TLS & Regular clay

TLS & Regular clay

Post by Elizabet » Tue, 13 Jul 1999 04:00:00



Hi, Dawn!
   I just did the pun swap with TLS over "Scrimo" (S3/Premo/FIMO) The pieces were
baked repeatedly at 300 degrees without even a hint of a fume and no apparent damage.
   I watched it pretty closely, that first time, but, half an hour didn't cause the
slightest problem, and the TLS cleared up really well.
   Have fun!

--
Elizabeth
http://www.homestead.com/ziggybeth/poly.html

 
 
 

TLS & Regular clay

Post by kade.. » Fri, 16 Jul 1999 04:00:00


You know how it is: you get an idea because of something someone posted
(I think it was about fingerprints in the clay) and the wheels start
turning, turning so fast and furious that they squeel and screech and
you've just got to do something.  Well, it's after three in the morning
and I just pulled angel out of the oven and she has the most beautiful
skin because of TLS.  Not only did the TLS produce a smooth and matte
and almost a flat finish, it was applied over a painted sculpture
(eyebrows, thinted skin, etc). I thinned the TLS with Diluent and
cleaned my brush with ***, and painted the thinnest of layers over
the fleshy parts of my sculpture. I baked it at 275 degrees for twenty
minutes and she did just fine.  The layer was so thin that higher,
recommended temps weren't necessary.

Katherine Dewey
Saying thanks to whomever posted the note about TLS for a smooth finish.

--
http://www.FoundCollection.com/~lgdewey
Elvenwork

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TLS & Regular clay

Post by kade.. » Sun, 18 Jul 1999 04:00:00


This is an addendum to the previous message I posted (see below):
Although the finish was matte, there were some rough spots where the TLS
had flowed due to heat and gravity.  These imperfections, visible only
under magnificaton, proved difficult to deal with.  TLS is very hard,
difficult to sand.  Infact, I actually did some damage to my sculpture
trying to deal with this. Still, I intend to explore the possibilities
this technique presents more fully.

Katherine Dewey
--
http://www.FoundCollection.com/~lgdewey
Elvenwork


Quote:

> You know how it is: you get an idea because of something someone
posted
> (I think it was about fingerprints in the clay) and the wheels start
> turning, turning so fast and furious that they squeel and screech and
> you've just got to do something.  Well, it's after three in the
morning
> and I just pulled angel out of the oven and she has the most beautiful
> skin because of TLS.  Not only did the TLS produce a smooth and matte
> and almost a flat finish, it was applied over a painted sculpture
> (eyebrows, thinted skin, etc). I thinned the TLS with Diluent and
> cleaned my brush with ***, and painted the thinnest of layers over
> the fleshy parts of my sculpture. I baked it at 275 degrees for twenty
> minutes and she did just fine.  The layer was so thin that higher,
> recommended temps weren't necessary.

> Katherine Dewey
> Saying thanks to whomever posted the note about TLS for a smooth
finish.

Sent via Deja.com http://www.FoundCollection.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.
 
 
 

TLS & Regular clay

Post by LynnD » Mon, 19 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Do you think the problem would have been solved if you had baked her
face down, so that TLS wouldn't have built up in the hollows?  (Or
would you then get a drip on her nose?)

Just an idea that sprung at me . . .

LynnDel

Quote:

>This is an addendum to the previous message I posted (see below):
>Although the finish was matte, there were some rough spots where the TLS
>had flowed due to heat and gravity.  These imperfections, visible only
>under magnificaton, proved difficult to deal with.  TLS is very hard,
>difficult to sand.  Infact, I actually did some damage to my sculpture
>trying to deal with this. Still, I intend to explore the possibilities
>this technique presents more fully.

>Katherine Dewey

                              ~*~*~*~*~
                To e-mail me, remove the lie
(beginning with iLove and ending with Housework)
 
 
 

TLS & Regular clay

Post by J Bish » Tue, 20 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Hi,
   I love the finish you can get with TLS too. The first thing I learned about
using it is to keep the coat thin. In the beginning, I was always using more
than I needed and wasting material and spending forever cleaning up the
problems. Here are a couple of things that might help.Try sponging a thin layer
on instead of using a brush. Test it first to see if you like this method,
because it does make the matte texture more pronounced. Let the piece rest for
an hour before you bake. This will let the clay absorb a bit of the plasticiser
as well as evaporate some. If it runs or pools, you can still clean it up. Have
your oven pre heated. I don't think you'd want to let any extra TLS pool in the
features because when it is bake in one thicker layer it is far less
transparent and you'll lose the detail.
Hope this helps,

<<
Do you think the problem would have been solved if you had baked her
face down, so that TLS wouldn't have built up in the hollows?  (Or
would you then get a drip on her nose?)

