The Cure For Pendant Swap-envy! (long post)

The Cure For Pendant Swap-envy! (long post)

Post by Rebecca Triplett No » Wed, 11 Sep 1996 04:00:00



The race to find a cure is nearing an end!  The check is in the
mail!  Well, okay, its finally time for the rest of you swappers to
watch for the mailperson, the pendants are in the mail!  Please
confirm that you've received them, I would also be interested in
knowing what materials everyone used and I would like to hear about
anything you learned from doing your pendants that would benefit
the rest of us.  I also would love feedback on my own.

When I started the swap I had no pendants made other than Henry
VIII.  But by the end of the swap I had many.  I have been slicing
off some pendants of each design I make and then reducing it
further for the big order that I have to fill right now.  So I had
several to choose from and my husband kept asking which ones I was
going to send out. I kept saying I hadn't decide yet.

My "Green Eyed Jester" that you'll be receiving was completed 5
days ago.  It was a giant cane (to me) over 5" wide and the depth
of a clothes pin (about 3").  You can laugh all you want about the
clothes pin but it was a great measuring tool.  Unlike a ruler,
which I've used in the past, I didn't have to mark the measurement
first and then move the ruler before I cut, I could simply lay the
clothes pin on or beside the clay and then cut around the ends.  I
constructed the whole cane in two days and reduced on the morning
of the 3rd day and again in the evening.  The first half of the
cane yielded 37 slices (whoopee!).  I like that part, its like
doing art work that reproduces itself!  My husband says its his all
time favorite (but its not my fav) so he talked me into sending it.

When I was reducing it I had a lot of waste on the ends.  I used
such a mish mash of different kinds of clay; mostly Fimo but also
Sculpey and Promat.  I'm trying to use up the clay that I have so
that it doesn't get old and hard and also so I can order CFC.  Some
of the clay that I used for the jester was nearly rock hard so I
mixed it with sculpey, and some of the sculpey was too soft so I
mixed it with promat (rock hard yellow and fimo). I taught my new
15 year old neighbor to mix, and knead it in exchange for clay
lessons.  I think we were both happy.  She also shared with me what
some of her peers like to buy in PC.  This was insightful and I
never would have guesses it (***agers, go figure)!

One of the foremost things in mind while mixing was consistancy.  I
really tried to make the flesh clay soft.  I mixed fimo and sculpey
but then knowing that it would reduce less than the rest (being in
the center) I actually add a bunch of sculpey translucent.  I also
drew the design with the face a bit  small in anticipation of this
problem.  The face still was stiff and test slices during the
reduction process revealed that the face was not reducing like I
wanted so I squeezed the middle of the cane in, to try and force
the face clay to get moving (it looked like an 8" tall hour glass)
and then work to reduced the rest working out toward the ends.  I
couldn't simply roll it to reduce it because the outer clay was
reducing but not the inner. You can see that I didn't end upwith as
much of his hat as I would have liked. The ends had black and white
jelly rolls but they're so small you can't really tell.  Next time
I try this design, in different colors, I will choose hard clay for
the hat and background color.

When I sanded and hand polished it (with the T-shirt I was wearing)
I noticed that it didn't seem as polished as my solid fimo canes
usually are so that may have been due to this mixture.

It actually is a very simple face (design). I usually like to
"cheat" by cutting the face in half and putting the two sides
together to make one whole face but I wanted to try a different
nose design this time.  Since the nose was a bit hard to do, I made
the other elements of the face kind of simple.

I mentioned, above, that I will eventually try this design again.  
I have learned more through the repetition of canework designs than
I have learned from any class.

I would expect that your pendant packages will be arriving Thursday
but wouldn't it be great if they came tomorrow!

What fun this has been!   --Rebecca

 
 
 

The Cure For Pendant Swap-envy! (long post)

Post by Elizabeth Copela » Thu, 12 Sep 1996 04:00:00


Could you share with us what your ***age neighbor had to say about
what her friends like to buy?  I know I'm curious, and I suspect others
would be too.



<snip>

Quote:
>..... I taught my new
>15 year old neighbor to mix, and knead it in exchange for clay
>lessons.  I think we were both happy.  She also shared with me what
>some of her peers like to buy in PC.  This was insightful and I
>never would have guesses it (***agers, go figure)!


 
 
 

The Cure For Pendant Swap-envy! (long post)

Post by Rebecca Triplett No » Thu, 12 Sep 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>Could you share with us what your ***age neighbor had to say
about
>what her friends like to buy?  I know I'm curious, and I suspect
others
>would be too.



><snip>
>>..... I taught my new
>>15 year old neighbor to mix, and knead it in exchange for clay
>>lessons.  I think we were both happy.  She also shared with me
what
>>some of her peers like to buy in PC.  This was insightful and I
>>never would have guesses it (***agers, go figure)!

