Favorite custom colors?

Favorite custom colors?

Post by Lisa Peterso » Fri, 30 May 1997 04:00:00



After saving all the tips and ideas I got from the "brainstorming" threads
and looking at all the prepackaged colors of clay I have, I thought it
might be interesting to ask this question:

Do any of you have a favorite custom color you have mixed? If so, are you
willing to share the recipe to others in this group?

I'm going home tonight to experiment so that I can post something.

Lisa Peterson
--
Without Trucks, Minnesota Stops!

 
 
 

Favorite custom colors?

Post by Debi Ro » Fri, 30 May 1997 04:00:00


I had the strangest experience last night...  I was doing some baking
and a few of the pieces  *melted*.  Some of the clay was up to a year
old and had been stored in a plastic baggie.  

It was all very strange, it only happened to 2 of the colors-  I had
used a bit of one of the colors in a solid pendant and the pendant
leaked through a small hole.

In a way it's too bad I don't know how to duplicate this, the melted
clay retained it's color and took on a nice shine (although it stayed
a bit crumbly).

Anyone else ever experience such a thing?

Debi

 
 
 

Favorite custom colors?

Post by Dorothy Mcmill » Sat, 31 May 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>After saving all the tips and ideas I got from the "brainstorming"
threads
>and looking at all the prepackaged colors of clay I have, I thought it
>might be interesting to ask this question:

>Do any of you have a favorite custom color you have mixed? If so, are
you
>willing to share the recipe to others in this group?

Hi Lisa;

Great idea.  Here's my favorite:  

          It's one part Clay Factory bright red, and one part Clay
Factory Gold.  Mixed, this makes a beautiful copper.  This is especially
beautiful when sanded and buffed!

          My next favorite is to mix approximately four parts Clay
Factory dark red with one part white.  Depending on how much white you
add or don't add, you'll get beautiful raspberry shades.


 
 
 

Favorite custom colors?

Post by Meredi » Sat, 31 May 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

> I had the strangest experience last night...  I was doing some baking
> and a few of the pieces  *melted*.  Some of the clay was up to a year
> old and had been stored in a plastic baggie.  

> It was all very strange, it only happened to 2 of the colors-  I had
> used a bit of one of the colors in a solid pendant and the pendant
> leaked through a small hole.

> In a way it's too bad I don't know how to duplicate this, the melted
> clay retained it's color and took on a nice shine (although it stayed
> a bit crumbly).

> Anyone else ever experience such a thing?

> Debi

When you say "melted" do you mean it slumped excessively or flowed like lava
and hardened somewhere other than where it should have been?
  I have kept all the clays in various wraps and the best seems to be using
aluminium foil - it doesn't allow the plasticizer to leach out of the clay.
  To see if plasticizer is leaching out thru a plastic bag or wax paper, wrap your clay in whatever and set it on plain paper for a week.  You'll be surprised what happens...plastic wrap doesn't work! It leaches like crazy. I found this out when storing little bits in a small jewelry bags with the white panel on them.  After 1 day the white panel started smearing off.
  Anyway, could you explain a little better about what happened to your clay?  I would like to know.  thanks
  Meredith
 
 
 

Favorite custom colors?

Post by MDTM » Sat, 31 May 1997 04:00:00


Fimo fluorescent red mixed with white (proportions roughly 4 white to one
red)
yields a beautiful shade of c***pink......)  I may have also added a
tiny bit of yellow to it, but unfortunately I did not write down my
formula!  I also got a very nice chartreuse (wish I had a spell checker!!)
by mixing 4 parts white, 1 part Fimo green (the 'regular' green), and 1/2
part Fimo yellow....................

Great thread, let's hear some more recipes!!!!
Dora from RI

 
 
 

Favorite custom colors?

Post by Sue Hease » Sat, 31 May 1997 04:00:00


After the demise of Fimo brick red, I started to mix my own -
1 part red + 3 parts caramel. This gives a good terracotta (and I don't
mean the Fimo idea of that colour which is what they call dark brown but
the nice flowerpot clay colour). Add white to make it look weathered.

