Ravensdale ideas

Ravensdale ideas

Post by Cass » Fri, 27 Sep 1996 04:00:00



  I'm afraid I don't have the time to post any long notes on my Ravensdale
impressions, but I do have one helpful tidbit to offer . Hopefully, I can
post more,  after I make some headway on a new house I just moved to and
the new job I started a week after I made the  house move.
  Karen Lewis, also known as Klew, had a terrific idea for storing  active
tissue blades. You know, those things we cannot do without but which we
occasionally get careless in storing and... well, you've gotten the same
cuts I have, no?
  She sized two sheets of polymer clay about a quarter to a half inch
bigger than all four sides of her tissue blade. She poked stitching holes
along one side of each piece of clay.  Bake.
  The  pieces were then laidout  beside each other. The sides with holes
were facing inward. On top of each piece of polymer, Karen glued little
flat magnets that would attract each other. When the glue dried, she
stitched up the sides of the two polymer pieces, so they formed a little
book  that opened. She dropped in her tissue blade on top of one side of
magnets, closed the "book" and the two magnets held the thin, magnetized
tissue blade inside.
   Klew, of course, had the front of her tissue blade holder magnificently
decorated, and the stitching string had little beads dangling below.
   Cynthia Tinapple spotted Klew's creation and brought it to my
attention. If my description leaves too much to the imagination, Cynthia
plans to do an item on Klew's tissue blade holder in an upcoming
PolyINFOmer, which, hopefully, will include photos I shot of it.
   Cassma

 
 
 

Ravensdale ideas

Post by Ellen Finkels » Fri, 27 Sep 1996 04:00:00


I've seen something similar with just card stock.  Of course it makes
much more sense to decorate with polymer since that is what we are all
about!!! <G>  The trouble I have is keeping the new ones seperate from
the old ones. If I did this book thang, I could have a "new" side and
an "old" side.

Thanks.


slicer.)

Quote:

>  I'm afraid I don't have the time to post any long notes on my Ravensdale
>impressions, but I do have one helpful tidbit to offer . Hopefully, I can
>post more,  after I make some headway on a new house I just moved to and
>the new job I started a week after I made the  house move.
>  Karen Lewis, also known as Klew, had a terrific idea for storing  active
>tissue blades. You know, those things we cannot do without but which we
>occasionally get careless in storing and... well, you've gotten the same
>cuts I have, no?
>  She sized two sheets of polymer clay about a quarter to a half inch
>bigger than all four sides of her tissue blade. She poked stitching holes
>along one side of each piece of clay.  Bake.
>  The  pieces were then laidout  beside each other. The sides with holes
>were facing inward. On top of each piece of polymer, Karen glued little
>flat magnets that would attract each other. When the glue dried, she
>stitched up the sides of the two polymer pieces, so they formed a little
>book  that opened. She dropped in her tissue blade on top of one side of
>magnets, closed the "book" and the two magnets held the thin, magnetized
>tissue blade inside.
>   Klew, of course, had the front of her tissue blade holder magnificently
>decorated, and the stitching string had little beads dangling below.
>   Cynthia Tinapple spotted Klew's creation and brought it to my
>attention. If my description leaves too much to the imagination, Cynthia
>plans to do an item on Klew's tissue blade holder in an upcoming
>PolyINFOmer, which, hopefully, will include photos I shot of it.
>   Cassma



 
 
 

Ravensdale ideas

Post by Uncle Al » Fri, 27 Sep 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>I was told that there is way to take PEG,  dissolve in water...and then add
>some chemical (possibly Bisphenol A) to cause the solution to "gel" or
>"firm" up.  Is this possible and if so, can anyone give me some info on how
>I might go about doing this.

Try adding a percent or so of borax.  Bisphenol-A won't do anything.

Difunctional aromatic acid chlorides, cold and with 2 eq. of base, might
also do it.  Remember that the only OHs for crosslinking are at the
two ends of each molecule.  If you don't grab them both you don't
crosslink the mass.  The statistics are damning.

I would take the PEG, make the bis(allyl ether), Pt-catalyzed
hydrosilylate with (MeO)3SiH or Cl3SiH, and then dissolve that in water.
 The silyl groups will hydrolyze and then condense.  It works for
water-resistant silicone caulking using poly(propylene oxide).

If you end-terminate with bulky hydrophobic aliphatic or aromatic groups
you might get a system with undergoes reversible sol-gel conversion with
temperature ("crystallization" of the end groups analogous to Kraton
thermoplastic elastomers).  

Haven't we been here before?

--
Alan "Uncle Al" Schwartz

http://www.netprophet.co.nz/uncleal/        (best of + new)
http://www.ultra.net.au/~wisby/uncleal.htm  (lots of + new)
 (Toxic URLs! Unsafe for children, Democrats, and most mammals)
"Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?"  The Net!

