what's your Best Tip?

LynnDel

Warning:  Make sure you are awake and completely "with it" when you go
to buff your items.  I had one item ground, sanded through all the
stages, steel wooled, and ready to buff for the final shine.   So what
do I do?  I sleepily go to the wrong end of the bench grinder and
carve a big groove in it.   Eeeek!  It'll never be the same.

*"*-.,_,.-*"*  To e-mail me, remove the lie  *"*-.,_,.-*"*-

 
 
 

What's your best tip?

Post by BethCurr » Mon, 17 Aug 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>Just curious about what ya'll think is the best thing you've learned
>during the past year.

Gotta be, how to use a piece of glass or stiff plastic on the cane ends to
reduce distortion, including squeezing in the ends where they are attached to
the glass.  I wish I'd learned that tip before I made 30 inches of slightly
distorted knotwork cane <VBG>   For some reason I feel this crazed compulsion
to produce a 100% distortion-free cane.  Must be all that math in college.  It
hasn't happened yet, but I'm up to 95% with this technique

 
 
 

What's your best tip?

Post by DBuck268 » Mon, 17 Aug 1998 04:00:00


My favorite tip comes from Judi Maddigan and it really gets bubbles out of clay
sheets. When the clay is soft,roll it through at #4 and keep passing it
through,fold first. The trick is not to press the layers together at all,just
let them rest on the rollers. Let the rollers bring them together. Once the air
is all out, you can fold it and roll it through the bigger settings a step at a
time till it is thick again. Works great!

Jody Bishel

 
 
 

What's your best tip?

Post by ClayShay » Tue, 18 Aug 1998 04:00:00


Oh gosh... there are so many great tips, but I think the one I love the most is
the one that helps me with the Fimo conditioning.

First, I add a 1/2oz of white to every 2oz of color I use... both to brighten
the color and to offset any darkening that occurs in the baking, but also
because white is so much softer and helps soften the other colors. (The white
also acts as a visual guide to let me know that the clay has been well
conditioned.)
Second, I add a 1/2oz of MixQuick to that... to help soften.
Then I chop it all into small pebbles, using a little food processor, and dump
it into labeled ziploc baggies. It actually starts softening just a little
right in the bag... so by the time I need that color, I can just grab a chunk
out of the bag and it's a lot easier to finish the conditioning. (the food
processor mixes so evenly that if I run out of what I conditioned, I can just
grap another little chunk and continue... the color has always matched just
fine.)
I think(?) I might've gotten this tip from JJJJami... and I canNOT thank her
enough, because I REALLY love all the other fimo charactaristics sooooo much &
this has made it so much easier to work with!!!!

~~~~~~~~~Joanie :o}

 
 
 

What's your best tip?

Post by J J J Ja » Tue, 18 Aug 1998 04:00:00



Quote:

>I think(?) I might've gotten this tip from JJJJami...

Not me, Joanie baby, cuz I use Premo  --  my food processor is gathering dust
in the closet <VBG>

While I could probably fill a book with the information people have given me
over the years, I'd like to share a basic, but valuable tip from Z Kripke:

To make sure you are baking youir polymer clay correctly, make band-aid shaped
strips on a thin setting [#5] and bake.  When cooled, these strips should be
flexible enough to wrap around your little finger.  If they're brittle, you
probably need to bump up your temperature.  If your clay discolors, you need to
bump it down.  

Pre-heat your oven!  If you put a thermocouple, or a thermometer that will
register rapid changes in temperature in your oven and watch it, you will
notice that your oven may overshoot that 275F by 50-75F before it settles down.
 This is probably worst in toaster ovens.
Jami Miller

 
 
 

What's your best tip?

Post by P?rr? T?rr?n » Tue, 18 Aug 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>Conclusion:  Laziness leads to resourcefulness (?)  :-)

>So what's your Best Tip?

Haa !!!
A subject I love !

Best tip ? Hard to select, but lets see...

With claying technique that would be using cutters with polyclay sheets for
estimating the amount of colors when making colormixes. Its easier to
repeat "the master colors" <VBG> if having good enough recipe for that...

With getting new ideas that would be listening to different kinds of music
when claying and that way altering my moods. And to read this NG really
well to get "vibes" and new ideas from other polyholics.

With overall claying my best tip would definitely be "try everything and
give yourself a permission to make mistakes too".

P?RR?

(And I also have learned that sharing even the "smallest" and "oddest"
ideas and techniques can sometimes be the start of completely new
techniques !)

--
If I would have to choose between polyclay and chocolate
I would take polyclay.

http://www.dlc.fi/~markkujt/index.html

 
 
 

What's your best tip?

Post by kk » Tue, 18 Aug 1998 04:00:00


Best tip:

Use discarded gold or silver seed beads when making a showpiece large bead.
Use very thick guage fishing line, string seed beads on it, then form your bead
around it.  (Or carefully cut in half, make a trough, then reassemble over the
beads and finish the bead.

Why?  Because then whatever you string that bead on will not eventually wear
the bead down.  It provides a sturdy tunnel for the bead to move over without
damage and allows you to not have to use beadcaps, since you will have a nice
shiny "o" end to the bead.  (bugles can be used, but more precision is required
and I don't recommend them)

Kelly

 
 
 

What's your best tip?

Post by ClayShay » Tue, 18 Aug 1998 04:00:00


Good one Porro... that's one of my favorites as well!!!
I'd never heard the beading one though, Kelly... Thanks!!!

