Cool Tools

Cool Tools

Post by Sherry Bail » Sun, 21 Sep 1997 04:00:00



I was noticing that at Arrowmont I kept seeing new tools I "must have" at some
point, seems like several things in each workshop!

It occurs to me that other people may have spotted things I missed or that
showed up in workshops I didn't take, or even folks who weren't AT Arrowmont
might have found cool tools from another medium that they find useful or maybe
don't have but lust after! So I'm calling for people to post ideas -- maybe a
kind of "Dream Studio" approach!

I'll post a few things I heard about, but I don't want to be the only voice
heard, so I will only mention a few!

Judith Skinner's new JASI cane slicer (in two sizes) is really nice. Sturdily
built, does a GREAT job, gotta have one (especially since my crooked cane
slices are legendary! ;^) )

Dori Grandstrand's Genesis clay conditioner/extruder is on my list for later
-- but anybody who has arthritis or other problems conditioning (Fimo
especially) might want to bump it to high priority! (I currently don't have
too much trouble conditioning the CFC I use, so it's more of a luxury for me
at the moment -- however, I have ideas that will use more clay faster soon, so
it may change!)

Suzanne Stern had a neat jeweler's tool, "parallel pliers". The jaws of the
pliers are hinged in such a way that they remain parallel to each other no
matter how far apart they are opened, instead of opening at a broader triangle
like normal pliers. These are handy little dudes, and can hold flat materials
(metal or baked clay slabs) without nicking them.

Kathi Dustin had info on a potter's slab roller that rolls clay 18 inches
wide! (Kind of taking the pasta machine to new heights of size and
sturdiness!) (And cost, of course! ;^) )

So what else is out there for my shopping list (or Santa's, considering the
appraoching season!)

Sherry

 
 
 

Cool Tools

Post by Lindly » Sun, 21 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
>I was noticing that at Arrowmont I kept seeing new tools I "must have" at>some
>point, seems like several things in each workshop!
>So what else is out there for my shopping list (or Santa's, considering the
>appraoching season!)

Margaret Regan showed  me this one. Scratcher "This durable steel alloy
hand tool is great for scraffitto work. Contains seven different scratching
design options in one tool. Produces a variety of single or multigrooved
parallel scratched lines" works wonderfully to add texture to baked or
unbaked clay  $7.35  pg. 162 Nasco Catalog 1 800 558-9595 (Elise Winters
told me about this GREAT art teachers mail order catalogue)

Same page, same catalogue (courtesy of Elise Winters) Shade tex Texture
plates. six different textures $5.85

Paper crimper, use with tracing paper or deli wrap as demonstrated in Nan
Roche's textile inspirations presentation at Arrowmont Think Ink 800
778-1935 $10.50

 
 
 

Cool Tools

Post by Jeannine » Mon, 22 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>So what else is out there for my shopping list (or Santa's, considering the
>appraoching season!)

>Sherry

I guess this could come under the heading of 'cool tools'.  After using
Kathy Gregson's Foredom buffer at Arrowmont, I became a convert.  However,
I really didn't want to spring for the Foredom, so I went to Sears and
bought a Craftsman bench grinder for $50.  I figured I could work around
the fact that it's not a variable speed machine.  That turns out to be
true, but not for the reason I thought.  They didn't have a large (6" or
so) muslin buffing wheel, so I bought a small one (3") with a shaft.  The
next day I noticed that the package said "for use in all drill chucks,
etc." and the light went on!  I inserted the shaft of the wheel (like a
drill bit) into the drill and now I have three speeds to work with, two on
the drill and a high speed on the grinder!!!  So if any of you have
budgetary limitations but have a drill (it doesn't have to be cordless),
you can have a buffer for about $5.00.  Just make sure it has a shaft with
it--some of the wheels just have a hole for inserting onto the shaft of the
grinder.  If your drill isn't cordless and is heavy, or if you need
hands-free buffing, they make stands for drills that clamp to a workbench.
I don't know how much they cost, but it's basically just a metal frame, so
it can't be too much.

