will it melt?

will it melt?

Post by HonoBe » Thu, 25 Jan 1996 04:00:00



As a result of the constant quest to find new things to cover with polymer
clay, I have a couple of questions. Does any one know if the eggs that
leggs panty hose used to come in (do they still?) will survive the heat
and oven time to be covered with polymer clay? Would it be a good idea to
stuff some foil in it anyway to help hold it's shape? The other thing I
want to cover is a stapler. I know the old metal ones would be alright,
but the one on my desk at work is some sort of plastic. Anyone else ever
try this?  I  really want to try this. That office could use a good
shaking up.
 
 
 

will it melt?

Post by Sherry Bail » Fri, 26 Jan 1996 04:00:00


I am guessing that it MIGHT work, but it will be one of those either yes or no
questions I'm afraid -- TRY it and see! (Watch more closely than you
ordinarily do!)

I covered those plastic Easter eggs they sell in the spring (watch your after
Easter 70-90% off sales at Michaels!!) successfully for the most part. The
ones I got were softer plastic though, maybe even PVC, which might not react
the same. (I poked air holes in the ends with a darning needle to allow air to
escape -- the two I forgot to do this with swelled up and cracked the clay, so
I made them into "hatching" eggs, one with doll eyes in an opal gilitter
covered mass (mystery monster?!) and the other with a dragon-like tail coming
out -- very popular with kids!)

Bic pens and hair combs (the wide base part) have been successfully covered
with clay, so I guess the main thing will be what specific plastic compounds
are used in those particular items. Even if they melt, the replacement costs
of a desk stapler aren't all THAT bad! And the egg is free.

Remember to report back!

Sherry

 
 
 

will it melt?

Post by Ulrika O'Brie » Fri, 26 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>As a result of the constant quest to find new things to cover with >polymer clay, I have a couple of questions. Does any one know i=

f the eggs >that leggs panty hose used to come in (do they still?) will survive the >heat and oven time to be covered with polymer c=
lay? Would it be a good >idea to stuff some foil in it anyway to help hold it's shape?

I haven't tried it and don't know, but a suggestion in case you
try it and it doesn't work (and there might be other reasons
why it might not, even if the plastic will take the heat -- I'd
be concerned about even post-baking interaction between the
plastic and the polyclay breaking down the plastic...), you
might consider using actual eggs.  While chicken eggs are smallish,
there should also be sources for duck, goose, and turkey (heck,
even Ostrich) eggs, and if both the egg and the polyclay are
pierced in the same spot to let air out, it ought to work.

(I've been meaning to try making some cane-covered easter eggs,
but haven't restocked on round tooits yet...)

--Ulrika
--
On the other hand, the examined life isn't very lucrative.

 
 
 

will it melt?

Post by sel » Sat, 27 Jan 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
> (introduction snipped)  I'd
> be concerned about even post-baking interaction between the
> plastic and the polyclay breaking down the plastic...)

I agree.  I once cast a mold in polyclay, then tried to use it as a mold
for epoxy resin (envirotex stuff).  Long after everything else from the
resin batch was hard, the resin in the polyclay mold was flexible (like  
soft plastic).  I eventually pulled it out to see what would happen and
the epoxy then completed hardening (even changing shape slightly, though
it did still keep the pattern of the mold).  If you want to keep on
using the original egg as support, you probably will have compatibility
problems -- and after an experiment I made with acrylic plastic, I would
be *very* reluctant to heat most plastics to polyclay's setting point.  
(The acrylic didn't burn up or melt completely, but it certainly wanted
to revert to a nice round sphere after only 10 min at ~270.).  You might be
able to use it as a mold (covering the hard plastic liberally with a release
agent), then bake the polyclay by itself.  To cover the stapler (or the film
canisters someone else wanted to cover) try gluing the baked polyclay to the
hard plastic (maybe with some sort of non-permeable barrier in between?).
Just a guess.

Quote:
> You
> might consider using actual eggs.  While chicken eggs are smallish,
> there should also be sources for duck, goose, and turkey (heck,
> even Ostrich) eggs, and if both the egg and the polyclay are
> pierced in the same spot to let air out, it ought to work.

Someone in the Raleigh area did a goose egg covered with polyclay chips
to look like a millifiori glass egg and offered it for sale in my fav.
bead store.  It was gorgeous.

Pre-blown eggshells are supposed to be commercially available somewhere,
since they are commonly decorated in all sorts of ways.

Anyway, have fun (there's so much to do with polyclay!

Susan from Raleigh, NC

 
 
 

will it melt?

Post by Charles Nage » Sat, 27 Jan 1996 04:00:00


On the cover of the February issue of "Rock and Gem" are some beads made
Suzann Thompson--really quite beautiful.  I was wondering if anyone knows
how those little black "inclusions" in the faux amber (tortoise shell?)
were made?  I've chopped up pieces of "turquoise" to make medium-size
crumbs, cured them, and then mooshed (a technical term, I know) them
together with dark "matrix" to make a nugget--but couldn't figure out how
to get those little black speckles.
Thanks, all, for the good ideas that turn up on this list!
cheers!
charlie
 
 
 

will it melt?

