How To Make Iron-On Transfer Paper???

How To Make Iron-On Transfer Paper???

Post by MyNa » Sat, 12 Dec 1998 04:00:00



After a fairly extensive search on the net, I've come up empty on
ideas of how to make my own iron-on transfer paper.  I'm trying to
find an economical or easy way to make my own ink jet transfer
material from plain paper and common kitchen or hardware-store
supplies.

I have an older ink jet printer that just uses the plain color inks, I
suspect they are water and/or glycol based (?) as they tend to bleed
when they get wet.  I've tried various methods of using the printed
paper and using it like old fashioned kid's tattoos (like you could
get from Cracker Jack prizes), by dampening the cloth or paper and
then heating with an iron -- with little to no success.  I also have
access to a large surplus supply of transparency printer film for ink
jets (about $2.00 per 50 sheets). I'm going to see if there's anything
I can do with that too. Maybe by using some solvents from the hardware
store, like naphtha (lighter fluid) or denatured *** to dissolve
the ***d ink layer off of the plastic-backing and onto cloth.

Or does anyone know what material layers they use on factory made
transfer paper so I or others could experiment with household
materials to try to come up with something similar? I suspect it's
just a thin layer of a gelatin over some harder heat resistant layer
or something.  And just the gelatin (ink absorbent layer) remains on
the cloth after ironing.

Outside of my own failed or upcoming experiments, does anyone have any
simple methods they've found for transferring ink jet images to other
surfaces? (Even if it's only a temporary transfer when used as a
stitching or embroidery pattern.)  Surely some of you creative
tinkerers and crafty hobbyist types have found some things that work,
care to share?

Not only do I hate the idea of spending over $1.50 for one sheet of
paper, that could get ruined trying to get it right the first time --
but for someone like myself, that lives far in the country, has no
credit card for easy mail-orders, I would like nothing better than to
find an inexpensive solution that I can do at home. (Plus I really
despise being made dependent on some company's product for what I
might need to do.)  An easy method to make a transfer material would
be a boon to many, craft-persons, school teachers, and kids alike.
Please share what you know or think might work.

I wonder, if I softened wax-paper with some kind of solvent, if I
could print on that..... Or maybe by brushing a thin layer of gelatin
on plastic coated butcher's wrapping paper and letting it dry ....

What we need is an updated version of" Henly's Book of Formulas".  Too
bad he didn't have computers and inkjet printers way back then or this
solution would have been in print already.

HELP!!! :)

(to reply by email remove the spammenot from the address, but I prefer
your knowledge and ideas be shared publicly so we can all benefit from
them.)

 
 
 

How To Make Iron-On Transfer Paper???

Post by SilverSile.. » Sat, 12 Dec 1998 04:00:00


Try a web search for "Callie's Page".  This gal seems to be  just what
you need.  She has experimented and come up with all kinds of recipes.
I was really impressed with her glass-to-glass glue.  If she can do
that, she can do anything.  If you can't find her page, e-mail me and
I'll see if I can find the web address in my paper shuffle.

 
 
 

How To Make Iron-On Transfer Paper???

Post by SilverSile.. » Sun, 13 Dec 1998 04:00:00


http://pw1.netcom.com/~cracker4/index1.htm
 
 
 

How To Make Iron-On Transfer Paper???

Post by Peggy Da » Tue, 15 Dec 1998 04:00:00


I'm not sure how this might help; but you could go to your closest
feeding store where they sell syringes for vaccinating animals. If you
show them what you intend to do with them; they will probably not give
you any trouble.

I bought a tiny bottle {1/2 oz. approx} at Joann's craft section. It was
about $1.25. That might work as well. It has a long thin nose on it and
could pull up the ink with a vaccuum action.

Peggy

Quote:

> After a fairly extensive search on the net, I've come up empty on
> ideas of how to make my own iron-on transfer paper.  I'm trying to
> find an economical or easy way to make my own ink jet transfer
> material from plain paper and common kitchen or hardware-store
> supplies.

> I have an older ink jet printer that just uses the plain color inks, I
> suspect they are water and/or glycol based (?) as they tend to bleed
> when they get wet.  I've tried various methods of using the printed
> paper and using it like old fashioned kid's tattoos (like you could
> get from Cracker Jack prizes), by dampening the cloth or paper and
> then heating with an iron -- with little to no success.  I also have
> access to a large surplus supply of transparency printer film for ink
> jets (about $2.00 per 50 sheets). I'm going to see if there's anything
> I can do with that too. Maybe by using some solvents from the hardware
> store, like naphtha (lighter fluid) or denatured *** to dissolve
> the ***d ink layer off of the plastic-backing and onto cloth.

> Or does anyone know what material layers they use on factory made
> transfer paper so I or others could experiment with household
> materials to try to come up with something similar? I suspect it's
> just a thin layer of a gelatin over some harder heat resistant layer
> or something.  And just the gelatin (ink absorbent layer) remains on
> the cloth after ironing.

> Outside of my own failed or upcoming experiments, does anyone have any
> simple methods they've found for transferring ink jet images to other
> surfaces? (Even if it's only a temporary transfer when used as a
> stitching or embroidery pattern.)  Surely some of you creative
> tinkerers and crafty hobbyist types have found some things that work,
> care to share?

> Not only do I hate the idea of spending over $1.50 for one sheet of
> paper, that could get ruined trying to get it right the first time --
> but for someone like myself, that lives far in the country, has no
> credit card for easy mail-orders, I would like nothing better than to
> find an inexpensive solution that I can do at home. (Plus I really
> despise being made dependent on some company's product for what I
> might need to do.)  An easy method to make a transfer material would
> be a boon to many, craft-persons, school teachers, and kids alike.
> Please share what you know or think might work.

> I wonder, if I softened wax-paper with some kind of solvent, if I
> could print on that..... Or maybe by brushing a thin layer of gelatin
> on plastic coated butcher's wrapping paper and letting it dry ....

> What we need is an updated version of" Henly's Book of Formulas".  Too
> bad he didn't have computers and inkjet printers way back then or this
> solution would have been in print already.

> HELP!!! :)

> (to reply by email remove the spammenot from the address, but I prefer
> your knowledge and ideas be shared publicly so we can all benefit from
> them.)