Color Help

Color Help

Post by Sharo » Tue, 21 Mar 2000 04:00:00



Hello All!

Can anyone help me? I am trying to make a
camoflauge green color in preemo or sculpey.

I've tried mixing different greens together,
mixing them with small amounts of brown, and
everything I come up with it too dark or too
pastel or christmas greenish.  

Does anyone have a color combination for this,
like 2 parts green mixed with 2 parts ??? . Or
X parts this color to X parts that color??

I'm also, trying to make a khaki color and runnning
into the same thing.

Any help would be appreciated! Thanks in Advance

Sharon


 
 
 

Color Help

Post by Diane Blac » Tue, 21 Mar 2000 04:00:00


Sharon,

Re the khaki color, try adding a bit of red to your green (it's the
complement of green).  If that's too dark, add some white or add yellow if
you're going for a warmer green.  These kinds of tans are hard to delineate
without knowing exactly what "khaki" or "tan," etc., are.  I tend to think
of khaki as coming in a greenish or yellowish form; some tans tend toward
yellow though . . . does anyone know the whole range?

As for camoflauge colors, I guess I tend to think of them as splotches of
all kinds of greens, browns and yellows . . . which one were you thinking
of?  You could try marbling those colors well and see what you come up
with??

Diane B.


http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumList?u=107545

 
 
 

Color Help

Post by scott & iren » Tue, 21 Mar 2000 04:00:00


Sharon wrote

Quote:
>camoflauge green color in preemo or sculpey.

Try yellow with a smidgen of black or purple (its complement).

I use 7 parts Premo zinc yellow to 1 part Premo black for "olive green."
Adjust up or down as you need to.  I don't know what proportion to use if
you're using cadmium yellow, but I imagine it would be similar.

This is an advantage of doing tedious color studies -- you find out that
yellow and black make olive green.  :)

Irene in western NC
remove first x to email me
        ---
http://www.pobox.com/~good.night.irene
hot-from-the-oven stuff at
http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumList?u=178676

 
 
 

Color Help

Post by Diane Blac » Thu, 23 Mar 2000 04:00:00


Re olive green, rusts, etc. . . . . Here is something I found *very*
helpful that came from "Gene" . . . does anyone know if this was a post, or
something I copied long ago from a web site (before I knew I'd be sharing
it with others)??      
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If you add two complements together -in equal proportion - you will get
some form of brown.
If you add yellow and violet, the result is the ochers. If you add red and
green, you get the umbers. And if it's orange and blue, the product is the
siennas.

If you add them together in "unequal" proportion - 75/25 for instance, the
result will still be close to a brown, but it will be more characteristic
of the larger percentage color - 75 percent yellow to 25 percent violet
will be a more of an old gold color, for instance. Rust, olive green, navy
blue and such other colors as maple, tan, wheat, chocolate, ox***,
auburn, walnut, seal, and many other colors are the result of mixing two
complements together in equal or unequal proportion.

You are able to obtain these results because complement pairs contain all
three primary colors - and the net result of mixing all three primaries in
equal proportion (again theoretically) is black - or something very close
to black.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Diane B.


http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

Color Help

Post by BethCurra » Thu, 23 Mar 2000 04:00:00


I had made my 6 year old a "Pikachu" cane, and the cane ends made a khaki
color.  It was Fimo, about 3 parts white, 2 parts of yellow, 1/8 part black
(estimated, maybe a bit more).  There was no red in it 'cause I forgot the
red cheek dots.  Boy did I catch whoop-jamboreehoo for that.  He sat there
with a red Sharpie painting the cheek spots on to each cane slice. - Beth
Curran, Slightly Relectant Pokemon ***

She was not quite what you would call refined. She was not quite what you
would call unrefined. She was the kind of person that keeps a parrot.
- Following the Equator; Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar


Quote:
> Hello All!

> Can anyone help me? I am trying to make a
> camoflauge green color in preemo or sculpey.

> I've tried mixing different greens together,
> mixing them with small amounts of brown, and
> everything I come up with it too dark or too
> pastel or christmas greenish.

> Does anyone have a color combination for this,
> like 2 parts green mixed with 2 parts ??? . Or
> X parts this color to X parts that color??

> I'm also, trying to make a khaki color and runnning
> into the same thing.

> Any help would be appreciated! Thanks in Advance

> Sharon



 
 
 

Color Help

Post by scott & iren » Thu, 23 Mar 2000 04:00:00


BethCurran wrote

Quote:
>I had made my 6 year old a "Pikachu" cane,

Hey!  Did I get a couple of these beads in a swap that Byrd hosted?  If they
were yours, they were really great!  Very nicely done.  I don't have kids,
so I'm not so intimately familiar with Pokemon to have noticed the missing
cheek dots.

Irene in western NC
remove first x to email me
        ---
http://www.pobox.com/~good.night.irene
hot-from-the-oven stuff at
http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumList?u=178676

 
 
 

Color Help

Post by Sharo » Sat, 25 Mar 2000 04:00:00


Hi All!

A thank you to everyone who responded to my post
for help in making olive greens and khaki colors come
out right in polymer clay!

My neighbor's daughter is a new army recruit, and
she wanted some pieces of jewelry that would go with
her military colors!

Basically, I made small to medium beads that are very
irregular in size and shape, almost look like the small
rocks from my driveway, with I rolled over the beads for
texture. I used 2 lengths of tigertail for each necklace,
(extra durable I hope!!) and strung the bead rocks onto
that with tannish and black colored spacers.  

The end result was very sophisticated yet rugged looking!
I was surprised. I was also disappointed that she had to
leave for training 3 days earlier than planned and I
didn't get to take pictures of the choker/necklace or bracelet.
I just had time to finish them up for her.

I'm anxious now to make another one, or at least experiment
with the rock looking bead technique more, as this was the
first time I've ever tried that.

Once again, thanks for all for your help. I love this group.
Great info - great help and advice!!

 
 
 

Color Help

Post by Diana Cric » Wed, 29 Mar 2000 04:00:00


Sharon,
If you go to
http://www.webhaven.com/crick/TTS2/index.html

you will see a scan of Yellow-Green desaturated scale with Red-Violet as
Diane described so perfectly!!

Diana


Quote:
> Hello All!

> Can anyone help me? I am trying to make a
> camoflauge green color in preemo or sculpey.

> I've tried mixing different greens together,
> mixing them with small amounts of brown, and
> everything I come up with it too dark or too
> pastel or christmas greenish.

> Does anyone have a color combination for this,
> like 2 parts green mixed with 2 parts ??? . Or
> X parts this color to X parts that color??

> I'm also, trying to make a khaki color and runnning
> into the same thing.

> Any help would be appreciated! Thanks in Advance

> Sharon



 
 
 

Color Help

Post by kade.. » Thu, 30 Mar 2000 04:00:00


Try 2 parts Green, 1 part Raw Sienna, 1 part to 2 parts Ecru for a
"fatigue" green.
For a khaki tan, try equal parts Raw Sienna and Cadmium Yellow.

Hope this helps...Katherine Dewey


Quote:

> Hello All!

> Can anyone help me? I am trying to make a
> camoflauge green color in preemo or sculpey.

> I've tried mixing different greens together,
> mixing them with small amounts of brown, and
> everything I come up with it too dark or too
> pastel or christmas greenish.

> Does anyone have a color combination for this,
> like 2 parts green mixed with 2 parts ??? . Or
> X parts this color to X parts that color??

> I'm also, trying to make a khaki color and runnning
> into the same thing.

> Any help would be appreciated! Thanks in Advance

> Sharon



--
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