 
 
 

Ravensdale ideas

Post by SHANEANG » Sat, 28 Sep 1996 04:00:00


I've finally gave in and decided to give a simple beginners*** class.
I figured the very most people I could handle in a class would be 10. So I
designated this Sat. for 2 classes of 10 people and to my suprise one
class is full and the other is almost full! Whoah!

Anyway I plan for each person to make a simple flower cane. Each persons
cane will have a different flower color. I want them to keep 1/2 of the
cane for themselves and then reduce the other half down, cut it in
segments and trade them around with the other people. Then they will each
make a composite cane from all the segments they have collected.

So...... do any of you have any tips for giving classes? What has been
your most sucessfull class and why? What is a good size? Any advice is
appreciated muchly.

Shane

 
 
 

Ravensdale ideas

Post by MHawthor » Sat, 28 Sep 1996 04:00:00


Shane, I did something similar when my family asked me to teach them
something of the*** I do... there were 12 of us, sisters, nieces,
sisters-in-law, mother, pre***s, ***s and even a few pre*** boys!!
They had a GREAT time.  I showed them how to make a very simple flower,
and they all used the same background color and some of the same colors in
their flowers.  Once we had reduced the canes (one of my sentimental
sisters cried when she cut open her cane!!!!), I made beads and each
person had a bead of everyone else, and we made necklaces.  These "family
beads" made wonderful necklaces, and are treasured by each and every one
of us.  (The boys made necklaces for their moms!).  Just take them through
it step-by-step together, and you should do fine.  Actually, the younger
kids often did better than the ***s b/c they were not as afraid to
experiment.  Have fun!   Molly

 
 
 

Ravensdale ideas

Post by Richard Bar » Tue, 01 Oct 1996 04:00:00


Quote:


>>I was told that there is way to take PEG,  dissolve in water...and then add
>>some chemical (possibly Bisphenol A) to cause the solution to "gel" or
>>"firm" up.  Is this possible and if so, can anyone give me some info on how
>>I might go about doing this.
>>Thanks in advance,
>>Jeff

I believe a polyacid (e.g. polymethacrylic acid) will do this.
 
 
 

Ravensdale ideas

Post by labw.. » Wed, 02 Oct 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>I was told that there is way to take PEG,  dissolve in water...and then add
>some chemical (possibly Bisphenol A) to cause the solution to "gel" or
>"firm" up.  Is this possible and if so, can anyone give me some info on how
>I might go about doing this.
>Thanks in advance,
>Jeff

make your own PEG by starting with ethylene oxide.  add some ethylene
glycol as xlinker before polymerization.

OR...

Try peroxide catalysts

OR

use high energy electrons

OR (easiest of all)

seek a xlinkable PEG from a manufacturer

JB

 
 
 

Ravensdale ideas

Post by Brent Vier » Wed, 02 Oct 1996 04:00:00


One of the best ways to make PEG networks is to use an isocyanate-either
difunctional like MDI (di (isocyanatophenyl) methane) or trifunctional
(isocyanurate based on hexamethylene diisocyanate). These materials
react with hydroxyl groups to form polyurethanes. Obviousuly, one wants
the system to be dry in this case-the hydroxyls from water would be a
side reaction. One the network has formed, one could then swell with
water to get a wet "gel". Look up Polyurethanes to get more info.

I hope that this helps. ;)

Quote:

> I was told that there is way to take PEG,  dissolve in water...and then add
> some chemical (possibly Bisphenol A) to cause the solution to "gel" or
> "firm" up.  Is this possible and if so, can anyone give me some info on how
> I might go about doing this.

> Thanks in advance,

> Jeff

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Ravensdale ideas

Post by Sherry Bail » Wed, 02 Oct 1996 04:00:00


I agree, Klew's book was a cool storage device. She offered a tip which I kind
of obvious in retrospect, but which I hadn't thought of before to go with it:
Wipe your tissue blade/d down with an *** wipe (I use Wet Ones) at the end
of your work session. It reduces corrosion, makes your blades stay sharper
longer, and helps them cut cleaner.

(Someone else made a folder using an art postcard folded in half with one
piece of flat magnet to hold a blade, which is another way to go.)

Sherry

 
 
 

Ravensdale ideas

Post by Sherry Bail » Wed, 02 Oct 1996 04:00:00


Hi, Shane!

If you wanted to be a big hit, you could also come with a preassembled leaf
cane to hand out segments of to your students to go along with their flowers
and to show them one more option, not taught. (Just an idea!)

This is one of the ideas I have always thought would be a good workshop, glad
somebody else thinks so!

Sherry