Discussion: Work or Fun? Are you a "Pro" or a "Hobbiest"?

Discussion: Work or Fun? Are you a "Pro" or a "Hobbiest"?

Post by Chuck Holco » Mon, 12 Aug 1996 04:00:00



[Note: this thread has been started on rec.crafts.carving,
rec.crafts.dollhouses, rec.crafts.misc, rec.crafts.polymer-clay, and
rec.crafts.***stamps, although not cross-posted to them, if anyone
else is interested in responses to it.]

In a recent e-mail discussion , I was again struck by the reasons why
I make an effort to NOT sell the fruits of my many hobbies for gain:
it takes the fun out of it and makes it *work* rather than FUN.

I was recently asked (for the ump***th time) why I didn't make things
to sell for a living. As always, I patiently tried to explain to the
person that my *hobbies* are for fun, and that to do them for profit
makes them WORK, and therefore takes the fun out of them. They didn't
get it. She *was* happy to accept the soapstone sculptures I made for
her, though! ;)

I see a huge difference between sitting down before my workbench and
whittling on a piece of wood, sculpting a piece of stone, clay or
silver, making a knife, stamping out a Get Well card, or making a
miniature rocking chair - to *give* to someone, and doing it to *sell*
to someone. On the one hand I am performing a favor, an act of
generosity in the giving and love in the making. On the other hand, I
am performing an act of pure commerce - supply and demand.

I've read numerous articles where people are crowing about how lucky
they are, "to be able to get paid to do something I love." Now my
question is this: for those of you who do your crafts for a living, as
opposed to doing it for relaxation, fun, or simply for the joy of
creating and giving; is the magic still there? Is it as much fun to
*HAVE* to dedicate 4 or 6 or 10 hours a day to your craft(s) as it was
when you did it when you wanted to, or when the spirit moved you?

As a basis for comparison, I have 2 experiences to adjudge *my*
personal feelings on the subject: my brief forays into the "business"
end of writing and jewelry-making. Both of these are things that I
ENJOY doing. Both of them I decided to make my livelihood. I had
dismal success with actually selling my writing, but pretty good
success in selling my jewelry. However, I was turned off from both of
them...for YEARS, simply by making them something I HAD to do, on a
daily basis. The magic was indeed gone.

Any similar experiences? Comments?

-
Chuck Holcomb

+
"8 out of 10 people suffer from hemorrhoids...the other 2 enjoy them..."

+

 
 
 

Discussion: Work or Fun? Are you a "Pro" or a "Hobbiest"?

Post by Networ » Mon, 12 Aug 1996 04:00:00



writes:

Quote:
> Now my question is this: for those of you who do your crafts for a
living, as
>opposed to doing it for relaxation, fun, or simply for the joy of
>creating and giving; is the magic still there? Is it as much fun to
>*HAVE* to dedicate 4 or 6 or 10 hours a day to your craft(s) as it was
>when you did it when you wanted to, or when the spirit moved you?
>. The magic was indeed gone.

>Any similar experiences? Comments?

Hi Chuck,

I totally agree with you.  Anytime I'm making something to give away I
have much more fun with it because it's usually a one-of-a-kind, made just
for that person, thing.  It's a challenge, because I've never don't it
before.  I love making gifts because it's something I *want* to do.  I
cringe everytime I get an order, because I really don't enjoy repeating a
design and it's something I *have* to do.  I know, I know...I don't have
to do anything I don't want to but I'm always so flattered that a shop
owner likes my stuff enough to take a risk on it that I don't know how to
say no.  Then to have it actually sell for at least twice as much, makes
it that much better!  What an ego boost!

My family/friends have about reached saturation level on my stuff.  They
would rather have an expensive gold necklace, or Craftsman tool,  than
another clay something from me.  I know I'm not alone when I say that my
family doesn't appreciate my talents nearly as much as other folks do.
So, I sell in order to buy really special gifts for them.

