Using CFC in Canes

Using CFC in Canes

Post by Need2Be » Sat, 28 Jun 1997 04:00:00



  Well, when I'm not distracted by other demands, I am a cane-maker who in
the past worked quite a bit with Fimo and preferred it in my canes.  What
I'd like to do is generate a useful discussion on using the new CFC in
canes.  
   What I've noticed, and other "Fimo" cane-makers have noticed, is that
Fimo is nice and "sturdy" in canes and reduces well.  CFC, however, seems
to get mushy and distorted.  Have any of you worked with CFC, and would
you share the "defeats" as well as the successful results with CFC, and
how you can best work with this new clay in canes?
   In my own experience, Fimo allowed you to work in very large canes
(dinner plate size), yet reduce quickly into a cigarette-size cane without
too much distortion.  Even though I worked with a MUCH smaller cane with
CFC, when I reduced, it "spread" and distorted, especially on geometric
shapes.
  On the other hand, I vastly prefer the colors of CFC, it's relative
softness, and the clarity and transparency of the Transparent, but I'm
terrified at the moment to do any more canes with just CFC for fear of
wasting the clay and the effort.  I look forward to your input,
---Need2Bead  

 
 
 

Using CFC in Canes

Post by Caneba » Sun, 29 Jun 1997 04:00:00


I have been doing some experimentation with CFC as well, and I have had
*** problems with the clay.  Let me preface this, though, by saying I
am positively WILD about the color selection, and I love the way it feels!
 I haven't had problems reducing, although I haven't as yet made any
really detailed or really large canes with this clay.  I have also noted
very little color change during the curing process, although there is
still a bit of a darkening- not enough to make a serious difference as far
as I'm concerned.

But I DO have major problems SLICING it!  It sems to want to "grab" the
blade, and I'm having a really hard time cutting clean, even slices.  I
have tried Marie Segal's trick of "snapping" the cane to break the surface
tension, I have tried refrigerating it, I have tried letting it sit
overnight, and it's still a problem for me.  I spoke to Donna Kato, and
she says she doesn't have the same problem.  However, Donna usually canes
with straight Sculpey lll, and I can't do that either!  I usually cane
with a mix of 2/3 Fimo to 1/3 Sculpey lll, which I personally find to be
perfect for the way I work. I would really like to switch to CFC, for a
number of reasons: 1) it's a breeze to condition, 2) it's American-made,
and 3) I love the colors (did I mention that already?)

I'm wondering if other Fimo or Fimo/Sculpey blend users are having more
problems than straight Sculpey folks?   Anyone?

Juli

 
 
 

Using CFC in Canes

Post by J J J Ja » Sun, 29 Jun 1997 04:00:00


I have no problems reducing CFC canes, and the only problem I have slicing
is when a large proportion of the cane is translucent    --  and I solved
that by letting it sit overnight.  I reduce my canes immediately after
building them and when I slice I use a sharp tissue blade and keep it
clean.

Switching to CFC from Fimo or Cernit is kind of like going back in time to
the days when you had problems with whatever clay you started working
with, you just have to learn new tricks to deal with the differences in
the clay.  I think that changing clays is about the same as changing
word-processors.  Sometimes the pain of change seems unbearable, but this
change will pay off in far less time spent conditioning and more time
spent creating :-)  Send Marie e-mail if you don't find the answers here
to help you make the transition, I'm sure she'll be able to help.

I reduce using the barbell method of squeezing the cane in my hand.  I
don't worry about keeping the cane round as I reduce and when I'm almost
done I round it out  --  I have very little distortion and I have reduced
plate sized [8" diameter] canes to ciggarette [1/4" diameter] without loss
of clarity or detail.  I have reduced square canes very small just by
alternately squeezing the sides and squaring it up when it's about the
right size.

<<I would really like to switch to CFC, for a number of reasons: 1) it's a
breeze to condition, 2) it's American-made, and 3) I love the colors (did
I mention that already?)>>
Juli, you've got all the bases covered!

Jami Miller

 
 
 

Using CFC in Canes

Post by BeadyEye » Sun, 29 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Juli - I, too, am a 2/3 Fimo, 1/3 Sculpy cane person!  I have been playing
with CFC quite a bit lately, though - I love the colors, too!  

About slicing problems - I do best on small stuff to use a half-razor
blade (a la Cynthia Toops), or on larger stuff, a Nu-blade, wiping them
down often to reduce drag. One tip I got from Michelle (Polyholic) is to
lightly press each end of the cane down on the slicing surface, stretching
it just a bit to break the surface tension.

I haven't made anything too complicated yet, but I do love the finish
after baking.  I hardly do any sanding, and tend to just buff things up a
bit on the leg of my jeans, and it feels like silk!

Off to play some more!

Aubrey

 
 
 

Using CFC in Canes

Post by Dorothy Mcmill » Mon, 30 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
>I'm wondering if other Fimo or Fimo/Sculpey blend users are having more
>problems than straight Sculpey folks?   Anyone?

