Recipe for Faux Ivory?

Recipe for Faux Ivory?

Post by WHO3 » Sun, 22 Mar 1998 04:00:00



Hi All,

Does anyone have or know where I can find a recipe for faux ivory?

Thanks much, Laura

 
 
 

Recipe for Faux Ivory?

Post by Peggy & Bo » Sun, 22 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hi All,

> Does anyone have or know where I can find a recipe for faux
> ivory?

> Thanks much, Laura

From a faux elephant?

(oy, sorry).

peg polymer


 
 
 

Recipe for Faux Ivory?

Post by Echo » Sun, 22 Mar 1998 04:00:00


The ivory that I make is done by the trial and error method. I use about 10%
tranucent and mostly white. I start by mixing in a little yellow and even less
brown (total less than 1%

Ivory will run a whole range of colors from a near pure translucent white to a
yellow nearly the collor of a post-it.  The shading normlly is in the yellow
tan but could be slightly pinkish or blueish. Some even has a slight gray color
(vary rare).

The best thing to do is get a ivory color chat from your friendly dentest. and
start mixing to match.



 
 
 

Recipe for Faux Ivory?

Post by Jeanne A. E. DeVo » Sun, 22 Mar 1998 04:00:00



Quote:

>Does anyone have or know where I can find a recipe for faux ivory?

Here's a simple recipe:

Take a quantity of translucent clay, condition it, and press it into a flat
sheet.

Take the same amount of ivory-colored clay, condition it, and press it into
a sheet the same size. (Sculpey makes an ivory, or you can use a mix of
half white and half champagne Fimo, or whatever mix you like for an ivory
color.)

Lay one sheet on top of the other and cut in fourths. Stack the
fourth-sheets. You now have a block with alternating layers of ivory and
translucent, a total of eight layers. Press and flatten the block with your
hands, then cut it in fourths again and stack again; you now have 32
layers. Repeat this twice more.

You end up with a block of finely layered clay. You probably won't be able
to see the layers very well - the translucent will change color during
firing and they'll become more obvious. These layers form the grain of the
ivory. Slice pieces off each of the four sides (not the top and bottom) and
use them to wrap beads, veneer objects, or whatever. You can draw designs
in the ivory with a needle, make light scratches for an antique "damaged"
look, etc.

Fire the pieces as usual. If you want, after firing, rub a patina of dark
brown paint into the crevices, then wipe most of it off with a paper towel.
After the paint dries, rub with fine steel wool (#000) and buff slightly
for a light sheen.
--
Morning people may be respected, but night people are feared.

The Polymer Clayspot <http://www.best.com/~jaed/clayspot/>

 
 
 

Recipe for Faux Ivory?

Post by Kathy & Wi » Mon, 23 Mar 1998 04:00:00



Quote:



> >Does anyone have or know where I can find a recipe for faux ivory?

> Here's a simple recipe:

> Take a quantity of translucent clay, condition it, and press it into a flat
> sheet.

> Take the same amount of ivory-colored clay, condition it, and press it into
> a sheet the same size. (Sculpey makes an ivory, or you can use a mix of
> half white and half champagne Fimo, or whatever mix you like for an ivory
> color.)

> Lay one sheet on top of the other and cut in fourths. Stack the
> fourth-sheets. You now have a block with alternating layers of ivory and
> translucent, a total of eight layers. Press and flatten the block with your
> hands, then cut it in fourths again and stack again; you now have 32
> layers. Repeat this twice more.

> You end up with a block of finely layered clay. You probably won't be able
> to see the layers very well - the translucent will change color during
> firing and they'll become more obvious. These layers form the grain of the
> ivory. Slice pieces off each of the four sides (not the top and bottom) and
> use them to wrap beads, veneer objects, or whatever. You can draw designs
> in the ivory with a needle, make light scratches for an antique "damaged"
> look, etc.

> Fire the pieces as usual. If you want, after firing, rub a patina of dark
> brown paint into the crevices, then wipe most of it off with a paper towel.
> After the paint dries, rub with fine steel wool (#000) and buff slightly
> for a light sheen.
> --
> Morning people may be respected, but night people are feared.

> The Polymer Clayspot <http://www.best.com/~jaed/clayspot/>

You can also use the Opaque Translucent Fimo for a slightly different
look(between layers of white and champagne mixed 1:1).

Another idea is to use Cernit(the ivory is more translucent overall).

Jean Comport gave me these ideas years ago.

Kathy

 
 
 

Recipe for Faux Ivory?

Post by Echo » Mon, 23 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>You can also usethe Opaque Translucent Fimo for a slightly different look

(between the layers of white and Champagne mixed 1:1)<

Isin't 'Opaque Translucent' a countradition of terms? How can something be
Opaque and translucent at the same time.?



 
 
 

Recipe for Faux Ivory?

Post by Sherry Bail » Wed, 25 Mar 1998 04:00:00


: >You can also usethe Opaque Translucent Fimo for a slightly different look
: (between the layers of white and Champagne mixed 1:1)<

: Isin't 'Opaque Translucent' a countradition of terms? How can something be
: Opaque and translucent at the same time.?

Yes, of course -- Eberhard-Faber named it that, not us! (Maybe a bad
translation from the German??)

This is clay number 01, I think. Art Translucent is less opaque (but not
transparent) and is number 00 and is the generally more preferred translucent
clay for making faux gemstones.

Sherry