Elizabeth,

I am happy to address this topic again because after I posted I
thought I made it sound like I was saying that there was no
accounting for *** taste and that was not what I meant at all.  I
just realize (and this pains me a little) that at 40 I don't always
recognize what a *** will like.  Don't think I wish I could go
back to being a ***, sheeesh, I was one and so I know 40 is so
much better!

I also want to acknowledge that *** taste is almost as diverse as
the locations in which they live.  Much *** taste seems to be
influenced by the trends/what ever is sanctioned as being cool.  
There are always individuals who follow no leader.  All this having
been acknowledged, here is what I've observed and been told:

My 19 year old son (who has his own place half way up the CA coast
from me) seems to like things that have African or Jamaican
influenced designs and colors (red, yellow, green,black, white).  
Some of the reggae music albums will show great examples of this
influence.  I also notice his attraction to any design that looks
kind of like a tattoo (perhaps this warrants a trip to the local
parlor to see what the ***s are interested in--we have a few in
our town, it is considered an art).

As I was teaching my 15 year old neighbor to condition clay and mix
colors, I marbled two colors and then sliced through to show her
the ends and how it should not look if its throughly mixed.  I
described the speckled sliced end as interesting but not something
I used and she told me that she and her friends buy and like slices
that are speckled that way.  I never would have guessed that
someone would want to buy something that could be slapped together
so easily.

My brother and his wife are foster parents of 16 and 17 year old
girls who seem to be attracted mainly to small cane slices (1/2" or
less) that are geometric designs of almost any color, rather than
canes that are pictures of something specific.

I hope I explained all this well and that it helps. What do you
think?  Are there any ***s reading this?  Chere, if you're reading
this can you add anything?

Rebecca

 
 
 

The Cure For Pendant Swap-envy! (long post)

Post by SHANEANG » Sat, 14 Sep 1996 04:00:00


If you don't mind I will just ***in on this and tell you about my ***s.
I have twin boys who are 14. They love the polyclay stuff and so do their
friends. As far as I know they like the cylinder shape beads from 1 to 2
inches long that are the front main piece of a tight neclace. The neclace
is strung on a piece of leather. The larger beads are followed up by knots
in the leather and maybe a few more smaller beads. Very simple stuff. My
boys also made their own pens for school and say they are the envy of
their friends. However, polyclay pens have not held up too well in the Jr.
High environment. (stepped on, thrown etc..)

My kids are going for very tiny detail with no decernable objects in the
cane work. Like designs that just have "cool" colors. Or earthy looking
stuff. No flowers or faces and things. They like s***clay beads. They
really LOVE to make it too.

Shane

 
 
 

The Cure For Pendant Swap-envy! (long post)

Post by sir.. » Mon, 16 Sep 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

>As I was teaching my 15 year old neighbor to condition clay and mix
>colors, I marbled two colors and then sliced through to show her
>the ends and how it should not look if its throughly mixed.  I
>described the speckled sliced end as interesting but not something
>I used and she told me that she and her friends buy and like slices
>that are speckled that way.  

I do to and I am a complete newbie and love the "marble effect" how do
yu get that?

Quote:
>My brother and his wife are foster parents of 16 and 17 year old
>girls who seem to be attracted mainly to small cane slices (1/2" or
>less) that are geometric designs of almost any color, rather than
>canes that are pictures of something specific.

Nothing personal, I like the marbeling... and the little pictures
while I am sure they are very complex... drive me crazy...
 
 
 

The Cure For Pendant Swap-envy! (long post)

Post by Rebecca Triplett No » Mon, 16 Sep 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>I do to and I am a complete newbie and love the "marble effect"
>how do yu get that?

The marble effect happens when to colors are mixed together.  They
will eventually mix to become one solid color but along the way the
two original colors "marble."

Quote:
>Nothing personal, I like the marbeling... and the little pictures
>while I am sure they are very complex... drive me crazy...

I appreciate hearing your point of view.  I like the look of colors
marbled together and I take it as nothing personal that you prefer  
the marble effect to the "little pictures."  I like the complexity
of the cane work pictures and geometric designs, which, unlike
marbling, can't be accomplished or taught in a matter of minutes.  
So my point of view runs not only to what I like to look at but
what is challenging for me to create.

Since you are a self described "complete newbie," I would encourage
you to purchase "The New Clay" by Nan Roche.  It provides beyond
the basics instruction that you need to get started (including
marbling, page 34).

Rebecca

 
 
 

The Cure For Pendant Swap-envy! (long post)

Post by Pauline Botelh » Tue, 17 Sep 1996 04:00:00


Luann, this sounds interesting.  Is this technique featured in Tory Hughs
video on faux stone, etc.?  I have a call into the National Guild to see
if they loan out videos, someone on this group said this was possible and
since I have just become a member, I thought I would look into it.  When
I called, however, no one was there---probably all at R.  Thanks for
publishing the technique here.
Pauline
Alexandria, Va.

