Transfered inkjet business cards

Transfered inkjet business cards

Post by Patricia Barne » Tue, 07 Jul 1998 04:00:00



I've just had what seems to me to be a brain storm. Now since I'm new to
this group, this idea may have already been done, but then again maybe
not.
    Call it luck, fate, synthesis, serendipity, synergistic or
synchronicity, but I just read this past few days about using an ink jet
printer to transfer photos by using T-shirt transfers. I tried it and it
worked beautifully. Thank you Dotty McMillan. Then tonight someone
mentioned paper and clay. Then  I realized I needed to print out some
more business cards showing my NPCG affiliation. Then.......!!!sparks
flew, gears turned and I've got  them baking in the oven. Yes...my own
business cards transferred to polymer clay in living color! I can add a
hole in one corner and it becomes a key chain as well. A permanent,
keepable business card.
    I had previously designed my business card background with bright
red, yellow and blue flames by using a software program called Dabbler.
I imported this into Print Shop Deluxe which has a business card layout.
Using that, I completed the card with text over the background. Then
tonight all I had to do was flip it to horizontal in the PrintShop
options menu and print it out onto the T-shirt transfer.
    Next step was to prepare some Premo clay. I've used a transparent
layer over a gold layer 'cause I just love the Premo gold. I used the
transparent layer to let the gold show through, but I think I'll switch
to plain white and just back it with gold. After it is baked I'll
experiment with its durability and adding borders or other stuff to it
such as impressions on the back, or interference powders, adding a bead
to the key chain, making it into a magnet, and on and on and.......
    This seems to be the first new idea I've had in weeks and it is all
due to reading what  everybody is up to in the news group. Thank all of
you for planting this seed which sprouted up just like Jack's beanstalk.

    Goodnite to all--see you next time.

    Pattycake

 
 
 

Transfered inkjet business cards

Post by Robert Houghtalin » Tue, 07 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Yes...my own

Quote:
> business cards transferred to polymer clay in living color! I can add a

I want one,  please :-)

--
Robert Houghtaling
Sculpture and Design
P.O. Box 256
Los Olivos, CA 93441
(805) 688-7391


 
 
 

Transfered inkjet business cards

Post by RSPIE » Tue, 07 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Re Patricia Barnes >>my own business cards transferred to polymer clay in
living color!

What a COOL idea!  You don't mind if we all try it?!

Randi

 
 
 

Transfered inkjet business cards

Post by Fridaycr » Tue, 07 Jul 1998 04:00:00


That's a neat idea! My only concern would be that it could get too expensive if
many business cards are given out.  Here's an additional idea that I just
thought of after reading your neat idea: What about gluing a tiny cane slice or
other small clay piece to business cards?  It might keep costs lower, yet
demonstrate the skills, colors, etc. in the clay works.  Hmm.  now you have my
mind racing with ideas. lol      

Tami Friday

 
 
 

Transfered inkjet business cards

Post by Jadz » Tue, 07 Jul 1998 04:00:00


I thought this was an excellent idea but I hadn't thought of the expense.  Those
transfers aren't cheap thats for sure!  How about printing out a page from the
laser jet/whatever and taking it to the copy store and and photocopying the entire
page and using the copy to transfer?  Black and whites are cheap and colors are
only $1ish.  I believe you can get a few transfers from one copy so you could get
24 transfers for about a dollar.  Would that work?

Jadzi
Cincinnati OH

PS    I realize the photo copy would be backwards but I understand that if you have
the copy store personel make the copy you can have them reverse the image during
the copying process so it would come out fine once transfered.  Or if your using MS
Publisher for your design work I know you can flip everything so that it comes out
as a mirror image when printed.

Quote:

> That's a neat idea! My only concern would be that it could get too expensive if
> many business cards are given out.  Here's an additional idea that I just
> thought of after reading your neat idea: What about gluing a tiny cane slice or
> other small clay piece to business cards?  It might keep costs lower, yet
> demonstrate the skills, colors, etc. in the clay works.  Hmm.  now you have my
> mind racing with ideas. lol

> Tami Friday

 
 
 

Transfered inkjet business cards

Post by Cassy Cohe » Tue, 07 Jul 1998 04:00:00


That's a neat idea! My only concern would be that it could get too
expensive if
many business cards are given out.  Here's an additional idea that I
just
thought of after reading your neat idea: What about gluing a tiny cane
slice or
other small clay piece to business cards?  It might keep costs lower,
yet
demonstrate the skills, colors, etc. in the clay works.  Hmm.  now you
have my
mind racing with ideas. lol      