>Juli

Hi Juli;

     I've been using straight CFC since it's first experimental stage and
have had very few problems with it.  I'm with you on the wonderful color
selection they now have.  And no more is red a problem when baked.  I
also don't find, so far, that the reds run, as I've had happen with Fimo.
  But, when it comes to slicing, I'm terrible no matter what clay I've
used.  However, I do think it is a bit more touchy than Fimo.  I always
let my canes sit overnight if possible, or even longer sometimes.  Then
if I still have trouble, I refrigerate.  I find I have to use a very new
sharp blade to get a good slice.  What I need -- what we all need -- is
one of Grove and Grove's fantastic slicing machines!  I would that that
would work with any of the clays.
      When I go to the Clay Factory's Clay Day next time I'll ask Marie
to sit and show me (us) just how she does her slicing and how it works
for her.  Maybe we can find a good trick to make it easier.
-

 
 
 

Using CFC in Canes

Post by Lynne Wardro » Mon, 30 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Hi gang -

I use CFC almost totally exclusively (I think I have about 3 blocks of fimo left in icky
colors that will never get used :/ )

I do a good bit of***, although I don't do dinnerplate size canes as someone had
mentioned.  I love my CFC (Just ask anyone in the Metro Detroit Guild - snicker)

As far as reducing, I've had very few problems since I tried the "wasp waist" method
that someone once described in this newsgroup.  Basically, from the center of the cane,
pinch in all the way around - just a bit - on a 2" diameter cane, I "wasp" it in about
1/4 to 3/8 " deep all the way around.  Then you expand the "waist" with a second pass
next to the original line.  Once you have about 1 1/2 -2" pinched in, you can start to
flow this reduction all the way to both ends.  Speaking of ends - you'll notice that the
ends are pushing OUT instead of sucking IN like when you roll the cane to reduce.  ONce
this happens, stop & do a little rolling & some just plane stretching of the cane to
equalize.  To stretch, stick one end to your surface & pull the other end & stick it
down too, stretching it along the way.

For rolling reductions on a cane that is over 4 inches long - CURVE the cane & roll or
towards 11 oclock with one hand & 1 oclock with the other - it stretches as it rolls.  
This works really really well.  I found out about this at our Guild retreat last year.  
One of the constantly running events was an assorted pile of clay videos (the better to
condition our clay to) - somebody in our merry band pointed out that in SOME of her
tapes, Tory is rolling canes in a slight curve.  We never heard her mention using the
curve, so we kinda thought it might be a subconcious thing.  I increase the curve over
what I saw on the tape - it works great.

For the record, I highly reccommend using a registration line - it has saved my sanity &
my cane more than once.

As far as the cutting issue - I had NO problems cutting when the weather was cool, but I
do now.  I'm a little puzzled by this myself since CA where the stuff was invented, is
generally warm.  Try cleaning your blade with *** - this helps sometimes (I have
found).  Other than that, leave the cane overnight in a cool place - I get much better
results that way.

Feel free to zap me a line if I can be of any help

Lynne

 
 
 

Using CFC in Canes

Post by Bob Par » Tue, 01 Jul 1997 04:00:00


: But I DO have major problems SLICING it!  It sems to want to "grab" the
: blade, and I'm having a really hard time cutting clean, even slices.  I
: Juli

        Abit more trouble, but worth it...leach the CFC if you need to cut
the finished product soon.  It's the plastisizer grabbing the blade.
Also, wipe your blade with a cloth often.
--
    ________________(to email remove preceeding hyphen)____________

 
 
 

Using CFC in Canes

Post by LynnD » Tue, 01 Jul 1997 04:00:00


On Sun, 29 Jun 1997 20:12:10 -0500, Lynne Wardrop

Quote:

>Hi gang -

>I use CFC almost totally exclusively (I think I have about 3 blocks of fimo left in icky
>colors that will never get used :/ )
....
>As far as the cutting issue - I had NO problems cutting when the weather was cool, but I
>do now.  I'm a little puzzled by this myself since CA where the stuff was invented, is
>generally warm.

Also, in CA, where the stuff was invented, air conditioning is
considered essential for life.  ;-)  I would bet that the insides of
most people's homes are 5-10 degrees cooler in the summer than in the
winter.  

I do all my polyclaying in an unairconditioned building, and cut all
CFC cane slices on canes that are *immediately* out of the freezer,
their full-time storage place.  Sometimes I have to wait a minute or
two before the slices get sticky enough to apply to whatever I'm
making (I usually cut about a dozen slices before using any of them,
leaving the slice standing where it was cut, and moving back the cane
a mite for the next slice.  It looks like a row of little dominoes).
On the rare humid day, I notice moisture condensation on the slices as
they warm up, but they air dry fast.

LynnDel
from central California
and who would like to live somewhere else when it's HOT

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
Remove 2 Z's from address to e-mail.

 
 
 

Using CFC in Canes

Post by Narigo » Sun, 06 Jul 1997 04:00:00


I had a terrible time with the one CFC cane I made, because the white was
so soft and I was making mostly pastel colors. Even after freezing, the
cutting the cane was like trying to slice a marshmallow. It just slipped
and slid and stuck.....I got terrible slices. I called CF and Howard told
me I should have leached the white. I haven't tried it again, but I have
several pounds of the clay, so eventually I will make something else and
see what happens. It was a disappointing first experience though.

Carol