My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

Post by Kat » Sat, 18 Oct 1997 04:00:00



Hi All,
I just found your group yesterday. I've been making beads for jewelry
and Christmas ornaments with Fimo and Sculpley for a while. I recently
bought a beautiful book - The Art of Polymer Clay by Donna Kato. Armed
with that and fresh inspiration from your posts I attempted my first
Millefiori cane (a Clichy Rose cane) last night. Attempted indeed. It
didn't look anything like the one in the book, though it was ...
interesting.
Today the is a spot on each of my palms about the size of a quarter
right under my middle finger that is SCREAMING. I guess a five color (2
blended) cane was a bit much to start with :) I understand all the
references to food processors and pasta machines now.
How long does this last? Is it a good idea to work more to toughen up my
hands, or should I wait? Do you use big food processors or the smaller
coffee grinder kind?
Thanks for your assistance,
Kat - who's going for a bit of ice...

 
 
 

My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

Post by Sherry Bail » Sun, 19 Oct 1997 04:00:00


You are using your hands wrong if you have a spot that hurts like
that. Condition clay by SQUEEZING with the whole hand, not by pushing onto a
lump with your palms. (Read Kato's description carefully, she describes the
best methods pretty well, but you do have to pay attention.)

Sherry

 
 
 

My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

Post by Jeanne A. E. DeVo » Mon, 20 Oct 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

>Today the is a spot on each of my palms about the size of a quarter
>right under my middle finger that is SCREAMING. I guess a five color (2
>blended) cane was a bit much to start with :) I understand all the
>references to food processors and pasta machines now.
>How long does this last? Is it a good idea to work more to toughen up my
>hands, or should I wait? Do you use big food processors or the smaller
>coffee grinder kind?

Fimo always does that to me. Which is one reason why I tend to work with
Sculpey. ;-)

The larger food processors are usually better - you can chop clay with a
coffee grinder, but you won't be able to do much, and the grinder is harder
to clean, usually (which means you'll have a problem when you go to switch
colors of clay). Look for one with a good motor, since chopping clay is a
little heavier duty than most food processors are designed to handle.
--
"Stop thinking about it as the Information Highway and start thinking
about it as the marketing superhighway. Doesn't it sound better already?"
- Don Logan, CEO of Time, Inc.

The Polymer Clayspot <http://www.best.com/~jaed/clayspot/>

 
 
 

My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

Post by Luluwhi » Mon, 20 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Kat wrote

Quote:
>Today the is a spot on each of my palms about the size of a quarter
>right under my middle finger that is SCREAMING.

Snakes...balls...snakes...balls. Being a buget pc er, I don't have a pasta
 machine and If I had one, I d want to make pasta.

I just grab the pc- make a crumbly snake, then make a ball...keep doing it till
 its conditioned. My hands haven't hurt yet...

Mare

 
 
 

My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

Post by Dorothy Mcmill » Mon, 20 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Hi Mare;
        You aren't the only one who uses just their hands.  For years,
Tory Hughes, Cynthia Toops, and Pier Volkous did just this.  It wasn't
until more recent times that they finally switched to using the past
machine.  Not only to save their hands, but to save time and energy.
         Using just your hands is fine, if you have no problem with
fingers, palms or wrists.  Unfortunately, for many people, conditioning
the clay often leads to major problems with their hands.  The pain from
these types of injuries can be unbearable.   I have several polyclay
friends who have had to stop working because of this.  So I would caution
anyone doing a considerable amount of work with the clay, to be careful.  

         If you are doing only a small amount of clay work, it probably
won't do any harm.  But if you are doing large quantities of clay, like
many of us, then I would recommend that you take the route that puts the
least stress on your hands.  A food processor and a pasta machine.
        There are other reasons for having a pasta machine also, one of
which is to be able to make beautiful even sheets of clay in various
thicknesess.

-

 
 
 

My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

Post by Rebecca9 » Tue, 21 Oct 1997 04:00:00


About painful hands:
If something hurts, rest it rather than doing more.  Ice, and ace bandage
if it is the wrist, aspirin or ibuprofen or acetaminophen until it starts
to feel better.  then start working gently, and stop before it starts
really hurting.  Massage and heat can help once the first day or two have
passed.

In general, working through pain will only aggravate and prolong the injury!

Becky Preston, (who dearly loves her pasta machine motor since her elbow
does not hurt any more...)

 
 
 

My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

Post by Sue Hease » Tue, 21 Oct 1997 04:00:00




Quote:

>Hmmm....I woulda thought working with clay GOOD for your hands- like those
> stress balls and such that rock climbers are always messing with. It cant be
> as bad as typing, though.

I think that providing you do not have any actual problems, this is so.
A friend of mine broke both arms and refused to stop using clay (people
in UK rarely seem to use food processors - even production people!) She
had a load of orders to fulfil and just went ahead, painfully at first.
She astonished her doctors by getting out of plaster in record time and
needed no physio after as the muscles were fine. (But i would suggest
only doing this on doctors' advice...) The doctors said it was due to
the working with clay.

After 15 years of clay, 7 of production for wholesale and no processor,
my hands are really strong. (But fingers crossed they don't collapse
tomorrow!)

Sue

--
Sue Heaser

 
 
 

My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

Post by HAMMERAB » Tue, 21 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
>If something hurts, rest it rather than doing more
>Ice, and ace bandage, >if it is the wrist, aspirin ....

