Knitting Machines

Knitting Machines

Post by Mike Mil » Thu, 09 Jun 1994 02:58:37



I hope that this question is appropriate for this group.  My wife and I have been
considering buying a knitting machine.  The first one we looked at was about
$150 (U.S.) and was called dthe Incredible Sweater Machine.  A woman at a local
crafts store tols us it was a piece of junk and showed us a machine made by a french
company (I believe White was the name)  which did seem more impressive but carried
a price tag of $370.  I was hoping someone might have some input into either of these
machines or any other similar machines.  If someone actually has a knitting machine I
would truly appreciate if they could tell me about how useful it has been in the long
run.  Thanks very much to all.

Mike
---

 
 
 

Knitting Machines

Post by Jerry Park » Fri, 10 Jun 1994 01:25:55


Posting this from my wife:

Hiya Mike,

I'm a machine knitter - have a Brother 551 and a Brother 890 with just
about every attachment they have.  They are marvelous machines, and the
890, although out of date with all the newer high $$$ ones, can still
produce a lot of items in a relatively short time, in lace, multiple
colors, ribbing, tubular, jacquard, etc.

I've seen one of those Incredible Sweater Machines in action, and it is
not for anyone who *really* wants to do some productive knitting.  Any
ribbing has to be done by hand on the machine (my 890 has an automatic
ribber) and frankly, isn't much faster than by hand.  But I'm a very fast
hand knitter.  The plastic templates for using various yarns didn't look
too sturdy.  Check to see if you can order replacement parts.  For a
beginner, it may be ok.  I personally wouldn't buy one.

The White is a good brand for the most part.  Expensive in comparison to
the ICS, but their needlebed is at least constructed more firmly, and any
major dealership can order replacement parts.  That should be your
primary concern.  How to get pieces and parts.  What kind of accessories
will it take, and are they available to you readily?  Whatever you do,
purchase it from an authorized dealership.  If you're purchasing a used
machine, make sure the company is still supplying parts to dealers for
the model you buy.  My old 551 is from the 60's, and getting parts for it
is a pill at times.  But it's such fun to use, and it does do lace very
well with the built-in push-buttons and lever.

Knitting machines, new, can run you anywhere from $400 to $5000.  The
more toys you want, the higher the price.  It would be nice if you could
try some hands-on for both the machines you mentioned.  Just by the feel
and sound of the moving parts, you'd be able to tell if it has sufficient
quality.  If there is a Brother, Singer, Toyota, Knitking or Knitleader
dealership in your area, ask for a trial lesson.  Most shops will let you
come to a work-shop and test them out.  

Good luck in your quest!!

Marge

{replies to my wife should be addressed to my address:

sending but not set up for receiving yet from the server, since it's from
a new provider.}

 
 
 

Knitting Machines

Post by Melinda Meah » Fri, 10 Jun 1994 02:07:01



Quote:

>a price tag of $370.  I was hoping someone might have some input into either of these
>machines or any other similar machines.  If someone actually has a knitting machine I
>would truly appreciate if they could tell me about how useful it has been in the long
>run.  Thanks very much to all.

I have a Bond, now called a Bond Classic, which is the same as the
Incredible Sweater Machine.  I just do basic knitting; nothing
fancy.  You can do pretty much anything on it that you can do on
hand needles, if you have the right attachments, but a lot of it
will need to be done manually.

I would say that for someone who loves to hand-knit but wants a
machine to do the "boring parts", for someone who wants to knit
worsted or bulky weight (these are American weight designations)
yarn (which I'm not sure that a lot of other machines do), and/or
for someone who doesn't necessarily need their machine to do
everything by itself, an ISM would be an excellent choice.

One other note:  the ISM is totally modular.  No repair bills,
ever.  YOu just order the replacement part and replace it yourself.

Please feel free to email me with specific questions if you want.

Regards, Melinda

 
 
 

Knitting Machines

Post by Melinda Meah » Sat, 11 Jun 1994 04:51:08



Quote:

>Posting this from my wife:
>I've seen one of those Incredible Sweater Machines in action, and it is
>not for anyone who *really* wants to do some productive knitting.  Any

Maybe not, but I still think it has its place.  An ISM is around $100,
and if you aren't going to be doing scads and scads of project, but
just as a hobby (and not a passion), it's a great machine!
 
 
 

Knitting Machines

Post by Jerry Park » Sat, 11 Jun 1994 16:21:15




: >Posting this from my wife:

: >I've seen one of those Incredible Sweater Machines in action, and it is
: >not for anyone who *really* wants to do some productive knitting.  Any

: Maybe not, but I still think it has its place.  An ISM is around $100,
: and if you aren't going to be doing scads and scads of project, but
: just as a hobby (and not a passion), it's a great machine!

