Kinda Bummed (Long)

Kinda Bummed (Long)

Post by diane.vill.. » Thu, 18 Dec 1997 04:00:00



I work in a large department in a security building with key-coded
doors; only co-workers can come onto my floor.  Three times a year, I
put out a display of PC jewelry in the kitchen area with a note
explaining what polymer clay is and to contact me to place orders.  (I
actually have a dedicated following!)  Never had a problem until last
Monday, when the display cards disappeared between 6:30 and 7:00 a.m.,
along, of course, with all my sample pins.  They were mostly production
pins that I can reproduce ($5.00/each), and also had a couple of unique
pieces like postage stamp pins ($15.00). I'm disappointed about the
financial loss (around $100), but I'm more upset with the idea that a
co-worker, someone whose computer I've fixed or someone I've personally
trained on application packages, would do this.  Obviously, it was my
fault for leaving the display out, but if someone really wanted the
pieces, they could have taken at 12:00 noon, for that matter.  I put up
a sign in the kitchen requesting the person who borrowed my jewelry
display return it - no questions asked.  As it's now been more than two
days, I'm afraid it's no longer a question of "borrowing".

On the bright side, my work must have improved greatly after taking
classes at Arrowmont; never had pieces go missing before.

Looking forward, I'm thinking of taking color copies of my production
pieces and posting the copies in the kitchen area.  At least that way, I
won't be out so much if something happens. I would greatly appreciate
any suggestions on this.  Thank you in advance.

Diane (on the Connecticut coast)

 
 
 

Kinda Bummed (Long)

Post by PolyArti » Thu, 18 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>> Looking forward, I'm thinking of taking color copies of my production

pieces and posting the copies in the kitchen area.  At least that way, I
won't be out so much if something happens. I would greatly appreciate
any suggestions on this. <<

Diane...
   I'm sorry for your loss.  Our car was stolen two years ago on Christmas Eve.
 Since we live near the (Mexico) border, it was gone before it could be
reported.  We still owed $500. on it, our only vehicle.  What upset me the most
was the cruelty I felt delivered by a stranger.  Obviously the theif didn't
know or care about how much he hurt us.  I suppose it is even worse when the
theif knows you personally.
   Anyway, You probably should make a display board with copies or photos.  You
could also glue on some sample canes or other actual parts rather than any
finished pieces.
   Do you have a flatbed scanner or access to one?  I find that scans of
jewelry jet-printed on glossy photo paper look almost as good as regular
photos.  Good luck and have a Merry Christmas in spite of a little bad will.

Susan in AZ

 
 
 

Kinda Bummed (Long)

Post by Dean &/or Lisa Thompso » Thu, 18 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Diane -

What a bummer!  Well, at least you have the comfort of knowing you're
stuff is so good, people are willing to steal it.  (Not that that fact
makes up for being out the $$.)

Hopefully, the holiday spirit will (belatedly) come alive in the
"borrower" and they're return the "borrowed" goods.

I work for a major corporation, and it never amazes me the things people
will steal.  (I had my service anniversary award - still in the box -
stolen off my desk one time.  Now, really, are you that hard up for a
plexiglass and fake brass clock with our corporate logo on it?  Get a
life.)

Hope things turn out well for you.

Lisa

 
 
 

Kinda Bummed (Long)

Post by Aurorads » Fri, 19 Dec 1997 04:00:00


I feel so bad for you! But I know how you feel. A friend of mine brought me
some hand-me-downs for my son. There were an expensive, almost new pair of nike
sneakers in the bag. She brought them to me at work, so I stored them in the
back room of our bakery. I left the shoes in plain sight, thinking nothing of
it. After all, there were only about 8 of us there that day, and I consider
them all my friends. When I took the bag home a couple hours later, the shoes
were gone! I wasn't that upset about the loss (goodness knows my son has more
than enough shoes). It was the fact that one of my friends had stolen from me.
I was very depressed about that.

http://members.aol.com/auroradsgn

 
 
 

Kinda Bummed (Long)

Post by Sherry Bail » Fri, 19 Dec 1997 04:00:00


If everything was gone are you sure it wasn't against some rule (or somebody's
IDEA about the rules) to sell things that way? (New manager, maybe?) Just an
alternative possibility to maybe check into -- maybe they were removed because
someone decided you shouldn't do that??

