Lost wax technique

Lost wax technique

Post by Joyce T » Wed, 22 Nov 1995 04:00:00



Quote:


>Subject: Lost wax technique
>Date: 21 Nov 1995 02:00:36 -0500
>Did anyone see the "TIP" in the Sept/Oct POLYinforMER about Lost Wax
>Technique?  It refers to incorporating bits of paraffin in your p-clay
>works before baking.  Then, when you bake, the wax melts and you are left
>with small holes or spaces in the piece.  
>My question is, what happens to the paraffin?  Does it simply evaporate
>into nothingness, or does it flow all over everything and/or make a mess
>in the oven?  I don't want to try it until I know what will happen, not
>having worked with paraffin before.
>marilyn

I may not be right about this, but I think the paraffin will burn off in the
oven, just like how wax in candles burn.  You may have to leave it in      
the oven for a longer time in order to burn away all of the wax.

Joyce

 
 
 

Lost wax technique

Post by Terezi » Wed, 22 Nov 1995 04:00:00


Did anyone see the "TIP" in the Sept/Oct POLYinforMER about Lost Wax
Technique?  It refers to incorporating bits of paraffin in your p-clay
works before baking.  Then, when you bake, the wax melts and you are left
with small holes or spaces in the piece.  
My question is, what happens to the paraffin?  Does it simply evaporate
into nothingness, or does it flow all over everything and/or make a mess
in the oven?  I don't want to try it until I know what will happen, not
having worked with paraffin before.

marilyn

 
 
 

Lost wax technique

Post by SFord7 » Thu, 23 Nov 1995 04:00:00


I think that you should melt out the wax on an absorbant surface like a
paper towel, not burn it out as in ceramics.  Wax is combustable but you
would risk damaging the piece and harmful fumes is it actually ignites.

Steven Ford
City Zen Caen

 
 
 

Lost wax technique

Post by Marion Margosh » Thu, 23 Nov 1995 04:00:00



 Wax will never burn out at the temperature you use to bake Fimo.  I
would not like to try it in a toaster oven! mbm

Quote:


>>Subject: Lost wax technique
>>Date: 21 Nov 1995 02:00:36 -0500
>>Did anyone see the "TIP" in the Sept/Oct POLYinforMER about Lost Wax
>>Technique?  It refers to incorporating bits of paraffin in your p-clay
>>works before baking.  Then, when you bake, the wax melts and you are left
>>with small holes or spaces in the piece.  
>>My question is, what happens to the paraffin?  Does it simply evaporate
>>into nothingness, or does it flow all over everything and/or make a mess
>>in the oven?  I don't want to try it until I know what will happen, not
>>having worked with paraffin before.
>>marilyn
>I may not be right about this, but I think the paraffin will burn off in the
>oven, just like how wax in candles burn.  You may have to leave it in      
>the oven for a longer time in order to burn away all of the wax.
>Joyce

 
 
 

Lost wax technique

Post by gwen bak » Tue, 28 Nov 1995 04:00:00


?have been away a while but some wax will burn off at about 200
degrees-there is a jewelers wax that is water soluble and should do this.
I have had it for-well since spring and have been too hectic to try it.
Hope someone gets a chance to try it and let me know.  I would think twice
about parafin since its petroleum refined stuff but what's our clay!!!

--
Gwen Baker

 
 
 

Lost wax technique

Post by Sherry Bail » Fri, 01 Dec 1995 04:00:00


Well, not all tips -- even the ones in PolyinforMer, are guaranteed to be
safe, smart, or effective -- caveat emptor, or something like that!  ;^)

Sherry

 
 
 

Lost wax technique

Post by CNJo » Sun, 03 Dec 1995 04:00:00



writes:

Quote:

writes:

> Wax will never burn out at the temperature you use to bake Fimo.  I
>would not like to try it in a toaster oven! mbm

It seems there is a lot of debate on how and even IF this lost wax
technique will work.  I have put my Fimo on the back burner to study for
upcoming tests, (sadly), but has anyone actually tried to do this?  What
were your results?  As soon as I get time, I will try it myself and let
you all know.  Carol.
 
 
 

Lost wax technique

Post by Kelly Kenist » Tue, 26 Dec 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
>> Wax will never burn out at the temperature you use to bake Fimo.  I
>>would not like to try it in a toaster oven! mbm
>It seems there is a lot of debate on how and even IF this lost wax
>technique will work.  I have put my Fimo on the back burner to study for
>upcoming tests, (sadly), but has anyone actually tried to do this?  What
>were your results?  As soon as I get time, I will try it myself and let
>you all know.  Carol.

Au contraire  (or however it's spelled) -- in Steven Ford's book, a
lost wax procedure IS mentioned, and a photo accompanies it, before
baking and after.   Sherry, didin't you SEE it????   page 56, upper
left...
 
 
 

Lost wax technique

Post by Sherry Bail » Wed, 03 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Hi, Kell!  Yes, I saw it, but I wasn't the one who didn't think it would
melt. (I have some questions about how WELL it would work, and I hope nobody
tries this without leaving a route to the outside for any melted wax (like
don't just roll chunks of wax up into a ball of clay and bake it, unless you
KNOW all the wax touches other clay until it hits the outside layer, or you
will trap wax inside the clay which might cause strutural problems and
bubbling, among other things.)

In true lost wax casting, though, the wax used has to be BURNED out at a
temperature high enough first melt and then essentially evaporate the wax --
lots hotter than Ford's technique calls for, which is simply to allow the wax
to melt and DRAIN out onto paper toweling or something.  I'll bet this is what
the other poster was thinking about.

True lost wax casting is used to make a negative mold into which metal is
poured to make the positive image. I haven't thought of any way *I* would use
wax with clay to make use of the negative shapes you would get from letting
the wax melt out of the clay, though.  I can see a kind of swiss-cheese effect
that doesn't grab me, and that's about it. (I'd love to hear of any ideas
other folks have come up with for making use of the holes!)

Sherry