How true ... I'm more into the fancier and complicated knitting, and
therefore forget that others are not...sorry.  You're right, it does have
its place.  After I had my hubby upload that posting, I was wandering
through some knitting machine books, and realized that the ISM would be
perfect for those who just want to make a fabric from which to cut and
sew with a pattern.  I don't have a serger, so never really explored that
realm.  I forgot (sheepish grin) that *I* have contracted in the past to
make such a fabric yardage for a friend who has a serger.  The jumpers
she made were tremendously successful.

And a simple boat neck/drop sleeve would be very quick and easy
to do, without cutting and with a simple picot hem, would be finished in
no time on any functional machine.  I'm too spoiled with my machines and
all their fancy pieces and parts. :)

Marge

 
 
 

Knitting Machines

Post by Margaret Walk » Sun, 12 Jun 1994 03:46:26


I own two knitting machines. One fine-gauge and one bulkey.  I like my machines
a lot and don't use them enough.  I think that the one you looked at is made out
of plastic.  I paid $500.00 used for my Brother 930 fine-gauge and $400.00 new
for my Studio Bulky.  That is not including all the assories, like the ribber,
garter carriage and many other items you can buy for the machines.

Maggie

 
 
 

Knitting Machines

Post by Cheryl Kellm » Thu, 16 Jun 1994 02:27:54


I saw your posting and will be happy to share my experience.  I own the
ISM (Increadible Sweater Machine).  I saw the ad in several knitting
magazines (I used to knit by hand) and on t.v. and ordered it.  It
certainly is NOT a piece of junk!  It is a basic machine and not like
the more expensive "fancy" machines but it does quite a lot and easily
too!  

I used to dread knitting because of how long each project took.  With
this machine I made several sweaters in a few hours each!  I made
scarves and hats also.  I am not saying that it is as good as the more
expensive machines, by any streatch.  But to get the experience of a
knitting machine without a large financial committment, this machine
fits the bill.  Not to mention this it is easy to use and fun!

Also, if you want to do more complicated designs, you can with hand
manipulation on the machine.  I can do most any stitch, and most yarns except
very fine and very bulky.  I have tried successfully.  I enjoy my machine and
it has made me reenter the knitting world which I so dearly love!

Good Luck!


^   ^
*    *
= * =^
*    *
= *

 
 
 

Knitting Machines

Post by PJ Eva » Sun, 26 Jun 1994 07:18:06



Quote:

> I saw your posting and will be happy to share my experience.  I own the
> ISM (Increadible Sweater Machine).  I saw the ad in several knitting
> magazines (I used to knit by hand) and on t.v. and ordered it.  It
> certainly is NOT a piece of junk!  It is a basic machine and not like
> the more expensive "fancy" machines but it does quite a lot and easily
> too!  
> I used to dread knitting because of how long each project took.  With
> this machine I made several sweaters in a few hours each!  I made
> scarves and hats also.  I am not saying that it is as good as the more
> expensive machines, by any streatch.  But to get the experience of a
> knitting machine without a large financial committment, this machine
> fits the bill.  Not to mention this it is easy to use and fun!
> Also, if you want to do more complicated designs, you can with hand
> manipulation on the machine.  I can do most any stitch, and most yarns except
> very fine and very bulky.  I have tried successfully.  I enjoy my machine and
> it has made me reenter the knitting world which I so dearly love!
> Good Luck!

I can second this.  I have been very happy with my ISM (Bond Knitter).
I would suggest, however that you also invest the $40 for the table that
they make for it.  I set up a platform for it, but it turned out to be
not stable enough, and the thing fell over...breaking the machine into
lots of pieces...whereby I found another nice thing about the ISM.  It is
easy to repair.  It is not a complicated thing, but it is ingenious, and
not something that you could reproduce at home.  I feel that it has more
than paid for itself in the two years that I have had it.  Christmas
presents last year were all knitted, and quickly...saving hundreds
right off the bat. :)
 
 
 

Knitting Machines

Post by Alexandra D. Del Fierro Borle » Thu, 30 Jun 1994 05:40:29


I am not sure what the original post consisted of, but as a follow-up
to the replies:

I wanted a knitting machine for 4 years, before I took the plunge.
I studied the different quality machines, different manufacturers,
etc.  I constantly watched the info-mercials for "The Incredible
Sweater Machine".