If anyone is interested it is a:

Sears Craftsman '40-ply muslin Buffing Wheel Compound Set'.  The product #
is a small "9" with a line under it, then "64943".  I paid $4.99 for it.

Jeannine

 
 
 

Cool Tools

Post by Krafti » Tue, 23 Sep 1997 04:00:00


<<I really didn't want to spring for the Foredom, so I went to Sears and
bought a Craftsman bench grinder for $50.  I figured I could work around
the fact that it's not a variable speed machine. >>

You can make any machine variable speed with the simple addition of a foot
pedal! ~~~~Joanie :o}

 
 
 

Cool Tools

Post by Wheat Car » Tue, 23 Sep 1997 04:00:00


And dont forget to keep watching home depot for the new
WIZARD Rotary Tool from Black & Decker.

--

Savage Mill Box 2088 - Foundry St - Savage MD 20763-2088

 
 
 

Cool Tools

Post by Helen Fleisch » Tue, 23 Sep 1997 04:00:00




Quote:
>And dont forget to keep watching home depot for the new
>WIZARD Rotary Tool from Black & Decker.

Just saw it on Sunday at Wye River Hardware in Wheaton, but I haven't
seen it at Home Depot yet. Definitely looks like a winner and I'll
probably get one soon. My cordless dremel is a bit wimpy and chunky in
the body compared to this toy.


 Helen "Halla" Fleischer
 Fantasy and Fiber Artist

 
 
 

Cool Tools

Post by Jodie Tic » Tue, 23 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Hi Wheat!

OK...I'll bite...what's a rotary tool?  a drill?  I just searched the
Black & Decker home site...to no avail!  What does it do???

Power tools are good things ....  :+>
--
Enjoy! :+>
Jodie

To send e-mail, remove X's from address!  SPAM stinks!

Quote:

> And dont forget to keep watching home depot for the new
> WIZARD Rotary Tool from Black & Decker.

> --

> Savage Mill Box 2088 - Foundry St - Savage MD 20763-2088

 
 
 

Cool Tools

Post by Need2Be » Wed, 24 Sep 1997 04:00:00


What, Sherry, you forgot the Drill Press and the Jig Saw in Dan Peters'
class???  I'm feeling very much like the Mad Scientist these days, as I
bought both a large drill press and a jig saw.  I can now be seen with
strange masks and glasses on, sawing and drilling away ... but, as Dan
Peters said, "THINK BIG ... THINK REALLY BIG!!!"  ---Dori

 
 
 

Cool Tools

Post by Patti Kiml » Wed, 24 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Sherry,
    We were joking about our tool passions at Arrowmont with Dan Adams
(Cynthia Toops' dh) after she showed us her tools:  a piece of graph
paper, a tissue blade (which is years old), a pin, and her pasta maker.
We asked Dan if he realized what a treasure he had in his wife:  while
the rest of us are out shopping for tools (in many out-of-the way
places, leading to store after store) and spending all our earnings(if
we are selling) so that our clay barely breaks even or pays for itself,
Cynthia is just busy working and creating and DOING.  He agreed and told
us that their accountant is always asking if they don't have any capital
equipment they can deduct from her earnings!  Ha! just turning clay into
gold!
    But my tool passion burns on.  If only I could make that dream
studio happen so I would never have to leave to get another little gizmo
or supply, then maybe I could get down to work!!! ;^)

Patti in Iowa

Quote:

> I was noticing that at Arrowmont I kept seeing new tools I "must have"
> at some
> point, seems like several things in each workshop!

> It occurs to me that other people may have spotted things I missed or
> that
> showed up in workshops I didn't take, or even folks who weren't AT
> Arrowmont
> might have found cool tools from another medium that they find useful
> or maybe
> don't have but lust after! So I'm calling for people to post ideas --
> maybe a
> kind of "Dream Studio" approach!

> I'll post a few things I heard about, but I don't want to be the only
> voice
> heard, so I will only mention a few!