Partial Solution:
I organized a Polymer Clay Birthday Club last year (16 FANTASTIC people,
from all over the country, and New Zealand, swapping polymer birthday
presents) so that I can give (and get!) something polymer to people that
truly appreciate it.  It has been a wonderful experience because, not only
do I get 15 WONDERFUL presents on my birthday, but the people connections
that I've made are priceless!  I have formed some really special
friendships because of it.

But to answer your question more simply....
yes the magic is not there if I'm selling it.

Nancy in Atlanta

 
 
 

Discussion: Work or Fun? Are you a "Pro" or a "Hobbiest"?

Post by Mike Buessele » Mon, 12 Aug 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> "8 out of 10 people suffer from hemorrhoids...the other 2 enjoy them..."

What I want to know, Chuck, is where do you come up with these
little jewels at the end of your posts?  They are my favorite
reading.  Like "The more you run over a cat, the flatter it gets."
Priceless.

Mike

 
 
 

Discussion: Work or Fun? Are you a "Pro" or a "Hobbiest"?

Post by SHANEANG » Mon, 12 Aug 1996 04:00:00


Okay Chuck here it is.

Obviously, I love my 'work'. I would rather do this as my work more than
anything else. I consider myself very lucky to have this custom made 'job'
made for me, by me.

Unlike some people, I have to make money to help support my family of 6. I
have waited tables, cleaned hotel room toilets, delivered phonebooks and
flipped burgers. At one point in my career search I ended up in a high
tech computer chip factory. I held the title of Assembly Process
Engineering Specialist, where, pregnant with my 4th child I was sobbing in
my car in the parking lot trying to muster up the energy to work my 5th,
10 hour shift of the week while my twin boys were sick at home with a
strange babysitter. Things had to change before I went insane.

I too struggled for a time to make my art pay, it HAD to pay, because if
it didn't I would have to go back to that hell where people are treated
like cattle and kids grow up in daycare centers. Where batchlor bosses
tell you your family is interfering with the job.

I always wanted to be an artist when I grew up. No matter what job I was
doing at the time I always had paint, polyclay or a sketchpad in my life.

Art for money in my opinion is just as nice as art for no money if you can
afford it. I respect your choice not to sell your work and you are
fortunate indeed to be able to create at your leisure. Personally, I do
both. I create for fun and the joy of it. I have things I've made I would
never sell or I make things to give away for a good cause, because now
that I've achieved some sucess in art,  those things are even more
valuable to those who recieve them and more valuable to me because I can
now afford to keep them if I want to.

I am in control of my own destiny here, finally. If something gets to be a
drag I pay someone else to do it. Someone who would love to do it. I treat
them like I would like to be treated. If they want to stay home with their
family there are no questions asked. If they don't want to be here then I
don't want them here.  They work as much or as little as they want. There
are no set hours unless a show dictates that we must be there. So the
people who work for me are also in control of their lives. You know what?
They work like dogs because they want to just like I do.

So now, if you will excuse me I need to exit my huge polyclay studio and
change out of my bathrobe into something decent because I'm volunteering
at our little mountain gallery this afternoon. This is the same gallery
where one of my paintings auctioned off last weekend for 280.00 for a
local relief fund for a flooded local town. I will drive down the little
mountain road, along the S. Platte River and look to see if the bald
eagles are back for the winter yet. Then I think I'll bring along stuff to
make polyclay pens while I'm at the gallery and fill the hummingbird
feeder there. I suppose my kids will swim in the lake while I'm gone.
Tomorrow is a work day making angels. Life just doesn't get any better
than this.

Shane

"Farmer Hogget knew that little ideas that tickled and nagged and refused
to go away should never be ignored, for in them lie the seeds of destiny."
From the movie 'Babe'

 
 
 

Discussion: Work or Fun? Are you a "Pro" or a "Hobbiest"?