 
 
 

The Cure For Pendant Swap-envy! (long post)

Post by Judy Anders » Tue, 17 Sep 1996 04:00:00


<snip>

Quote:
>I do to and I am a complete newbie and love the "marble effect" how do
>yu get that?

<snip>

One of my favorite combinations to marbelize (makes elegant beads) is white, a
little black, and bronze Fimo.  Don't over marbelize, though, or it loses the
effect.  My mom's favorite trick is to roll the three colors into snakes (the
black should be about half the size of the white and bronze) and put them
together.  Twist, roll, bend in half and twist, roll, bend in half and make
into a shorter, fat snake.  Cut the snake in half lengthwise and put the
rounded sides together, roll, and cut to make the beads.  Nice, interesting
pattern in sophisticated colors.  Mix with plain black and bronze beads, a few
gold beads for added measure, and voila!

 
 
 

The Cure For Pendant Swap-envy! (long post)

Post by Luann Udel » Tue, 17 Sep 1996 04:00:00


Another cool way to work with marbled patterns is to use 4-7 colors, or
even more, somewhat related, and manipulate the marbled pattern to get a
more agate-like affect.

For example, to get a layered agate look, mix and precondition all your
colors, say... a few shades of umber, a few shades of rust, a couple of
browns, some beige, some white, and several tubes of translucent (the
art translucent).  Roll them, twist them, reroll them, retwist them,
till you are close to the proportions of color banding that you want.

Then you can experiment with gently "untisting" the twisted tube,
alternating twisted parts with untwisted part.  The untwisted parts
curve back into wonderful striated layers resembling the loops and eyes
of agate.  This looks terrific on beads, covered pens, etc.  You can
actually use your finger to press & gently "wiggle" little areas in the
clay.    The colors mix, merge, form dramatic color "gaps", the
translucent emerges in funny spots like quartz....it's amazing!

You can imitate picture jasper, banded jasper, all kinds of agates,
malachite, etc. using this technique.

Luann

 
 
 

The Cure For Pendant Swap-envy! (long post)

Post by milt » Thu, 19 Sep 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> Luann, this sounds interesting.  Is this technique featured in Tory Hughs
> video on faux stone, etc.?  I have a call into the National Guild to see
> if they loan out videos, someone on this group said this was possible

Howdy Pauline...  In case the Nat'l Guild does not loan Tory Tapes, the
Northwest Polymer Clay Guild (sponsors of Ravemdale 96) does to their
members, without charge.  This perk alone makes a membership worthwhile.
The big bonus is the affiliation with a group of really dynamic people.

Tom in the Great Land

 
 
 

The Cure For Pendant Swap-envy! (long post)

Post by BDRA » Thu, 07 Nov 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
(SHANEANGEL) writes:
>I have twin boys who are 14. They love the polyclay stuff and so do their
>friends.

Hi! I've been getting this newsgroup for only a short time and never have
as much time as I would like to spend here (SIGH), so I'm still trying to
catch up on some old postings. But this reminded me of something & I
thought you guys might get a kick out of it...

Whenever I go on vacation, I always bring craft materials to "play" with,
because even though crafts are my life they are also my favorite form of
recreation and of course there's never enough time to do everything I'd
like to do.

So one time I was staying with my family at a hotel and the kids wanted to
go swimming. I brought along a sampler set of Sculpey colors and sat down
at a table near the pool to do some fooling around with the clay while I
watched my kids swim. I sort of expected to get weird looks from the other
people at the pool, but hey--that's their problem. I was going to have fun
my way no matter what anyone else thought.

Well-- to my surprise, little by little each of the kids in the pool
gravitated to my table and asked if it was OK to join me, and within a few
minutes I had a polymer clay class in session and there were no kids in
the pool!

Cute, huh?

Nuchi (AKA BDrai)

 
 
 

The Cure For Pendant Swap-envy! (long post)

Post by Eileen C. McDonou » Fri, 08 Nov 1996 04:00:00


Quote:


>(SHANEANGEL) writes:
>>I have twin boys who are 14. They love the polyclay stuff and so do their
>>friends.
>Cute, huh?
>Nuchi (AKA BDrai)

Cute, but expensive. When my kids were growing up, their friends would
show up and ask to "play". At Christmas time I would have a craft day
for no more than six kids (to keep it from becoming a clay fest) and
everyone made a gift for their family.
Now; whomever is my son's girlfriend at Xmas time; comes and spends
time with me working the clay. One I got into beadmaking, and she nows
makes and sells necklaces at college. Another learned how to cover
Xmas balls, she is now in Seattle working in a crafts store. His
current girlfriend is into beading also, and she is learning to cover
pens to sell at craft shows.
I guess it's true that boys look for girls like their mothers.(Just
don't tell my son that!!!)