Greetings!

I agree that when something is hurting one's bones, tendons, etc.  one should
 discontinue the action and do the above.  But the original post seemed to
 indicate that the clayer was getting maybe a BLISTER on her palm from
 massaging the clay by hand!  I don't think it's the same thing!  In fact, I
 have a spot on the inside of each of my hands where the act of  rolling the
 clay into first a snake, then a ball, then a snake, etc. has given me a
 callus, and I use both food processor and pasta machine for the real tough
 jobs!

Since these calluses have formed, I don't blister anymore and the rolling
 action doesn't hurt my hands anymore either.  Maybe those of us in this
 high-tech age just need to let our dainty little pattywinkers toughen up a
 bit?  When I first got my blisters, I realized how little real  "work" my
 hands do, compared to my husband (whose callused and workworn hands I love) or
 my grandmother who scrubbed clothes on a washboard, churned butter, beat
 carpets with a whip, etc.

When I think of how sore my hands were when I was a hand-quilter!!  Yeow!  
 Maybe I wasn't doing it right, but all the devices they sell to prevent
 needle-injury made my fingers  too clumsy to achieve that perfect
 12-stitches-per-inch goal.  Of course, now that I met polymer clay, I don't do
 that anymore.  <G>

Lynda

^~^~^~^~^~^ Full Heart, Empty Pockets^~^~^~^~^~

 
 
 

My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

Post by Kat » Tue, 21 Oct 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
> Fimo always does that to me. Which is one reason why I tend to work  > with  Sculpey. ;-)

I bought a couple of packages of Sculpey, what a difference! My first
clay purchase for this endeavor was the multi-colored Fimo set. As soon
as I use them up (with the help of a garage sale food processor :) I
will use Sculpey, except for the most intricate of millefiori canes
(another words - it will be a while before I Fimo again).

Quote:
> The Polymer Clayspot <http://www.best.com/~jaed/clayspot/>

Great site!

Thanks for your assistance,
Kat
* - * Please remove .NO.SPAM from my address to reply by e-mail. * - *

 
 
 

My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

Post by Luluwhi » Wed, 22 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Kat wrote

Quote:
>Do you make them in your palms or on a hard surface?

In my hands. They sorta contain the crumbly pieces. Also, try addind a little
 sculpey of the same color. This will "catch" the crumbly pieces and make it a
 whole lot easier to condition.

Mare

 
 
 

My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

Post by Byroni » Mon, 27 Oct 1997 03:00:00


Quote:
>I bought a couple of packages of Sculpey, what a difference! My first
>clay purchase for this endeavor was the multi-colored Fimo set. As soon
>as I use them up (with the help of a garage sale food processor :) I
>will use Sculpey, except for the most intricate of millefiori canes
>(another words - it will be a while before I Fimo again).

>> The Polymer Clayspot <http://www.FoundCollection.com/~jaed/clayspot/>

>Great site!

>Thanks for your assistance,
>Kat

While it is true that Sculpey is much easier to work with, there are also
 significant down sides.  Although many great caner (e.g. Kathleen Dustin) have
 executed wonderful canes with it, if you tend to have worm hands the cane can
 easilly turn to goosh.  Since I don't do much***, thats not a problem for
 me.  However, I still rarely use Sculpey because it is much weaker and much
 more brittle than Fimo or CFC.  Its difficult to makes things thin with
 Sculpey because of breakage, and it also has virtually no flexiblility after
 baking. Yet I love Sculpey transparent because it is the most clear of all the
 transparent clays.  So I guess the answer is pick the clay that best suits you
 , but keep in mind that different clays have different properties.
Roni
 
 
 

My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

Post by RSPIE » Mon, 27 Oct 1997 03:00:00


Roni,
I can't resist asking:  what are the characteristics of "worm hands"?

 easilly turn to goosh].  

I did notice that you wrote this late at night (and after a day of working with
 toxic substances!)

Randi

 
 
 

My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

Post by LynnD » Tue, 28 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
> if you tend to have worm hands the cane can
> easilly turn to goosh.

In my experience, having worm hands makes it well-nigh onto impossible
to make a cane at all!!

Sorry,  couldn't resist,   :-))

LynnDel

*"*-.,_,.-*"* TO E-MAIL ME *"*-.,_,.-*"*-
Please remove one Z from address.

 
 
 

My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

Post by Arlin » Wed, 29 Oct 1997 04:00:00


It's rather obvious the poor dear is disabled and I'm sure doesn't
appreciate you all making fun of her problems.  I also suffer the same
infirmity and am sick and tired of fisherman coming up to me (total
strangers, yet!) and saying, "Boy, have I got a job for you!!"
--
arline

please remove ** for email



Quote:
> Roni,
> I can't resist asking:  what are the characteristics of "worm hands"?


>  easilly turn to goosh].  

> I did notice that you wrote this late at night (and after a day of
working with
>  toxic substances!)

> Randi

 
 
 

My First Cane & Cane Newbie Questions

Post by Byroni » Wed, 29 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Randi,

Quote:
>> if you tend to have worm hands

I was trying to think of a clever response, but Arline beat me to it.  I guess
 all those polymer fumes went straight to my head. I wish these boards had a
 spell check---"boy du I knead it."
Roni