Just an idea that sprung at me . . .

LynnDel

Quote:

>This is an addendum to the previous message I posted (see below):
>Although the finish was matte, there were some rough spots where the TLS
>had flowed due to heat and gravity.  These imperfections, visible only
>under magnificaton, proved difficult to deal with.  TLS is very hard,
>difficult to sand.  Infact, I actually did some damage to my sculpture
>trying to deal with this. Still, I intend to explore the possibilities
>this technique presents more fully. >>

Jody Bishel
 
 
 

TLS & Regular clay

Post by S.J.Whyt » Wed, 21 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Hi,

        When I have used TLS over sculpted pieces, the trick of
waiting at least an hour to allow drips to happen seems to
really help identify problems (Thanks, Jody!)  Also I have
found the occasional noticeable drip easier to remove with a
small-bladed craft knife than to sand off.
TLS seems to carve pretty easily.

Sara Jane Whyte

Quote:

> Hi,
>    I love the finish you can get with TLS too. The first thing I learned about
> using it is to keep the coat thin. In the beginning, I was always using more
> than I needed and wasting material and spending forever cleaning up the
> problems. Here are a couple of things that might help.Try sponging a thin layer
> on instead of using a brush. Test it first to see if you like this method,
> because it does make the matte texture more pronounced. Let the piece rest for
> an hour before you bake. This will let the clay absorb a bit of the plasticiser
> as well as evaporate some. If it runs or pools, you can still clean it up. Have
> your oven pre heated. I don't think you'd want to let any extra TLS pool in the
> features because when it is bake in one thicker layer it is far less
> transparent and you'll lose the detail.
> Hope this helps,

> <<
> Do you think the problem would have been solved if you had baked her
> face down, so that TLS wouldn't have built up in the hollows?  (Or
> would you then get a drip on her nose?)

> Just an idea that sprung at me . . .

> LynnDel


> >This is an addendum to the previous message I posted (see below):
> >Although the finish was matte, there were some rough spots where the TLS
> >had flowed due to heat and gravity.  These imperfections, visible only
> >under magnificaton, proved difficult to deal with.  TLS is very hard,
> >difficult to sand.  Infact, I actually did some damage to my sculpture
> >trying to deal with this. Still, I intend to explore the possibilities
> >this technique presents more fully. >>

> Jody Bishel

 
 
 

TLS & Regular clay

Post by kade.. » Thu, 22 Jul 1999 04:00:00


I did wait for about 40 minutes before the piece went into the oven. The
problem was that, though the layer I brushed on was thin in itself, the
mixture of TLS was too thick. More diluent would have made a difference.
There were no drips, but a shallow pool in the small of her back and
between her shoulderblades, places that proved impossible to reach
because of the wings.

As I said, I intend to keep exploring this technique.  It was nice to
create a flat finish and protect painted surfaces (the eyebrows could
not be scratched off).

Katherine Dewey
--
http://www.itouch.net/~lgdewey
Elvenwork

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Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

 
 
 

TLS & Regular clay

Post by kell » Thu, 22 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> I did wait for about 40 minutes before the piece went into the oven. The
> problem was that, though the layer I brushed on was thin in itself, the
> mixture of TLS was too thick. More diluent would have made a difference.

I have a pint of TLS that is gradually getting thicker
(although not in any danger of becoming solid) - is diluent
the thinner of choice?
 
 
 

TLS & Regular clay

Post by J Bish » Fri, 23 Jul 1999 04:00:00


<< I have a pint of TLS that is gradually getting thicker
(although not in any danger of becoming solid) - is diluent
the thinner of choice? >>

Yes. I have not tried mineral oil, though. I stick to the diluent because it is
made by the same company and I didn't want to take chances with the mineral
oil.

Jody Bishel