On theft: I was a founding member of a co-op artist's gallery in Michigan. We
couldn't afford insurance, so any shoplifting was on the head of the artist
involved, so of course, we did all we could to deter it, within
reason. Jewelry (when we had someone making it) was locked up, small pottery
displyed near where the person working could see it, etc. I had a small wall
*** (a little tapestry of a winter scene*** from driftwood) rolled up
and stolen once. We all decided to look at it as a kind of warped compliment:
someone liked our stuff well enough to break the law to get it! (This,
however, does NOT mean that any one of us wouldn't have been happy to see the
culprits caught and jailed -- maybe with broken kneecaps! ;^)  ) (Just kidding
about hte kneecaps -- I think!)

You kind of have to wonder about the morality of some people... I am sure some
shoplift purely for the thrill of getting away with it, maybe because they are
cheap, but somehow they don't choose to see they are harming some other
person. (I have heard shoplifters say "insurance will cover it" in a smug way
like that means it doesn't matter. Even, like at our gallery, when there IS no
insurance, and the person harmed is the artist who labored over it.)

Some creep stole things at the Arrowmont store, and Kathleen Dustin told me
that she had a piece stolen from the end of a display once, not long ago. On
her level, one lost piece can kind of wipe out the profits from a smallish
show. It's a darned shame.

(I think the idea of color photocopies is best, under the circumstances. You
can always keep the actual things under lock and key, but accessible that
way. Maybe have one of those glass topped "butterfly boxes" behind your desk
or something.)

Sherry

 
 
 

Kinda Bummed (Long)

Post by Alida Jati » Fri, 19 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Lisa said,

Quote:
>I work for a major corporation, and it never amazes me the things people
>will steal.  <snip>

I used to do computer consulting, and for a while I worked at a place
that had a communal refrigerator. I kept a jar of "Goober Grape"
(PB&J) in there for lunches. Since I wasn't planning to serve it to
anyone but myself, I ate directly out of the jar and put the leftover
portion back into the refrigerator. I also happened to come down with
the flu around the same time as someone stole the "Goober Grape."
Instant karma, I suppose!

Alida

 
 
 

Kinda Bummed (Long)

Post by iren » Fri, 19 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Ah, Diane, I'm so sorry!  I've had things stolen at shows, but with the
amounts of people that pass through the booth, it's almost to be expected.
But a co-worker!  Jeez, I hate it for you.  How can someone take something
they haven't paid for and then wear it or give it away and not feel totally
awful every time they see it?!

The color copies or scanned images are a good idea, and necessary, it
appears.  Is it possible that on the display you can indicate you'll have
actual samples to show every day at noon, or whatever your lunchtime is?
Then you can keep the samples with you but still have them available for
anyone who needs to see the actual thing.

My sympathies, dear.  If you ever find out who it was, you can really FIX
their computer!

Happy Holidays anyway,
Irene
to reply remove i and i from address

 
 
 

Kinda Bummed (Long)

Post by cyl » Wed, 31 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Have you informed your company's security department about this?
They're going to want to know that they have a dishonest employee on
their hands.  They may never be able to recover your work, but they
may eventually catch the thief stealing something else.  And it's not
as if it were just one piece of your work.  This person obviously
believes in going for wholesale amounts.

Write down details about the pieces of work that you can remember
best.  Anything distinctive that'll help nail the person if you happen
to later catch sight of it on someone.  Don't think the thief would be
too smart to wear it or give it to a fellow employee who might wear
it.  You'd be astounded at how stupid some thieves can be.

Quote:

>I work in a large department in a security building with key-coded
>doors; only co-workers can come onto my floor.  Three times a year, I
>put out a display of PC jewelry in the kitchen area with a note
>explaining what polymer clay is and to contact me to place orders.  (I
>actually have a dedicated following!)  Never had a problem until last
>Monday, when the display cards disappeared between 6:30 and 7:00 a.m.,
>along, of course, with all my sample pins.  They were mostly production
>pins that I can reproduce ($5.00/each), and also had a couple of unique
>pieces like postage stamp pins ($15.00). I'm disappointed about the
>financial loss (around $100), but I'm more upset with the idea that a
>co-worker, someone whose computer I've fixed or someone I've personally
>trained on application packages, would do this.  Obviously, it was my

>Diane (on the Connecticut coast)

-------

"If I die of curiosity, who will entertain you with naive questions?"

 I only answer my mail on an average of once every two months.  Be patient.

 http://www.visi.com/~cyli/