> Judith Skinner's new JASI cane slicer (in two sizes) is really nice.
> Sturdily
> built, does a GREAT job, gotta have one (especially since my crooked
> cane
> slices are legendary! ;^) )

> Dori Grandstrand's Genesis clay conditioner/extruder is on my list for
> later
> -- but anybody who has arthritis or other problems conditioning (Fimo
> especially) might want to bump it to high priority! (I currently don't
> have
> too much trouble conditioning the CFC I use, so it's more of a luxury
> for me
> at the moment -- however, I have ideas that will use more clay faster
> soon, so
> it may change!)

> Suzanne Stern had a neat jeweler's tool, "parallel pliers". The jaws
> of the
> pliers are hinged in such a way that they remain parallel to each
> other no
> matter how far apart they are opened, instead of opening at a broader
> triangle
> like normal pliers. These are handy little dudes, and can hold flat
> materials
> (metal or baked clay slabs) without nicking them.

> Kathi Dustin had info on a potter's slab roller that rolls clay 18
> inches
> wide! (Kind of taking the pasta machine to new heights of size and
> sturdiness!) (And cost, of course! ;^) )

> So what else is out there for my shopping list (or Santa's,
> considering the
> appraoching season!)

> Sherry

 
 
 

Cool Tools

Post by Wheat Car » Wed, 24 Sep 1997 04:00:00


My dream is a studio that was large enough to accommodate small
groups of visiting artists.

--

Savage Mill Box 2088 - Foundry St - Savage MD 20763-2088

 
 
 

Cool Tools

Post by violette laport » Thu, 25 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Well, the tools I really like are those that can be custom-made. Those
tiny embossing stamps made out of turkey-pan aluminium in the Margaret
Maggio class are brilliant. "Small is super."

Violette

Quote:

> What, Sherry, you forgot the Drill Press and the Jig Saw in Dan Peters'
> class???  I'm feeling very much like the Mad Scientist these days, as I
> bought both a large drill press and a jig saw.  I can now be seen with
> strange masks and glasses on, sawing and drilling away ... but, as Dan
> Peters said, "THINK BIG ... THINK REALLY BIG!!!"  ---Dori

 
 
 

Cool Tools

Post by Dorothy Mcmill » Thu, 25 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>Well, the tools I really like are those that can be custom-made. Those
>tiny embossing stamps made out of turkey-pan aluminium in the Margaret
>Maggio class are brilliant. "Small is super."

>Violette

Hi Violette;   I had Margaret's class at arrowmont, but she didn't show
us how to make the embossing stamps out of turkey-pan aluminium.  Can you
give me a rundown on how she did them?
-

 
 
 

Cool Tools

Post by Kathy Dud » Fri, 26 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Probably the most cool tool ever made would be a pasta machine with lexan
rollers that would not react with the clay and, thus, eliminate those
ugly old gray streaks.  Someone out there ??? are you listening?????

 
 
 

Cool Tools

Post by Jva » Tue, 30 Sep 1997 04:00:00


On Mon, 22 Sep 1997 10:48:06 -0700, Jodie Tice

Quote:

>Hi Wheat!

>OK...I'll bite...what's a rotary tool?  a drill?  I just searched the
>Black & Decker home site...to no avail!  What does it do???

Checking the Black and Decker site under new products, I came up with
the following URL for the Wizard Variable Speed Rotary Tool:, model
RT550:
http://www.blackanddecker.com/cgi-unprot/bdPage?catalogId=3&act=quick...

Specifications say that it draws .72 amps and the speed varies from
8,000 to 24,000 RPM.  Sounds like a competitor to the Dremel.

Jvan

 
 
 

Cool Tools

Post by LTC4 » Wed, 01 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
>My dream is a studio that was large enough to accommodate small
>groups of visiting artists.

Oh yes Wheat, mine too!  (Or a few students!)  The 7' drafting table
covered with formica for clay work and the small desk for assembly/bead
work takes up my entire studio!  I have to suck in my gut to squeeze
between the two to reach the filing cabinet and then kind of crouch under
the drafting table to dig through it!

Linda in W.TX