Calligraphy, anyone?

Calligraphy, anyone?

Post by Allan Holland » Thu, 12 Aug 1993 05:21:18



Does anyone out there on the net do calligraphy, or do interests in the
two media cancel each other out?

I do calligraphy off-and-on, well mostly off, but lately my interest has been
roused.  So in search of further inspiration, I'd enjoy corresponding with
any would-be or actual scribes.

Allan Hollander

 
 
 

Calligraphy, anyone?

Post by Cynthia K. Snod » Thu, 12 Aug 1993 22:35:02



Quote:

> Does anyone out there on the net do calligraphy, or do interests in the
> two media cancel each other out?

> I do calligraphy off-and-on, well mostly off, but lately my interest has been
> roused.  So in search of further inspiration, I'd enjoy corresponding with
> any would-be or actual scribes.

> Allan Hollander


Sure, Allan.  I'm an amateur calligrapher from way back, although my
interest considerably exceeds my talent.  I have lots of books telling how
to do it (I'm really just a book collector).

One thing I'm particularly interested in is using gold leaf and gouache to
try to reproduce the style of medieval manuscripts.  I'd really like to be
able to get the three-dimensional effect that I've read about where you
fill in a letter with some kind of gesso, then gold leaf over that to make
it raise up from the page.  Every time I try it with commercial type gesso
I can't seem to get a nice smooth surface--it's more like a mountain range.
 Have you (or anyone else) ever tried this?  I know REAL calligraphers
supposedly make their own gesso, but surely there is an alternative.

Cyndie Snoddy


 
 
 

Calligraphy, anyone?

Post by Priscilla A Meredi » Thu, 12 Aug 1993 23:16:17


Well as far as I know, one must make there own gesso to achieve good quality.
I have tried the technique that you describe with about six different types
of comercial gesso, but I finally gave up and got my great grandfather
to tell me how to make it.

Caligraphy has run in my family for many generation and it is a
lesson the eldest male son had to learn from early childhood
to carry on the crafy.  Yes, it is a pretty sexest request of
my family, but they have always stuck with the old english
traditions..

pris

 
 
 

Calligraphy, anyone?

Post by Cynthia K. Snod » Fri, 13 Aug 1993 03:36:42




Quote:
> Well as far as I know, one must make there own gesso to achieve good quality.
> I have tried the technique that you describe with about six different types
> of comercial gesso, but I finally gave up and got my great grandfather
> to tell me how to make it.

> Caligraphy has run in my family for many generation and it is a
> lesson the eldest male son had to learn from early childhood
> to carry on the crafy.  Yes, it is a pretty sexest request of
> my family, but they have always stuck with the old english
> traditions..

> pris

Is this a deep dark family secret, or can you share the recipe with the
rest of us?  I'd like to know how to do it right.

Cyndie

 
 
 

Calligraphy, anyone?

Post by Allan Holland » Fri, 13 Aug 1993 11:47:38



|>
|> One thing I'm particularly interested in is using gold leaf and gouache to
|> try to reproduce the style of medieval manuscripts.  I'd really like to be
|> able to get the three-dimensional effect that I've read about where you
|> fill in a letter with some kind of gesso, then gold leaf over that to make
|> it raise up from the page.  Every time I try it with commercial type gesso
|> I can't seem to get a nice smooth surface--it's more like a mountain range.
|>  Have you (or anyone else) ever tried this?  I know REAL calligraphers
|> supposedly make their own gesso, but surely there is an alternative.

I know that there are gesso substitutes that are used in alternative gilding
techniques - the favorite seeming to be PVA (polyvinylacetate).  But never
got as far as gilding myself, so I don't know if these will give the
three-dimensional effect you are seeking.

Allan Hollander

 
 
 

Calligraphy, anyone?