Post by Vickie Limpar » Mon, 12 Aug 1996 04:00:00


Hi Chuck,

Being a workaholic I have to be busy, which was a real pain during the 4
hour power out yesterday, but I have to say I really love my work. Since
I'm primarily mail-order I take orders in my pajamas with 4-6 dogs lying
around me and just don't think life could get any better. I have 2 main
passions in life-  dogs and computers and I am fortunate enough to have a
business that encompasses both. My hubby is a great source of inspiration
and humor and I don't know what I'd do without him either because we have
fun. We both work out of our house so we can brainstorm anytime we want.
I'm not doing the same thing all the time so there is plenty of variety
and even though I was making lots of Christmas stockings today - they
weren't all the same design on them so I took great delight in each one of
them. The fact that I get paid to do something which brings me such
delight makes it all the better. I do make the one-of-a-kinds for friends
and family which is really nice too and they always know that they have a
"special" whatever and appreciate it all the more. I love being my own
boss, I love getting dressed at 3 in the afternoon if I feel like it and I
love the fact that my morning commute consists of getting through about
900 pounds of dogs to get to the backyard to start the day off with a
rousing game of fetch while I drink my first cup of coffee. Yep, it
doesn't get much better than this :-)

Vickie

--
Doggie Diamonds                 Custom Products for the Dog Lover
Choose from 350+ poses to put on over 80 products in 110+ breeds.
                 See our home page on the WWW at
          http://www.primenet.com/~gillett/ddhome.html

 
 
 

Discussion: Work or Fun? Are you a "Pro" or a "Hobbiest"?

Post by Chuck Holco » Tue, 13 Aug 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>rousing game of fetch while I drink my first cup of coffee. Yep, it
>doesn't get much better than this :-)
>Vickie

Just one thing to say to this, having just read Shane's reply:

Quote:
>Tomorrow is a work day making angels. Life just doesn't get any better
>than this.
>Shane

;) - You are indeed the fortunate ones.
-
Chuck Holcomb

+
Ted Kennedy's bumper sticker: "My other car is under water"

+

 
 
 

Discussion: Work or Fun? Are you a "Pro" or a "Hobbiest"?

Post by Chuck Holco » Tue, 13 Aug 1996 04:00:00


Quote:


>> "8 out of 10 people suffer from hemorrhoids...the other 2 enjoy them..."

>What I want to know, Chuck, is where do you come up with these
>little jewels at the end of your posts?  They are my favorite
>reading.  Like "The more you run over a cat, the flatter it gets."
>Priceless.

Heheh...I've got a pretty good collection that I've assembled, over
the past 4 or 5 years online. Some I've "borrowed" from various
sources, some are originals. Glad you enjoy them.
-
Chuck Holcomb

+
Ted Kennedy's bumper sticker: "My other car is under water"

+

 
 
 

Discussion: Work or Fun? Are you a "Pro" or a "Hobbiest"?

Post by Chuck Holco » Tue, 13 Aug 1996 04:00:00


Hi Shane,

Quote:
>Obviously, I love my 'work'. I would rather do this as my work more than
>anything else. I consider myself very lucky to have this custom made 'job'
>made for me, by me.

Okay, I can see that aspect of it. I mean, I would simply *love* to
have to do nothing all day except to craft. But I know, in my
heart-of-hearts, that it would ruin a lot of my hobbies for me.

Quote:
>I too struggled for a time to make my art pay, it HAD to pay, because if
>it didn't I would have to go back to that hell where people are treated
>like cattle and kids grow up in daycare centers. Where batchlor bosses
>tell you your family is interfering with the job.

I can see that there is a lot of bitterness attached to the subject
for you...My point wasn't so much "*can* you make it pay"...that
wasn't a problem for me...it was "do you *enjoy* making it pay?" But I
can see how you have approached it - "This is my job, this is what I
do. I have chosen a job that I enjoy, rather than to take something
that I enjoy and turned it into a job." That may be an important point
for people who want to start a career in crafts.

ie. Don't try to take something that you enjoy doing and turn it into
your job. Rather, look at the things that you *might* do, and choose
one of them, which you can enjoy, for your job.