In the end, I decided to go whole hog.  I bought the top-of-the-line
Brother 965i.  It has 700 patterns built in, computer interface,
and everything you could want.  It also came with free classes and
constant support from the owner of the shop.  From the shop, there
is the knitting "club".

I have heard horror stories from some of the women, about the cheapies.
At the same time one lady bought 2 old Brother machines with many
attachments and nifty gizmos, at a flea market for "$30".  

It depends on how serious the buyer is.  I would have started small,
but I decided I had waited long enough, and I wanted it all.  I have
considered buying a cheapy, for thicker yarn.

You have the fine->sport weight yarn machines, or the bulky sport
weight->chunky yarn.  Again it depends on what you want to knit.
I got the finer one, because I wanted to make clothes, but I like
making afghans, so I have looked into a cheapy, but I like the
features of the more expensive machines.

Another option is find a dealer in your area, because most people
that have the more expensive machines, upgrade.  So the stores have
these machines, at a good price, usually with some warantee attached.

The dealers, if you buy a used machine will usually offer classes,
at a reasonable rate, to help get you hooked.

Sorry to ramble, but this has become something I am very familiar
with, and love knitting.

Good luck

Alex.

 
 
 

Knitting Machines

Post by Rhona Gerb » Mon, 04 Jul 1994 08:46:30



: I am not sure what the original post consisted of, but as a follow-up
: to the replies:

: I wanted a knitting machine for 4 years, before I took the plunge.
: I studied the different quality machines, different manufacturers,
: etc.  I constantly watched the info-mercials for "The Incredible
: Sweater Machine".

: In the end, I decided to go whole hog.  I bought the top-of-the-line
: Brother 965i.  It has 700 patterns built in, computer interface,
: and everything you could want.  It also came with free classes and
: constant support from the owner of the shop.  From the shop, there
: is the knitting "club".

: I have heard horror stories from some of the women, about the cheapies.
: At the same time one lady bought 2 old Brother machines with many
: attachments and nifty gizmos, at a flea market for "$30".  

: It depends on how serious the buyer is.  I would have started small,
: but I decided I had waited long enough, and I wanted it all.  I have
: considered buying a cheapy, for thicker yarn.

: You have the fine->sport weight yarn machines, or the bulky sport
: weight->chunky yarn.  Again it depends on what you want to knit.
: I got the finer one, because I wanted to make clothes, but I like
: making afghans, so I have looked into a cheapy, but I like the
: features of the more expensive machines.

: Another option is find a dealer in your area, because most people
: that have the more expensive machines, upgrade.  So the stores have
: these machines, at a good price, usually with some warantee attached.

: The dealers, if you buy a used machine will usually offer classes,
: at a reasonable rate, to help get you hooked.

: Sorry to ramble, but this has become something I am very familiar
: with, and love knitting.

: Good luck

: Alex.
Glad to hear about your experience with the 965i. It is a fine machine. I
have had Brothers starting out many years ago with a manual bulky and
have moved upward as more sophisticated machines came on the market. I
have never been sorry about upgrading. If you want to make afghans, you
can do it with the weaving technique. You can use any weight or type of
yarn you want. There are several afghan books on the market, or you can
do your own designing -- more fun that way. Weaving is also a good way to
use up odd bits of yarn which tend to accumulate over the years.  Too
good to throw away and too little for a sweater. Do you know that you can
also interface a computer program directly with your 965i? rhona

 
 
 

Knitting Machines

Post by Leslie Rena Si » Thu, 07 Jul 1994 02:49:47


Hi I am looking to sell my mid-gauge Brother KH150 and buy a standard gauge machine with possibly a punchcard.  I like Brother machines but I am open to suggestions.  I like to design patterns and I have outgrown my Home Knitter.  Any help would be appreciated.  Thanks,

Leslie Sims

 
 
 

Knitting Machines

Post by Rhona Gerb » Thu, 07 Jul 1994 06:30:53



: Anyone else out there into knitting with silk????  It is absolutely
: 'yummy' to work with, but sewing up the seams is a bit of a pain!

I haven't done that kind of silk, but I did get a couple of cones of raw
silk.  I made a jacket and a poncho, which I generally live in in the
winter. Raw silk is most wonderfully warm. Only problem was all those bits
of broken cocoon made a horrible mess to clean up from the needle bed.

: cone at the hardware store for just a few $ and although it took a bit to
: ok.  I tried to do a lace stitch, but the lace carriage balked at it, so
: I ended up doing just a mock-rib and every 4 rows making simple eyelets,
: which still gave me the lacy effect and the stretch I wanted.

: Marge
Have you tried just leaving an odd needle out of work? That gives a nice
lacy look with no stress on the km.
rhona