Baking Question. Please Help!!

Baking Question. Please Help!!

Post by Sherry Bail » Wed, 06 Dec 1995 04:00:00



Properly cured polymer clay DOES bend. In fact, some things can bend almost in
HALF without damage!

If you want non-flexing clay, think of the ways engineers reinforce thinnish
metal items, like sheet metal. They do stuff like adding thicker ribs,
perpendicular structural pieces, etc. You may need to do the same. (I made a
faux jade bowl, about 1/8 inch thick or so. It flexed too much. I added a rim
at the top which is the same thickness but essentially perpendicular to the
bowl sides and about an inch wide (with a hole in the center to access the
bowl. The top sits on this rim.) Now it doesn't flex at all, which is nice if
you pick the thing up!)

Sherry

 
 
 

Baking Question. Please Help!!

Post by Dream ar » Wed, 06 Dec 1995 04:00:00


The test for a "done" polymer piece is if it gives a hard clink if you hit
it against a hard surface. If it goes thud, it's not done. If you're
making things a quarter of an inch thick you might want to bake it longer.

 
 
 

Baking Question. Please Help!!

Post by Koolz » Wed, 06 Dec 1995 04:00:00


How can I tell if I have baked my pieces long enough??

I'm using Fimo clay a variety of colors.  I made Christmas ornaments using
cookie cutters.  They are about 1/4" in thick and approx 1.5" long 1"
wide.  I baked them at 270 degrees for 30 minutes.  They appear to be
hard.  They do not give to pressure when I press them between my fingers.
They are not burnt.  But ... they do bend a little.  Do they sound like
they are done??  How do you tell if the clay is really done??

Let me know what you think.

Susan.

 
 
 

Baking Question. Please Help!!

Post by Dorothy Mcmill » Thu, 07 Dec 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

>How can I tell if I have baked my pieces long enough??

     When in doubt, give them a second baking.  This will assure that
they are done and stable.  Don't raise the temperature.  Just rebake at
the right temp for the same length of time.  

Dotty in CA

 
 
 

Baking Question. Please Help!!

Post by Susan K. Donle » Mon, 11 Dec 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

> How can I tell if I have baked my pieces long enough??

Tory Hughes told us in a workshop that under-baked FIMO is crumbly and not
flexible. Properly baked FIMO is flexible and cuts cleanly with an Exacto
knife or linoleumn cutter. Over-baked FIMO burns--the colors change and it
becomes brittle (and emits toxic fumes, so be careful!)

If you are not sure, rebake your piece at 265 degrees for 20-30 minutes.
Only too high a temperature can burn polymer clay, not too long a time as
in cooking.

Good luck!

Sue

 
 
 

Baking Question. Please Help!!

Post by Helen Fleisch » Tue, 12 Dec 1995 04:00:00


Sk> Tory Hughes told us in a workshop that under-baked FIMO is crumbly
Sk> and not flexible. Properly baked FIMO is flexible and cuts cleanly
Sk> with an Exacto knife or linoleumn cutter. Over-baked FIMO burns--the
Sk> colors change and it becomes brittle (and emits toxic fumes, so be
Sk> careful!)

Is the ability to mar it with a fingernail, when cooled, a reliable sign
of under baking?  I have always considered that to be the case.  So when
I found I could do that with some faux ivory I baked today, I put it
back for another 20 minutes.  It's cooling in the oven now.  

This is an experiment in making faux scrimshaw using the Tory Hughes
faux ivory recipe, shaping it into simple brooches and decorating those
with impressions from small, fine-line, *** stamps.  Running a lucite
brayer over the impression(lightly) seems to make it look less molded
and a touch more like scrimshaw.  A stamped impression can never look
quite like carving but some of these do come close.

Contemplating the texture of what I presume is underbaked product, I
want to do that again on purpose, carve my own designs in the stuff,
then rebake to finished hardness.

... "I used to be Snow White, but, I drifted." --Mae West