~~~~~~Joanie :o}

 
 
 

What's your best tip?

Post by ClayShay » Tue, 18 Aug 1998 04:00:00


<<<Not me, Joanie baby, cuz I use Premo  --  my food processor is gathering
dust
in the closet <VBG>....
.... make band-aid shaped strips on a thin setting [#5] and bake.  When cooled,
these strips should be flexible enough to wrap around your little finger.  If
they're brittle, you probably need to bump up your temperature.  If your clay
discolors, you need to bump it down.  >>>

Oh bummer... I hate to think I've fogotten whoever gave me that  lifesaver! I
also use a gooseneck lamp sometimes to warm up my clay bin before I go to work
with it.
So... with the tip you gave... were you referring to Premo in particular?
You're saying that cooking a little cooler results in more brittle finished
work... THAT was interesting!! I think I always bake a little on the cooler
side in the interest of caution. I may have to cut that out, YIKES!

 ~~~~~~~~Joanie :o}

 
 
 

What's your best tip?

Post by J J J Ja » Tue, 18 Aug 1998 04:00:00



Quote:

>So... with the tip you gave... were you referring to Premo in particular?
>You're saying that cooking a little cooler results in more brittle finished
>work... THAT was interesting!! I think I always bake a little on the cooler
>side in the interest of caution. I may have to cut that out, YIKES!

The class that Z gave us that tip in was a class taught in Fimo, years ago,
before Premo [would that be B.P.?!?!?!], but it has worked for me for every
brand of clay I have used.  Of course I had a little glitch when using this tip
with Cernit, because Cernit darkens in the oven NO MATTER what temp you cook it
at  --  as a function of its translucency.  Kris Richards gave me the corollary
to the baking tip:

Cernit will keep its pre-baked color if you mix 1 part opaque white to 3-6parts
colored clay.  I worked in 1/6 and it was perfect.  Without adding the white
some Cernit colors have an almost waxy look when baked, which some people don't
like.  I thought it was interesting.
Jami Miller

 
 
 

What's your best tip?

Post by Arant » Tue, 18 Aug 1998 04:00:00


Watch where you're going ;).  (Broken arms do nothing for clay time!)
     --Triche
 
 
 

What's your best tip?

Post by The Crafty Ow » Tue, 18 Aug 1998 04:00:00


Probably not new to the rest of you - but Marie Segal showed me how she
works out where to cut the sheet being used to wrap a cane - put the
sheet on the cane, roll it around to overlap, unroll a bit and there's a
line right where it overlapped, which is where you need to cut.

It's perfect and so easy and I never knew - I did it by overlapping and
cutting through the layers, which is not nearly so neat.
                   ___
                  <*,*>
                  {'-'}     The Crafty Owl
                  -"-"-

 
 
 

What's your best tip?

Post by Vince Rhe » Wed, 19 Aug 1998 04:00:00


My best tip especially for a newbie (includes me) is to read
rec.crafts.polymer-clay daily, check out the FAQs, check the links or
references that are given and most importantly find a friend who is either
like you or totally different, a newbie or a pro, the techie sort or the
artsy sort,  (Hi to Lyn of Lexington and Porro) just someone you relate well
to or who inspires you and then chat when you wish --- especially about what
clay projects you are working on.

Second tip---Get all sorts of magazines and look at pictures when you are
not particularly in the mood to create.  (Keep clay in the hands to warm and
condition at the same time and by the time you've finished looking at a
stack of magazines, you'll be inspired.)

Jeanne

 
 
 

What's your best tip?

Post by Polycla » Wed, 19 Aug 1998 04:00:00


Tip three - Go to craft shows.