Quote:
>Art for money in my opinion is just as nice as art for no money if you can
>afford it.

I don't think the relative "niceness" enters into it. I mean, I'm not
judging the merits of someone's commissioned work over their "free"
work or hobby work. I'm asking about the _joy_ they receive, compared
to the $$ they receive. Do they balance each other out? Is it worth it
to compromise one's hobby for the sake of money? In your case, it has
been a matter of necessity, which I can respect and understand.

Quote:
>I respect your choice not to sell your work and you are
>fortunate indeed to be able to create at your leisure.

Well, I don't think anyone is really *compelled* to craft for money. I
mean, it *is* a choice that one makes. I _could_ sell if I wanted to,
but I would really rather pursue other things that I _don't_  enjoy so
much, just so I will still have the things that I like to do to fall
back on for relaxation. Although, at this point, I have so MANY
hobbies and crafts that I do, that it seems like I could sacrifice one
or more of them to make a living off! :)

Quote:
> Personally, I do
>both. I create for fun and the joy of it. I have things I've made I would
>never sell or I make things to give away for a good cause, because now
>that I've achieved some sucess in art,  those things are even more
>valuable to those who recieve them and more valuable to me because I can
>now afford to keep them if I want to.

Exactly my point. So in your case, you *are* able to separate the
business of polyclay from the creativity of polyclay, so you can still
enjoy working with it.

-
Chuck Holcomb

+
Ted Kennedy's bumper sticker: "My other car is under water"

+

 
 
 

Discussion: Work or Fun? Are you a "Pro" or a "Hobbiest"?

Post by Eileen Morg » Tue, 13 Aug 1996 04:00:00


Quote:
>In a recent e-mail discussion , I was again struck by the reasons why
>I make an effort to NOT sell the fruits of my many hobbies for gain:
>it takes the fun out of it and makes it *work* rather than FUN.

I read your post with great interest as I am just now thinking of
turning some of my hobby into a small "empire"!  

Up until now, I would have totally agreed with all your statements.
However, at this time in my life, I am unable to go out to work
because of a medical condition and spend a lot of time crafting.  I
love making various dollhouse accessories.  I have completed one
dollhouse (can one ever complete a dollhouse? <g>) and furnished it
with various things I have made.  I do want to make another dollhouse
for myself, and again finish it with things I like to make.  However,
I am considering making some extra things that I will take down to a
new hobby store, putting on my very best saleswoman hat, to discuss
selling some of these small items to him for re-sale.  

I don't want to turn my hobby into work, but how many  fimo oranges,
bunches of grapes, pies, loaves of bread, etc., does one person need?
I can quite enjoy myself for hours on end creating baskets of fruit,
***y roses, etc., and I don't feel I will be encroaching on my hobby
by attempting to sell some of them.  It will give me a little pin
money to help us through a somewhat stressful time financially.   And
when I look at what is available in the regular maketplace -
mass-produced plastic pies, four potatoes in a bag (at least I think
they were potatoes!), and the prices they are selling them for, I just
shudder.  I would like to be able to share some of my creativeness and
talent with other miniaturists who are perhaps unable to produce the
quality (and life-likeness) that I can.

I do many, many different types of crafts, miniatures being a very big
part of it and the only one that I see a potential for making a bit of
money at.  Cross-stitch, sewing, crocheting, etc., are all too labour
intensive to consider as business ventures, simply because I don't
work for $.50/hour!

In closing, I do totally agree with your philosphy of keeping our
hobbies as hobbies, but there are times when I feel one can turn part
of the enjoyment of the hobby into a prospective income  without
losing any of the fun of the hobby.  

--
* A miniaturist needs fimo-therapy"

 
 
 

Discussion: Work or Fun? Are you a "Pro" or a "Hobbiest"?