I make lots of smokey colours by mixing opposites - green plus carmine
for example, violet plus orange in varying quantities.

And for a gorgeous blue - blue Fimo plus violet - obvious but worth
mentioning.
--
Sue Heaser

 
 
 

Favorite custom colors?

Post by Tracy Sapperstein-Byrn » Sun, 01 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Sculpey has the most wonderful Terra Cotta color.  I just love it ... it
has a pearlessence, and is so striking when baked.

I've been experimenting with quartz ... pink, white & translucent ...
mostly translucent, a touch of pink. Mix them together, then after you
get the slightly streaky hue you want, add the white for the veining.
Don't mix this part too well as you want the vein pronounced.

This is a great thread, lets keep this one going for a while :)

Tracy Facey :)

Quote:

> After the demise of Fimo brick red, I started to mix my own -
> 1 part red + 3 parts caramel. This gives a good terracotta (and I don't
> mean the Fimo idea of that colour which is what they call dark brown but
> the nice flowerpot clay colour). Add white to make it look weathered.

> I make lots of smokey colours by mixing opposites - green plus carmine
> for example, violet plus orange in varying quantities.

> And for a gorgeous blue - blue Fimo plus violet - obvious but worth
> mentioning.
> --
> Sue Heaser

 
 
 

Favorite custom colors?

Post by Neari » Sun, 01 Jun 1997 04:00:00


I took a class with Kathleen Amt this spring, where she talked about
mixing ALL colors with Sculpey brilliant pink, blue, and yellow.  I've
been doing it ever since ... it really cuts down on clay costs to only
order a few colors!  One of my favorites is a soft teal made with two
parts blue, one part yellow, and one part white.

It's funny, all the art classes I had in school said that primary colors
were RED, yellow and blue, but I can make red with pink and a tiny bit of
yellow -- regardless of whether it's the kids poster paints or my clay!

Nancy

 
 
 

Favorite custom colors?

Post by SHANEANG » Mon, 02 Jun 1997 04:00:00


What a great thread! I'm writing these all down.

I'm hooked on the Judith Skinner blend and love these combos using that
technique.

CFC dark red to CFC black
CFC ocra to CFC white
CFC colbalt to CFC white

I really like the Sculpey III leaf green mixed into Sculpey III Navy blue.
I get a great hunter green with this.

Shane

 
 
 

Favorite custom colors?

Post by RinL » Tue, 03 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Ooh! Ooh!  Me too!  One of my favorite colors is a mix of Sculpey hot pink
and turquoise(or "the clay formerly known as Aqua"  ;P   )
If you do the Skinner blend, these combine to form a set of very lovely
purples.

Peace,

Karin

 
 
 

Favorite custom colors?

Post by DiannDes » Tue, 03 Jun 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
(RinLin) writes:

>Ooh! Ooh!  Me too!  One of my favorite colors is a mix of Sculpey hot
pink
>and turquoise(or "the clay formerly known as Aqua"  ;P   )
>If you do the Skinner blend, these combine to form a set of very lovely
>purples.

>Peace,

>Karin

>-

Ok, I give up, this is the 2nd time the *Skinner blend* has been
mentioned.  What IS the *Skinner blend?*  I can usually figure things out,
as I do do a lot of reading both on-line and off-line, but this time I'm
stumped.  Please help.

Diann   o?o
San Jose, CA

 
 
 

Favorite custom colors?

