Post your favorite tip

Post your favorite tip

Post by cgen.. » Tue, 25 Mar 1997 04:00:00



I thought instead of 'waiting' for problems/issues, that some of you
might be interested in posting your favorite tip-- a suggestion or
technique not found in most of the polymer clay books....

Here's mine (for newbies):
     In the process of learning to use PC, I accumulated tons of s***
clay--I mean tons.  Scraps and ends and such were flying!!!  Now I sort
my scraps by color when possible.  I got a 'blue' bag, a 'green' bag, a
yellow-orange bag, a purple bag etc.  When I get enough, I re-mix and,
voila, custom colors!!!

 
 
 

Post your favorite tip

Post by Sherry Roger » Mon, 31 Mar 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I thought instead of 'waiting' for problems/issues, that some of you
> might be interested in posting your favorite tip-- a suggestion or
> technique not found in most of the polymer clay books....

> Here's mine (for newbies):
>      In the process of learning to use PC, I accumulated tons of s***
> clay--I mean tons.  Scraps and ends and such were flying!!!  Now I sort
> my scraps by color when possible.  I got a 'blue' bag, a 'green' bag, a
> yellow-orange bag, a purple bag etc.  When I get enough, I re-mix and,
> voila, custom colors!!!

My favorite tip is to take some clay and chop it up pretty fine in the
food processor and then bake the crumbs about 5 minutes. This is enough
for them to remain kind of hard. Then I mix them into soft clay that is
a lighter color or at least contrasting. Then I roll it into a cane and
take slices to cover things. Because the crumbs have been cooked only a
little, they slice really easily so you have some of the pure crumb
showing at each slice as well as the shadows of the crumbs inside the
clay. This isn't a very good explanation, but it ends up looking like
stone. It's not an imitative technique, so I don't go for any particular
colors, I just make what I like. I made some really neat ones using
Sculpy Bronze mixed with gold leaf for the crumbs, and bronze mixed with
white to form sort of a cafe-au-lait color for the soft clay. I took
thin slices and covered beads formed with s***clay and used Future
Polish on them. If the crumbs are cooked too long, the blade will catch
on them and sort of pull them out of the soft clay instead of slicing
through them.
Sherry

 
 
 

Post your favorite tip

Post by caneb.. » Tue, 01 Apr 1997 04:00:00


Oh, cool!  What a great way to share "tidbits"!

Ok, here's mine...when I make a Bad Cane (or have largish chunks of distorted ends of canes, or even leftovers of colors I can't get apart),  I squish it flat and run it through the pasta machine,
then roll it up from the skinny end into a spiral, and reduce it as if it were a good cane.  I pile 'em all up at one end of my desk until I have a bunch, and then use them to make all sorts of new
canes with a kind of loose, free-spirit oil-paint-y look to them.  Or I cut slices off the squished-and-spiraled canes and layer them onto a flat sheet of clay, then cut out shapes with cookie
cutters for pins.

Just another way to keep from going bonkers when something goes awry!
Juli

 
 
 

Post your favorite tip

Post by Petunia » Fri, 04 Apr 1997 04:00:00


My favorite tip involves sanding.
I sand, then before going to the next higher grit sandpaper, I stick my
project back in the oven for about 10 minutes.  This seems to melt the
clay a little bit and it fills in the scratches the sandpaper has made.
This REALLY cuts down my sanding time.
-Deedee