Post by Caneba » Tue, 13 Aug 1996 04:00:00



writes:

Quote:


Holcomb)
>writes:
>> Now my question is this: for those of you who do your crafts for a
>living, as
>>opposed to doing it for relaxation, fun, or simply for the joy of
>>creating and giving; is the magic still there? Is it as much fun to
>>*HAVE* to dedicate 4 or 6 or 10 hours a day to your craft(s) as it was
>>when you did it when you wanted to, or when the spirit moved you?

I was thinking of not responding to this question, simply because Sherry
has already started a similar conversation, but I felt I needed to offer
the "other side" point of view.  I do sell my work, and I love what I do.
Sometimes it IS work, and there is something else I'd rather be doing at
that particular moment, but I am utterly enamoured of this medium and
don't care WHAT I am doing, as long as it is in my hands!  I never feel as
though I HAVE to be doing it, it is a tremendous thrill for me to know
that there are other people out there who enjoy what I do enough to pay
money for it.  It e***es me every time the phone rings with another
order.  I have always been the "artsy-craftsy" type, as my mom calls it,
but this is the first thing I have ever done that has captured my
attention so thoroughly.

I love it! (Did I mention that already?)
Juli

 
 
 

Discussion: Work or Fun? Are you a "Pro" or a "Hobbiest"?

Post by The Dawnwich Horr » Tue, 13 Aug 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>As a basis for comparison, I have 2 experiences to adjudge *my*
>personal feelings on the subject: my brief forays into the "business"
>end of writing and jewelry-making. Both of these are things that I
>ENJOY doing. Both of them I decided to make my livelihood. I had
>dismal success with actually selling my writing, but pretty good
>success in selling my jewelry. However, I was turned off from both of
>them...for YEARS, simply by making them something I HAD to do, on a
>daily basis. The magic was indeed gone.

I have been wondering this too.  I have spent many years in trying to go
pro with my writing, and now I find it almost painful to write.  I've
been considering trying in another field, and I've been wondering if I
would take something else that I love and turn it into something that I
can barely stand to think about.

It's interesting that you were also turned off of jewelry making.  I've
been wondering if it was primarily the state of the present day fiction
market and the narrowness in my particular field of interest that caused
the problems that I had.  Yes, I've had a few pro sales but they were
enormously difficult to get and didn't bring much pleasure.  There are
really only ten to twenty people in the world who professionaly publish the
sorts of thing that I want to write, and so I spend an inordinate amount
of time trying to impress a very small pool of markets.  For a book or a
magazine, you have one person buying for ten thousand people.  It's been
tempting lately to think that those ten thousand people would buy ten
thousand earrings, and if nine thousand of them think my work is ugly
then I can still aim at the ones who don't.  There doesn't seem to be a
huge glut of wannabe jewelry craftsmen, at least not like there is of
wannabe authors, not like there are a thousand candidates for each
potential sale like there is in fiction.

I hope that more room for success would mean less room for bitterness.  
When I like to do something, I like to do it right.  I spend hours on
what I am doing.  I don't like things to be quick and easy.  It's very
difficult for me to find the time to work on my projects and finish them
at the quality that I aspire to.  Having the goal of turning pro makes it
easier for me to dedicate the time and energy and materials to my
projects.  I need to have a goal and a dream -- I hope that I can have
that while I can keep some of the fun and relaxation.  My day job is more
pleasant than Shane's was, and it pays better, but I still feel like I
sold my life for a series of McDonalds Happy Meals.  I itch constantly.  
I don't want to sit still.  Maybe I would feel the same way if I were
doing something I loved full time?  Certainly, I didn't choose my current
occupation out of a hat - this was something that I enjoyed and that I
was good at.  All of my first hand evidence would lead me to believe that
doing something full time turns it into a chore.  Those sort of doubts
have made me reluctant to try it again, but I keep thinking about it, so
I might make the experiment again.  I'm not ready to give up on writing
yet, and I'm not good enough to take a stab at turning pro at jewelry or
dollmaking yet (I still have a lot to learn) so I'll keep mulling over
this for a while.