Post by Cori Stewa » Sun, 28 Jan 1996 04:00:00


I know I know!! :)

I read an article in Ornament Magazine (maybe the same woman yer talking
about) that used FIMO to reproduce turquoise, jade, c***and even ivory
with all the striations etc...

When this woman made jade, she used the same black speck-like inclusions
to great effect.  Here's how.

She took some black FIMO, and crumbled it.  You know how it crumbles when
it first comes out of the package ... this might even be a good way to
use that old-stuff everyone complains about.  Then, she used the crumbled
black only on the surface of the gem, and not mixed into the mass.  In
some cases, she would cover the speck with a blob of flattened art
translucent FIMO, so that it would appear deeper, and different specks
would appear as if they were in different levels.

Good luck, try it, I did ... worked great!

-T. Shawn Johnson
(using Cori's account)

 
 
 

will it melt?

Post by David Edward » Tue, 30 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Black specks: somebody (Tory Hughes or Lindly Haunani) suggested rubbing
a piece of black polymer clay over a piece of screen or strainer and
collecting the little black specks that emerge.  This works, but it
doesn't help the strainer any.

David Edwards

--
____________________________________________________________
***  All is comfortable here at the end of the universe,
     surfing the Bretz floods and watching for buffalo. ***
            It won't take long; you come too.
____________________________________________________________

 
 
 

will it melt?

Post by Sherry Bail » Wed, 31 Jan 1996 04:00:00


"That woman" is Tory Hughes.

I took her workshop and saw her do this live and in person -- you are right,
the effect is cool!

For those with the resources, she has some very good how-to tapes out which
show her demonstrating about everything you can think of to do with clay!

Sherry

 
 
 

will it melt?

Post by kken.. » Wed, 14 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Quote:
>Someone in the Raleigh area did a goose egg covered with polyclay chips
>to look like a millifiori glass egg and offered it for sale in my fav.
>bead store.  It was gorgeous.
>Pre-blown eggshells are supposed to be commercially available somewhere,
>since they are commonly decorated in all sorts of ways.

I wonder how the clear glass balls that were all over the place this
holiday season would take to being the support for polyclay.   I was
thinking that one could powder it and build a nice vase-like whatever
of polyclay  sorta like this:  

                                         (_)

only not all the way up, and then when it was baked, carefully break
and remove the glass.    Or, for that matter, cut it with a glass
cutter, sand, and you'd have a nice polymer clay vase for a desk.
Depending on the use, you could make a whole desk set like that, using
hardware objects (like metal pipe caps from the hardware store.

One thing that hasn't been mentioned -- starting the clay off at
maximum temp will "set it up" fast, and timing may be everything...
perhaps plastic "molds" can be removed before they melt, and the
polyclay object put back in the oven to finish baking.  (bless its
forgiving li'l heart)

 
 
 

will it melt?

Post by Sherry Bail » Thu, 15 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Sure, glass Christmas balls are commonly covered -- I did one this year with
night-glow stars just touching each other at the tips -- in the dark you could
see thru the holes for a sort of three-d lace design.  Someone I know made
some lacey looking ornaments and broke out the glass so they were
"free-standing" which had a sort of wonderful "how'd she DO that" effect.
The glass is too think and brittle to try to make vases from it, I would
think, but I don't do much glass work, so maybe I'm wrong there. You can of
course cover OTHER glass objects, though.

Polymer clay doesn't "quick set" under high heat, though -- as it cures,
rather like earth clays, it actually gets SOFTER briefly and can sag. I would
NEVER put plastic molds in the oven unless you don't care if you lose them! I
believe plastic molds are often made of polystyrene, which is heat sensitive,
will melt at a lower temp than poly clay bakes, and which emits cyanide gas if
burned. If you use talc or cornstarch as a mold release, you shouldn't need to
bake the mold in place anyhow. It's fine to do to retain detail if you have a
heat resistand mold, but if you don't, don't mess around! (Well, that's what
*I* advise, anyhow!!)

Sherry

 
 
 

will it melt?

Post by Holly Sto » Sat, 17 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Hi,

One of the WEB sites has Christmase ornaments over glass ball
ornaments,  It can be done.

I saw them before Christams, and while surfing the other day I saw
them  again.  The instructions are included.  I think its either
Arlene Thayer's site or Margaret Briggs site.

I look and post the site later,

Holly

PS.     In case you don't have a browser I will list the e-mail address also.
        Maybe they will send you the info. :)

 
 
 

will it melt?

Post by Holly Sto » Sat, 17 Feb 1996 04:00:00


I found it,

The glass covered ornaments are at Arlene Thayer's site

Christmas Ornaments by Bev Laird, there is a picture and step by step
instructions.

        http://www.primenet.com/~athayer  - Polymer Clay Central

        http://www.primenet.com/~athayer/howto.html  -  Goes directly to the
how to page

        http://www.primenet.com/~athayer/ornament.html  - Goes directly to
the picture and
                                                                          instructions.

E-mail addresses: