I'm mad (eye shadow)

I'm mad (eye shadow)

Post by Rose Howar » Mon, 19 Jan 1998 04:00:00



I've only been playing with PC for a couple of months, but I used eye
shadows from the beginning.  Anyway one thing I found out was that after
you put on the eye shadow and you decide the color isn't as dark as you
would like for it to be, wait a few minutes until the surface of the clay
has cooled some and apply another coat.  The little spongy eye shadow
applicators also will smooth out some imperfections as you go.  I recently
did a Palomino horse using eye shadow and put several coats on it by
letting it cool between each layer.  Also put a German Shepherd (black and
tan) in the scene and used the same method on him.  
I perfer the colors and texture of eye shadows to acrylics.  Acrylic paint
shines to much for me.  But that's just me.  
I recently got a box of artist pastels and am looking forwards to using
them, but I mainly do nature scenes and the eye shadows give me the nice
muted colors I like.

 
 
 

I'm mad (eye shadow)

Post by Sue Hease » Mon, 19 Jan 1998 04:00:00




Quote:
>I recently got a box of artist pastels and am looking forwards to using
>them, but I mainly do nature scenes and the eye shadows give me the nice
>muted colors I like.

<Grin> Why do you think that artist's pastels do not? They come in an
enormous range of colours - 336 in the Grumbacher range alone - about 50
different blues and greys for example in every shade, tint or tone you
can imagine. Pastel colours are considered some of the most permanent
colours available to artists.

One point that should be raised: Eye shadows are not necessarily created
from permanent pigments. They are designed to be washed off after a day,
after all. Some can discolour badly in light after a year or two. As I
said before, they may contain perfumes and moisturisers that can react
with polyclay.

There are pastel paintings in art museums that are still brilliant after
400 years. It depends how much you want your work to last.

Sue
--
Sue Heaser

 
 
 

I'm mad (eye shadow)

Post by Judi Maddiga » Mon, 19 Jan 1998 04:00:00


I, too, have had better luck with artist's pastels rather than make-up.
One of the blushes I once tried on an angel's cheeks turned brown in the
oven.

With a good, basic set of artist's pastels, you can blend just about any
color you need. I rub the pastels on heavy paper to mix the exact shade,
then apply the powder to the clay using a soft brush. Adding white
pastel to raised areas of colored clay gives nice highlights, too.

Judi Maddigan
http://members.aol.com/pushmolds/index.html

Quote:

> <Grin> Why do you think that artist's pastels do not? They come in an
> enormous range of colours - 336 in the Grumbacher range alone - about 50
> different blues and greys for example in every shade, tint or tone you
> can imagine.

 
 
 

I'm mad (eye shadow)

Post by MJBU » Mon, 19 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>One point that should be raised: Eye shadows are not necessarily created from

permanent pigments. They are designed to be washed off after a day, after all.
Some can discolour badly in light after a year or two. As I
said before, they may contain perfumes and moisturisers that can react with
polyclay.
There are pastel paintings in art museums that are still brilliant after 400
years. It depends how much you want your work to last.
Sue <<<<

Thats worth thinking about.  I know I'm upset at the fact that x-mas orniments
I made are now yellowing.  
ERRRRR     Makes me fell stupid,  cause I have given them to co-workers every
year for the past 3 years.
So I will no longer be using polyuerothene(? spelling)
Too much time and work to have them get ruined by using materials that conflict
with the clay.
Mj   aka;  Nuts4clay
Billings Montana
 ~~Don't worry
         be Happy~~

 
 
 

I'm mad (eye shadow)

Post by violette laport » Mon, 19 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Hi,

Pastels can also be used to color clay. With transparent/translucent
clay, I get interesting results. A little amount of powder goes a long
way.

Violette

 
 
 

I'm mad (eye shadow)

Post by T.J. Howe » Tue, 20 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>I, too, have had better luck with artist's pastels rather than make-up.
>One of the blushes I once tried on an angel's cheeks turned brown in the
>oven.

I never bake the make up I have used. And I do seal it in with Future.
As I have said, I only use it because some friends give it to me and I
don't use much. For my more important pieces I DO use the pastels. And
even there, I don't use many. When I do use it, it's because I want a
really subtle shading that I can't get with acrylic paints.

But I will take this make up issue under advi***t. I may give up
using it all together now that I am feeling like my pieces are getting
better.

Thanks...
Tommie
Everyone runs for hokey pokey
It's the natural thing to do! --Richard Thompson
http://www.FoundCollection.com/~tjturner

 
 
 

I'm mad (eye shadow)

Post by Creage » Tue, 20 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Could not agree more with you Judi...Soft Artist's pastel are the best for
shading polymer clay.  The color seems truer, longer lasting...and is finer so
it seems to adhere to the clay better.  I have always used pastel for coloring
my Dolls heads...but truthfully I started because I was originally a Pastel
Portrait artist...and I had a ton of them laying around...so I gave it a
shot...and loved it...I actually started first with using them on my Early
Early Soft Sculptures...then into the polymer.

Whether you apply with brushes or your finger...Pastels seem to blend so well
(chalk Pastels...not the Oil Pastels)  ...then I lightly spray with several
light misty coats of Krylon Matte Spray #1311 at a distance of about
16"-20"...because I have found that if I spray to close the so called Matte
Spray dries shiny and to thick...