Post by RinL » Tue, 03 Jun 1997 04:00:00


 What IS the *Skinner blend?*

Diann,
The Skinner blend is named after Judith Skinner, who invented it. I'll do
my best to describe it;

-Take two colors that you wish to combine
-Condition them, then run each one through the pasta machine separately on
the thickest setting, to make a thin rectangular shape
-Fold each one into a triangle
-Fit the two triangles together to make a rectangular shape again,
overlapping slightly where they meet (so your rectangle is half one color,
half the other)
-Put this sheet through the pasta machine, on the widest setting
-Fold it over in half from top to bottom(in other words, the top part of
the sheet as it comes out of the machine, to the bottom of the sheet, not
side to side...this part is critical)
-Put it through the machine again, folded side first
-Repeat the last step as many times as you wish until you get a soft
grading from one color to the other(I usually do it about 15-20 times)

After this, you can roll it up jellyroll style, use it for shading in
canes, the possibilities are endless!

I hope this made sense...I sure tried!

Peace,

Karin

 
 
 

Favorite custom colors?

Post by Sherry Bail » Wed, 04 Jun 1997 04:00:00


snip

: Ok, I give up, this is the 2nd time the *Skinner blend* has been
: mentioned.  What IS the *Skinner blend?*  I can usually figure things out,
: as I do do a lot of reading both on-line and off-line, but this time I'm
: stumped.  Please help.

Judith Skinner came up with a way to evenly blend one color into another color
using a pasta machine. The technique is called (mostly) the Skinner blend
now. (We polymer clay artists are tyring to remember to attribute great ideas
to the source when we can!)

Basically, you roll out rectangular sheets of the two colors you want to
use. (A more advanced version allows you to make gradated rainbow stripes, but
you can figure out how from the basic approach.) Trim the sheets (probably at
number 1 setting on the pasta machine) to equal sized rectangles. Cut each
rectangle diagonally making triangular pieces. Swap one triangle from each
color, so you have two new rectangles which are half color A and half color
B. Overlap the two colors a tiny bit and press together to seal the seam.
Assuming your rectangle is in a vertical orientation, fold in half, top to
bottom, making sure no air gets trapped at the fold. Put the fold into the
pasta machine at setting 1 (keep it there) and run the folded rectangle
through. This will begin to blend the colors and will create a new nearly
rectangular piece the same size as you had originally (with a tiny bit of
distortion.) Fold top to bottom again and repeat. Keep doing this over and
over about 20 times or so until the colors blend evenly across the clay from
left to right. Do NOT at any point turn the rectangle sideways -- the blend
relies on mixing the clay from the triangles in one orientation -- so keep
folding top to bottom only, and do your best to "match up the corners".

(Obviously the clay needs to be well conditioned beforehand, and both colors
need to be the same consistency -- neither warmer or softer than the other,
for example.)

Diana Crick keeps the instructions and tips at her website.

Sherry

 
 
 

Favorite custom colors?

Post by Jeannine » Fri, 06 Jun 1997 04:00:00



writes:

Quote:
>Diana Crick keeps the instructions and tips at her website.

>Sherry

Judith Skinner also has it on her page with photos:

http://members.aol.com/polyannie/jasi.html.

Jeannine

 
 
 

Favorite custom colors?

Post by Dorothy Mcmill » Sun, 08 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>snip

>: Ok, I give up, this is the 2nd time the *Skinner blend* has been
>: mentioned.  What IS the *Skinner blend?*  I can usually figure things
out,
>: as I do do a lot of reading both on-line and off-line, but this time
I'm
>: stumped.  Please help.

       After following Sherry's directions (which are very good by the
way) you can then turn the pasta machine to a #6 or 7 and turn your clay
piece so that you can run it through on the side.  In other words, put it
through with the begining of one color  and run it all the way through
the second color.  What this does is make one long, long thin piece of
graduated colors.  Then, starting with either color (depending on which
one you want in the center of a jelly roll cane) carefully roll it up
tightly.  You can now slice off pieces which will show up the color
graduation beautifully.  Because the piece you roll up is so thin and the
graduation of color so gradual, you can really see it.
       If you want, after you roll out the piece on the thin pasta
machine settin, lay pieces of gold, silver or copper foil on it before
rolling.  Roll the piece up and slice for a beautiful effect.
       It's hard to write directions for this so if you are confused,
maybe I can e-mail you some line drawings if you need them.  Dotty in CA