Using Old Molds?

Using Old Molds?

Post by Sherry Bail » Sun, 09 Mar 1997 04:00:00



You should be able to use Pam as a mold release. (I haven't tried, but
logically there is no real reason it won't work.) But do think about what oil
does to wood molds -- might be ok, might not. Also, don't let the clay sit in
the mold too long, make the impression and remove it. The Oil could slowly
absorb into the clay and stick to the mold, especially the wooden ones where
the oil can penetrate the wood too. Potentially messy. (I wouldn't expect a
problem with make it and remove it, though -- just if you let it sit.)

Sherry

(PS If you do use talc, fluff it on with a makeup brush, it gives the coating
you need without piling up in the crevices.)

 
 
 

Using Old Molds?

Post by bobor.. » Tue, 11 Mar 1997 04:00:00


There is a specific mold release spray that you can buy almost anywhere
there are molds sold. It is a bit oily, but you just need the tiniest
spray for it to work. I think 3M has one.
Just ask for mold release spray.
peg polymer

 
 
 

Using Old Molds?

Post by Helen Fleisch » Tue, 11 Mar 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
>You should be able to use Pam as a mold release. (I haven't tried, but
>logically there is no real reason it won't work.) But do think about what oil
>does to wood molds -- might be ok, might not. Also, don't let the clay sit in
>the mold too long, make the impression and remove it. The Oil could slowly
>absorb into the clay and stick to the mold, especially the wooden ones where
>the oil can penetrate the wood too. Potentially messy. (I wouldn't expect a
>problem with make it and remove it, though -- just if you let it sit.)

The one time I tried using Pam as a mold release it glued the clay to
the mold instantly. Major mess. I wouldn't trust any oil as a mold
release now. I use cornstarch now, since it doesn't leave the visible
dust layer that talc does under glazing. I often use Future and have
never needed to buff that though it will shine more on stuff that has
been pre-smoothed, or if you use two or more coats. Often the matte
gloss of a single coat is what you want, though.

Quote:

>Sherry

>(PS If you do use talc, fluff it on with a makeup brush, it gives the coating
>you need without piling up in the crevices.)

So true! A soft makeup brush is a must-have for dusting molds.

Helen "Halla" Fleischer
Fantasy and Fiber Artist