Thank you for bringing the subject up.  It's done my heart good to hear
from people who are doing it.  And in the meantime I am enjoying having a
hobby that doesn't bring any external pressure with it.

Dawn

--
Dawn Albright

Angelus Press: http://www.greyware.com/Angelus

 
 
 

Discussion: Work or Fun? Are you a "Pro" or a "Hobbiest"?

Post by Rand Sta » Tue, 13 Aug 1996 04:00:00


If we make a living at what we love to do -- excellent, and we should be
pleased to be so fortunate.  If we do not, if we have to work at other
things, but still do what we love to do because we have to, want to, need to
-- then that is just as wonderful, because we are doing that which we were
meant to do.

Perhaps a good thing to remember is that the selling  of anything
does not really mean anything.  Sales, or the lack thereof, does
not place an intrinsic value on the quality or artistry of what we do -- only
time and the heart can do that.  There were many "artists" who were great
sellers in their time that no one even knows today, while others like Vincent
Van Gogh couldn't sell anything except to family.  It did not lessen the
beauty or artistry of what he did merely because no one in his time bought it.

We seem to feel it necessary to pigeon-hole each other with the label "Pro",
"amateur", "artist", "hobbyist", etc.  I feel we should merely do what we do,
share what we can, sell or not as we choose or are able, and leave the labels
for others to play with.  The quality and artistry of the work is what counts.

IMHO

Rand

 
 
 

Discussion: Work or Fun? Are you a "Pro" or a "Hobbiest"?

Post by Chuck Holco » Wed, 14 Aug 1996 04:00:00



Hi Dawn,

Quote:
>I have been wondering this too.  I have spent many years in trying to go
>pro with my writing, and now I find it almost painful to write.

Mmmm, I know *exactly* what you mean. Fortunately, I stopped before I
completely ruined it for myself. I no longer write fiction, but I
don't mind writing articles, technical pieces, etc. My sister, OTOH,
has been writing poetry for the past 20 years, and has just this year
started sending it out, and almost immediately started getting
published in small press, and is now selling to the commercial market
as well!

Quote:
>I've
>been considering trying in another field, and I've been wondering if I
>would take something else that I love and turn it into something that I
>can barely stand to think about.

Apparently, there *is* that danger.

Quote:
>It's interesting that you were also turned off of jewelry making.  I've
>been wondering if it was primarily the state of the present day fiction
>market and the narrowness in my particular field of interest that caused
>the problems that I had.  

Heheh...I don't know. A LOT of people send mss around for *years* with
nary a nibble, and they turn out to be best-selling authors, when they
finally get their break. I've read tale after tale of the very same
thing happening.

Quote:
>Yes, I've had a few pro sales but they were
>enormously difficult to get and didn't bring much pleasure.

Not much fun in that.

Quote:
> It's been
>tempting lately to think that those ten thousand people would buy ten
>thousand earrings, and if nine thousand of them think my work is ugly
>then I can still aim at the ones who don't.  There doesn't seem to be a
>huge glut of wannabe jewelry craftsmen, at least not like there is of
>wannabe authors, not like there are a thousand candidates for each
>potential sale like there is in fiction.

True, and you don't have the level of competition that you do with an
editorial staff...unless, of course, you're attempting to sell at
juried shows.

Quote:
>I hope that more room for success would mean less room for bitterness.  

See, for me it wasn't really bitterness. I guess I'm just not a bitter
person. I mean, I was *disappointed*, and sometimes annoyed, and I got
sick of doing the work, but I was never bitter, really. I had made the
choice myself, so I didn't really think that I had any right to be
bitter about it.

Quote:
>When I like to do something, I like to do it right.  I spend hours on
>what I am doing.  I don't like things to be quick and easy.  It's very
>difficult for me to find the time to work on my projects and finish them
>at the quality that I aspire to.  