Post by Jean May Le » Sat, 14 Aug 1993 05:46:49


Hi Allan!  Yes, I do calligraphy, although I haven't done much of it
since my brother got married last year.  They asked me to address their
invitations in calligraphy.  It was fun, but got to be tiring after doing
a few!  I guess I'd say I'm an amateur at it...I sort of do my own style
and I just do it for fun.  I haven't gotten really into it by buying the
types of paper it should be done on and all that.  It's just been a hobby
for me.  But since I've been reading rec.crafts, I'm becoming more and
more inspired by others talking about crafts that I like to do too, that
I'm beginning to get back into it again! :-)  Well, I just thought I'd
throw my two cents in....Happy scripting! :-)
 
 
 

Calligraphy, anyone?

Post by W. J. G. Overingt » Fri, 13 Aug 1993 20:27:29


Quote:

>Does anyone out there on the net do calligraphy, or do interests in the
>two media cancel each other out?

>I do calligraphy off-and-on, well mostly off, but lately my interest has been
>roused.  So in search of further inspiration, I'd enjoy corresponding with
>any would-be or actual scribes.

>Allan Hollander


I am interested in Calligraphy, though am only a beginner.

I did a little many years ago, but have recently been thinking about
trying to start again, with a view to using the end product as art
work for having a negative letterpress printing block made for use
for making booklabels. That is, I would write in black ink, but the
finished booklabels would be, say, blue, with that which I originally
wrote appearing as lettering taking the colour of the paper, such as
off-white.

I used to have a 'card of pen knibs' which came with one penholder,
which meant that every time I wished to change pen knib width, I had to
dismantle the pen!

I am now thinking in terms of buying a quantity of penholders and
three cards of knibs, so that I can keep them set up and not have to
try (*it never REALLY works*) to wash black ink off a knib before
using Red or Green!

 
 
 

Calligraphy, anyone?

Post by Allan Holland » Wed, 18 Aug 1993 10:49:50


Well, since I started the thread, what do I do?  These days it's mainly
addressing greeting cards, though I have enjoyed taking a favorite short
piece of text and setting it calligraphically.  I guess what I'm interested
in there is simple and bold design with the text. (A good book, BTW, is
Layout and Design for Calligraphers, by Alan Furber.)  The scripts I
work with are foundational, uncial, and italic, and dabble in a bit of
gothic.  I seem to always use gouache, avoid fountain pens, and have
trouble working with nib sizes smaller than 1 mm.  Despite fantasies
of doing elaborate illumination someday, I think my current ambitions
are limited to new and interesting ways to address greeting cards!

allan

 
 
 

Calligraphy, anyone?

Post by Wendy Buckn » Thu, 19 Aug 1993 01:33:18



Quote:

>>Does anyone out there on the net do calligraphy, or do interests in the
>>two media cancel each other out?

No, not necessarily.  _Calligraphy Revies_ recently featured some type
designs by Julian Waters, who is using the Mac for type design.  Julian is
one of America's finest calligraphers.

Quote:

>>I do calligraphy off-and-on, well mostly off, but lately my interest has been
>>roused.  So in search of further inspiration, I'd enjoy corresponding with
>>any would-be or actual scribes.

Please feel free to contact me in e-mail.

Quote:

>>Allan Hollander

>I am interested in Calligraphy, though am only a beginner.

>I did a little many years ago, but have recently been thinking about
>trying to start again, with a view to using the end product as art
>work for having a negative letterpress printing block made for use
>for making booklabels. That is, I would write in black ink, but the
>finished booklabels would be, say, blue, with that which I originally
>wrote appearing as lettering taking the colour of the paper, such as
>off-white.

Do you have your own letterpress?

Quote:

>I used to have a 'card of pen knibs' which came with one penholder,
>which meant that every time I wished to change pen knib width, I had to
>dismantle the pen!

>I am now thinking in terms of buying a quantity of penholders and
>three cards of knibs, so that I can keep them set up and not have to
>try (*it never REALLY works*) to wash black ink off a knib before
>using Red or Green!