Jodi

 
 
 

I'm mad (eye shadow)

Post by iren » Tue, 20 Jan 1998 04:00:00


If the pastels are applied before baking, will they rub off after baking if
you don't use a glaze?  And do any glazes adversly affect pastels?  Do
brush-on glazes smear the colors?

Another new thing for me to try.....

Irene

 
 
 

I'm mad (eye shadow)

Post by Sue Hease » Tue, 20 Jan 1998 04:00:00




Quote:
>If the pastels are applied before baking, will they rub off after baking if
>you don't use a glaze?

In my experience, only on heavily used jewellery - they don't rub off
things that are not handled much like miniatures. But if you want them
to be really permanent, I think it wise to glaze for protection - using
a matte glaze if you don't want a shine.

Quote:
>  And do any glazes adversly affect pastels?  

I have never found any that do - if the glaze is okay for polyclay, it
is fine for pastels too which are extremely inert substances - far more
tolerant than polyclay!

Quote:
>Do
>brush-on glazes smear the colors?

Baking seems to set them into the surface, so I have not found that they
smear when glazed after baking. I use pastels for jewellery, dolls,
miniatures, ornaments etc etc etc. Wonderful effects -  Enjoy them!

Sue
--
Sue Heaser

 
 
 

I'm mad (eye shadow)

Post by MJBU » Wed, 21 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>Early
>Early Soft Sculptures...then into the polymer.

Jodi....   what kind of medium did you use for your soft scult.  ?     Are you
referring to... like sculpting a bust ? (now no wise cracks ;-) from any of you
in the background) if thats whatyou mean,  what kind of clay did you use.
A long time ago on 'Days of Our Live's' I believe that was the name of the
soap.   Racheal Cory scultped and I always wanted to try that.   But around
here I can't find that kind of clay.   Just kids type modeling clay, or air dry
or of coarse polymer.    Maybe it isn't what I thought.  I always thought you
could leave it out and it wouldn't get hard or dry out,  yet it was soft enough
to move around with fingers.  

Mj  
Billings Montana
 ~~Don't worry
         be Happy~~

 
 
 

I'm mad (eye shadow)

Post by Mayor's Offic » Wed, 21 Jan 1998 04:00:00


I know that all the books recommend adding "blush" to cheeks before baking.
I use Fimo and Sculpy III and I blush the cheeks AFTER baking, using real
blush and an eye shadow brush.  I have never had any problem.  In fact, you
can't get the blush off.  It's there to stay.  When applied to a smooth,
baked surface, the results is much more subtle and realistic looking.  Try
it once and be your own judge.

Marilyn

 
 
 

I'm mad (eye shadow)

Post by Creage » Wed, 21 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>>Early
>>Early Soft Sculptures...then into the polymer.

>Jodi....   what kind of medium did you use for your soft scult.  ?     Are
>you
>referring to... like sculpting a bust ? (now no wise cracks ;-) from any of
>you
>in the background) if thats whatyou mean,  what kind of clay did you use.
>A long time ago on 'Days of Our Live's' I believe that was the name of the
>soap.   Racheal Cory scultped and I always wanted to try that.   But around
>here I can't find that kind of clay.   Just kids type modeling clay, or air
>dry
>or of coarse polymer.    Maybe it isn't what I thought.  I always thought you
>could leave it out and it wouldn't get hard or dry out,  yet it was soft
>enough
>to move around with fingers.  

HI MJ...

We started our Doll Making Career by doing Soft Sculptures which were made from
Nylon stockings (needle sculpted), canvas duck cloth bodies, wool clothing, and
of course..Richard's accessories!  We had a blast and learned so much that we
in time put to use in our Polymer Sculpted Dolls that we do now.  They stood
approx. 27" high.  Any Dolls that you either needle sculpt (needle and thread)
, or manipulate fabric in some way are usually called 'Soft Sculpture'.  It can
be Nylon Stockings, tricot, polyester of some sort...just something that you
can stretch and gather up face shapes in the fabric.  

As far as leaving out...polymer can be left for months (even years in some
cases...if covered) and working later.  Not air dry clay..although a wonderful
medium...it dries to darn fast for me!!  I do like to use the air dry to press
into my sculpted molds that I make from sculpey...to make my lapel pins as it
dries nice and light!

Hope I answered this right...brain is not working yet this am....

Jodi

 
 
 

I'm mad (eye shadow)

Post by MJBU » Wed, 21 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>As far as leaving out...polymer can be left for months (even years in some
>cases...if covered) and working later.

I know that about polymer :-)   I thought because you said soft scultp.   you
meant the kind of sculpting on the soap opera.    I was hoping you could tell
me what kind of clay that is you need.  Maybe it IS the kind that dries out and
they just didn't put that across in the soap.
Please excuse any speeling,  I'm sitting here trying to get my mind off my hip,
 it's out of place and I darn neer cant take it.  I've gone back and redone
other words but dont feel like continuing.
Does anyone else know what type of clay is used for scultping a bust of full
body.    Maybe there isnt such a thing.   It eas all show just for soap.
Mj  
Billings Montana
 ~~Don't worry
         be Happy~~