Exactly one of my problems. I can never charge enough for my work to
recoup my investment in _time_.

Quote:
>Having the goal of turning pro makes it
>easier for me to dedicate the time and energy and materials to my
>projects.  I need to have a goal and a dream -- I hope that I can have
>that while I can keep some of the fun and relaxation.

See, I wouldn't feel right selling pieces for a pittance, that I had
spent weeks or even months making. For me, to be able to do it for a
living would also ruin it because I would have to compromise
*quality*, which is something  that I refuse to do.

Quote:
> My day job is more
>pleasant than Shane's was, and it pays better, but I still feel like I
>sold my life for a series of McDonalds Happy Meals.  I itch constantly.  
>I don't want to sit still.  Maybe I would feel the same way if I were
>doing something I loved full time?

I really don't know. *I* have had that experience, but apparently
other people have had better luck at it than I. That's one of the
areas I'm trying to explore with this discussion. Interestingly
enough, as a sidebar: I've had very good response here, in
rec.crafts.dollhouses, and pretty fair response in rec.crafts.misc,
and even rec.crafts.carving,  but *zero* response with the stampers!
Not one person has taken the time to respond with their 2-cents, and I
*know* that there are pro stampers over there.

Quote:
> Certainly, I didn't choose my current
>occupation out of a hat - this was something that I enjoyed and that I
>was good at.  All of my first hand evidence would lead me to believe that
>doing something full time turns it into a chore.  Those sort of doubts
>have made me reluctant to try it again, but I keep thinking about it, so
>I might make the experiment again.

Another avenue that we have explored in this discussion is to pick
something that you *don't* currently do as a craft, but something that
you might enjoy doing. Learn to do it as a *job* exclusively, saving
your "real" hobbies for enjoyment and doing your new one as a job.
That way, if you find that you do ruin the fun of it, you haven't
killed a craft that you love.

Quote:
> I'm not ready to give up on writing
>yet, and I'm not good enough to take a stab at turning pro at jewelry or
>dollmaking yet (I still have a lot to learn) so I'll keep mulling over
>this for a while.

Well, it'll definitely give you something to work toward. You could
write about the process of becoming a professional crafter!

Quote:
>Thank you for bringing the subject up.  It's done my heart good to hear
>from people who are doing it.  And in the meantime I am enjoying having a
>hobby that doesn't bring any external pressure with it.

Well, that's what hobbies are all about, presumably. :)

Nice to hear your POV.

Chuck
-
Chuck Holcomb

+
Ted Kennedy's bumper sticker: "My other car is under water"

+

 
 
 

Discussion: Work or Fun? Are you a "Pro" or a "Hobbiest"?

Post by Chuck Holco » Wed, 14 Aug 1996 04:00:00


Rand,

Quote:
>Perhaps a good thing to remember is that the selling  of anything
>does not really mean anything.  Sales, or the lack thereof, does
>not place an intrinsic value on the quality or artistry of what we do -- only
>time and the heart can do that.  
>We seem to feel it necessary to pigeon-hole each other with the label "Pro",
>"amateur", "artist", "hobbyist", etc.  I feel we should merely do what we do,
>share what we can, sell or not as we choose or are able, and leave the labels
>for others to play with.  The quality and artistry of the work is what counts.

I think you're missing my point here. What I'm asking is not the
*value* or lack thereof that is assigned to "sold" versus "given"
things...but the relative pleasure one derives from their craft when
they choose to make it their CAREER, rather than their hobby.

I mean, it doesn't matter if you're making paper clip sculptures for
fun. If you decide you want to sell them, and then spend 8 hours a
day, 5 or 6 days a week making them, is it *still* fun, relaxing and
so on?

*That's* my question...
-
Chuck Holcomb

+
Ted Kennedy's bumper sticker: "My other car is under water"

+