I have a great number of nibs, and only a few pen holders, and this is
true of most calligraphers I know (many of us are professional letterers).
A toothbrush and some dishwashing detergent work wonders in the cleaning
department!

What kind of nibs are you using?  Many of my colleagues prefer Mitchell
nibs, and their reservoir is detachable for cleaning.  My nib of choice
is Brause, but I really like the Hiro round head nibs as opposed to the
Speedball set.

Have you tried lettering with gouache or watercolour?  It opens a whole
world of possibilities (and archival soundness)!

If you are interested there are some mail order suppliers in the States
that sell calligraphic equipment that is virtually impossible to find
elsewhere, along with gilding supplies.

Cheers!

--

"Our aim, I think, should be to make letters live." -- Edward Johnston

 
 
 

Calligraphy, anyone?

Post by Wendy Buckn » Thu, 19 Aug 1993 01:36:25



Quote:
>Well, since I started the thread, what do I do?  These days it's mainly
>addressing greeting cards, though I have enjoyed taking a favorite short
>piece of text and setting it calligraphically.  I guess what I'm interested
>in there is simple and bold design with the text. (A good book, BTW, is
>Layout and Design for Calligraphers, by Alan Furber.)  The scripts I
>work with are foundational, uncial, and italic, and dabble in a bit of
>gothic.  I seem to always use gouache, avoid fountain pens, and have
>trouble working with nib sizes smaller than 1 mm.  Despite fantasies
>of doing elaborate illumination someday, I think my current ambitions
>are limited to new and interesting ways to address greeting cards!

Allan,

The spring (or was it summer) edition of _Calligraphy Review_ featured a
fine article on creative envelope addressing.  I think you'd enjoy it!

Cheers,

--

"Our aim, I think, should be to make letters live." -- Edward Johnston

 
 
 

Calligraphy, anyone?

Post by W. J. G. Overingt » Fri, 20 Aug 1993 21:38:02



Quote:

>>I am interested in Calligraphy, though am only a beginner.

>>I did a little many years ago, but have recently been thinking about
>>trying to start again, with a view to using the end product as art
>>work for having a negative letterpress printing block made for use
>>for making booklabels. That is, I would write in black ink, but the
>>finished booklabels would be, say, blue, with that which I originally
>>wrote appearing as lettering taking the colour of the paper, such as
>>off-white.

>Do you have your own letterpress?

Yes, only a small Adana 8" x 5" machine, but it is amazing what one
can do with these machines. The 8" x 5" is the inner measurement of
the chase, that is, one can almost fill that area with type or blocks.
The machine itself is a table top machine about 2 feet high, 2 feet long
and 1 foot wide.
 
 
 

Calligraphy, anyone?

Post by Wendy Buckn » Mon, 23 Aug 1993 01:00:42



Quote:

>Yes, only a small Adana 8" x 5" machine, but it is amazing what one
>can do with these machines. The 8" x 5" is the inner measurement of
>the chase, that is, one can almost fill that area with type or blocks.
>The machine itself is a table top machine about 2 feet high, 2 feet long
>and 1 foot wide.

Well, I'm jealous!  I'm sure I could make room in the studio (somehow) for
a letterpress (might have to make the living room the studio and have only
a small sitting/tv room, but I'm _sure_ it could be done).

I have a "toy" silkscreen type operation--it's not really offset, no
blanket or anything--made in Japan.  It's very popular with calligraphers
here, especially as a low cost method of printing a small number of
invitations, greeting cards, etc.  It is called a "Gocco" machine (the
word means child's play in Japanese).  You can achieve some very
interesting effects by mixing the ink on the plate.  Registration can be a
bit problematic, but it is worth the aggravation (especially if you design
around the problem).

Cheers!

--

"Our aim, I think, should be to make letters live." -- Edward Johnston

 
 
 

Calligraphy, anyone?