Tami Friday<<

Actually, that is what Kathleen Amt has on her business cards.  Or, at
least she did a couple of years ago at Ravensdale.  She had standard
paper cards with small canes slices on her work on each card.
   Cassy

 
 
 

Transfered inkjet business cards

Post by Dzeffre » Wed, 08 Jul 1998 04:00:00


I had written down in my dream notebook (ideas I come up with in the middle of
the night and jot down in a notebook by my bed...messy, somewhat outrageous,
but sometimes inspirational!) to glue thin cane slices on my
cards...unfortunately, my perfectionist side got WAY too obsessed with exactly
what cane would be representative of my work!  I have never made a cane I'm
ready to put on my card, but maybe after working through The Artists'
Way...<g>!

I love the transfer idea!  Why not make a sheet of them, backwards color copy,
and paint the entire sheet with LS.  Bake the paper and LS together, peel off
(wash off) the paper, and pass the whole thing through the pasta machine with a
sheet of clay for backing.  Slice, and voila!

I love the idea of keychains...maybe for extra special repeat customers, or for
purchases over $50, or to include gratis when sending samples to businesses,
or...

Donna in St. Louis

 
 
 

Transfered inkjet business cards

Post by Otterfi » Wed, 08 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Why not do some cards in clay and send them out to companies or shops you would
like to do business with...sort of a marketing package.  a poly clay card and a
cane or a bead attached so they can see WHAT the clay is if they are not
familiar with it!

 
 
 

Transfered inkjet business cards

Post by Sherry Bail » Wed, 08 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Oh, I would definitely save these guys for special use! (You want to make
STUFF, not just cards, right!) But it IS a really neat thing to do for other
clayers and special customers (or special PROSPECTIVE customers)!

And I think everybody would do well to have one as part of any display they
have at an art fair or exhibition, etc.

This group is so clever!!!

Sherry

 
 
 

Transfered inkjet business cards

Post by NOSPAMmarn.. » Thu, 09 Jul 1998 04:00:00


X-Newsreader: AWebNews

--

that those transfers aren't cheap (using T-shirt transfer paper??)

  Do you recall what Kathy Amt related in her Palm Leaf Book article
in Bead and Button (I believe a couple of issues ago) about using inkjet
for color transfers? Seems to me what was mentioned was rather simple,
but, I can't recall it this minute - perhaps this would work as a
solution?
  Meredith
--

 
 
 

Transfered inkjet business cards

Post by Arant » Thu, 09 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>  Do you recall what Kathy Amt related in her Palm Leaf Book article
>in Bead and Button (I believe a couple of issues ago) about using inkjet
>for color transfers? Seems to me what was mentioned was rather simple,
>but, I can't recall it this minute - perhaps this would work as a
>solution?

     Actually, I wrote B&B to question this article and never got a response.
The article indicated that you could use "clay coated paper" directly in your
printer.  Now I can just *see* the look on my husband's face when I explain to
him that I gunked up our ink jet printer with "clay-coated paper."  (After six
years as a computer analyst, you should have seen *my* face when I read this!)
And how do you coat paper with clay, anyway?  Liquid Sculpey?  If so, how do
you dry it?  If you bake it, won't it be too stiff to feed through the printer?

     I feel like a total dunce, here.  I read and re-read the article, but
couldn't find any answers to these questions.  Is there something incredibly
easy and obvious that I'm overlooking or missing here?
     --Triche

 
 
 

Transfered inkjet business cards

Post by Azmu » Thu, 09 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Clay coated paper (LOL) is not "polymer clay coated paper!  It's a special
slick paper, like you see in really high quality magazines that takes color
beautifully.  Your Office Depot probably has some; it's pricey in large
quantities, but some of the paper places now have smaller amounts for home
computer printers.  Polyclay coated paper...I can just hear (and smell) the
commotion it would cause in the laser printer type heat.  No wonder you were
confused!  But it might work with an ink jet.   Hmmmmm.
Cate
 
 
 

Transfered inkjet business cards

Post by Otterfi » Thu, 09 Jul 1998 04:00:00


i hope that we dont have any severely computer illiterates that read this
board..ya know like the guy who calls customer service for a cup holder
replacement...it was the cd slot on his tower!
 
 
 

Transfered inkjet business cards

Post by Echo » Fri, 10 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Nope the clay would plug the jets. and of course the paper feed rollers will
indent an raw clay. now if you make the clay paper thin and bake it first, then
is flexable and it will feed. But then how do you get the inkjet ink  to stick?

Lysle