Post by Joanne Mannari » Wed, 25 Aug 1993 06:11:31


|> Well, since I started the thread, what do I do?  These days it's mainly
|> addressing greeting cards, though I have enjoyed taking a favorite short
|> piece of text and setting it calligraphically.  I guess what I'm interested
|> in there is simple and bold design with the text. (A good book, BTW, is
|> Layout and Design for Calligraphers, by Alan Furber.)  The scripts I
|> work with are foundational, uncial, and italic, and dabble in a bit of
|> gothic.  I seem to always use gouache, avoid fountain pens, and have
|> trouble working with nib sizes smaller than 1 mm.  Despite fantasies
|> of doing elaborate illumination someday, I think my current ambitions
|> are limited to new and interesting ways to address greeting cards!
|>
|> allan

I've been doing Calligraphy for the last couple of years.  I take an *** ed
class on Saturday mornings at the local community college.  The same group of
people show up for each session and I've really learned a lot from them.  I would
say I'm an advanced beginner since some of my hands need work.  I've
learned italic, uncial and gothic.  The instructor is very much into layout and
illumination.  She's given us some really good tips.  I've probably spent a
fortune on this hobby over the last few years.  I've done a few pieces on request
and last year did my first Christmas card which I had printed.  Addressing the
envelopes wasn't as successful, but I guess I just need practice.

I've got an idea to do a birth "sampler" (for lack of a better word) for my niece
and nephew who were born two weeks ago (they're twins).  I have a book of
juvenile borders which I'm going to use and would like to come up with a saying
and then put their name, date and birth weight underneath.  I want to do a
separate one for each of them.  For the girl I could put something like, "Sugar
and spice and everything nice...", but what would I put for the boy?  If anyone
has any advice on doing one of these I'd really appreciate it.  By the way, I
plan to frame the pieces after I'm done.

thanks in advance.

-joanne

--


 
 
 

Calligraphy, anyone?

Post by W. J. G. Overingt » Tue, 24 Aug 1993 23:48:00



Quote:


>>Yes, only a small Adana 8" x 5" machine, but it is amazing what one
>>can do with these machines. The 8" x 5" is the inner measurement of
>>the chase, that is, one can almost fill that area with type or blocks.
>>The machine itself is a table top machine about 2 feet high, 2 feet long
>>and 1 foot wide.

>Well, I'm jealous!  I'm sure I could make room in the studio (somehow) for
>a letterpress (might have to make the living room the studio and have only
>a small sitting/tv room, but I'm _sure_ it could be done).

Well, you've no need to be, because they are still being made in
England, people sell them second hand too and the manufacturer will
send them anywhere in the world.

The company is in Twickenham, Middlesex, which is just a few miles
west of London. Middlesex was a county abolished about 20 years
ago (maybe more) when Greater London was created as a Local
Authority area. However, it has remained as a postal address, because of
the ways of our Post Office system!

It is called Adana Printing Machines and I expect that a letter
of enquiry addressed to

Adana Printing Machines
Twickenham
Middlesex
England

will get there. The new ones are about 400 pounds sterling but a
second hand one can be less than half that as they have been making
them for years.

One can often see the adverti***ts for second hand ones in the
British weekly magazine "Exchange & Mart" (published every week since
1868 and containing only adverti***ts! (for all sorts of things))
which is widely available in newsagents shops.

Also, in Small Printer Classifieds which is sent out monthly to
members of the British Printing Society (of which I am a member).

Members are mostly located in the United Kingdom, but overseas members
are very welcome and there is at least one in the USA. There may be
lots, but I happened to notice the one as he wrote a letter to the
magazine Small Printer, which is sent out monthly to members.

Details of the society are obtainable from,

The Honorary Secretary,
British Printing Society,
BM/ISPA,
London WC2
England

This is just a forwarding address so that the society, run by unpaid
officers from their homes or businesses, can have a long term
permanent address.

Membership is currently 13 pounds 80 pence per year at present, but
might be a little more for overseas, but might not.