Has anyone used Lacquer thinner for thinning Mr. Color ?

Has anyone used Lacquer thinner for thinning Mr. Color ?

Post by Mervin » Tue, 18 Sep 2001 23:25:25



Did it melt the styrene ? What are my other alternatives to using Mr
Thinner ?

Mervin

 
 
 

Has anyone used Lacquer thinner for thinning Mr. Color ?

Post by Giuliano Moschin » Wed, 19 Sep 2001 02:34:43


The second-best alternative to Mr. Color Thinner is Automotive (acrylic) Lacquer Thinner, with a Medium drying temperature.

You can get a quart can of the stuff at your local automotive supply store for about $5-6.

Note that this is NOT the same stuff that you find in hardware stores - that's nitrocellulose lacquer thinner, used for wood
finishes and the like.

However, it does have some problems.

The stuff is VERY hot, and will melt styrene - a drop will eat right through styrofoam in seconds.

You can use it for airbrushing, but caution must be used not to lay on the coats of paint too thick or too wet, as the thinner will
craze/melt your plastic. I would not recommend using it for hand-brushing.

Resin does not suffer this problem, as it will not react to most strong solvents, including Lacquer Thinner.

-Giuliano

--
Giuliano Moschini

Model Page: http://www.moschini.org/models/
RAAM Faq: http://www.moschini.org/raam/
Moschini's Modelshop: http://www.moschini.org/modelshop/
    -Your source for Mr. Color! (and Mr. Color Thinner ;-)

Quote:

> Did it melt the styrene ? What are my other alternatives to using Mr
> Thinner ?

> Mervin


 
 
 

Has anyone used Lacquer thinner for thinning Mr. Color ?

Post by Mark Wilso » Wed, 19 Sep 2001 07:01:57


On Mon, 17 Sep 2001 13:34:43 -0400, "Giuliano Moschini"

Quote:

>The second-best alternative to Mr. Color Thinner is Automotive (acrylic) Lacquer Thinner, with a Medium drying temperature.

>You can get a quart can of the stuff at your local automotive supply store for about $5-6.

>Note that this is NOT the same stuff that you find in hardware stores - that's nitrocellulose lacquer thinner, used for wood
>finishes and the like.

>However, it does have some problems.

>The stuff is VERY hot, and will melt styrene - a drop will eat right through styrofoam in seconds.

>You can use it for airbrushing, but caution must be used not to lay on the coats of paint too thick or too wet, as the thinner will
>craze/melt your plastic. I would not recommend using it for hand-brushing.

>Resin does not suffer this problem, as it will not react to most strong solvents, including Lacquer Thinner.

>-Giuliano

That might be brand dependent--eating styrofoam doesn't always equate
to melting styrene.  From my experience, you can spray lacquer thinner
no problem.  If you dump enough to cause a puddle, then I would
worry--but you ruined the finish by then anyways.  I wouldn't agitate
the fresh paint, but even brushing has gone fairly well with Mr.Color
and automotive lacquer thinners.  

Mark Wilson

The Sleeping Giant has awoken....

http://home.earthlink.net/~mmwilson2/

RAAM FAQ:
http://home.earthlink.net/~mmwilson2/RAAMFAQ/index.html

 
 
 

Has anyone used Lacquer thinner for thinning Mr. Color ?

Post by Giuliano Moschin » Wed, 19 Sep 2001 07:21:44


The quart of thinner that I have in house is Klean-Strip's "*** Lacquer Thinner - Primer Grade", #QLW202, which is rated for
"high solvency, medium drying".

Comes in an aqua-marine green 1-quart can, retails for about $6 last time I checked.

And while it does eat through styrofoam, I have also tested it on s***styrene.

I applied a few drops of the thinner to bare white styrene plastic, and in a matter of seconds (15-30) the thinner had liquified the
top layer of the styrene sheet. The sheet I used was the thickest I could find, approximately 1/16" thick.

And spraying is not usually a problem, no, not unless you spray heavy coats, such as sometimes with primer.

Which thinner have you been using?

-Giuliano

Quote:

> On Mon, 17 Sep 2001 13:34:43 -0400, "Giuliano Moschini"

> >The second-best alternative to Mr. Color Thinner is Automotive (acrylic) Lacquer Thinner, with a Medium drying temperature.

> >The stuff is VERY hot, and will melt styrene - a drop will eat right through styrofoam in seconds.

> That might be brand dependent--eating styrofoam doesn't always equate
> to melting styrene.  From my experience, you can spray lacquer thinner
> no problem.  If you dump enough to cause a puddle, then I would
> worry--but you ruined the finish by then anyways.  I wouldn't agitate
> the fresh paint, but even brushing has gone fairly well with Mr.Color
> and automotive lacquer thinners.

> Mark Wilson

> The Sleeping Giant has awoken....

> http://www.FoundCollection.com/~mmwilson2/

> RAAM FAQ:
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/~mmwilson2/RAAMFAQ/index.html

 
 
 

Has anyone used Lacquer thinner for thinning Mr. Color ?

Post by Mervin » Wed, 19 Sep 2001 08:49:58


Scary stuff ....

I'll probably stick to Mr. Thinner, eventhough expensive.

Mervin

Quote:

> The quart of thinner that I have in house is Klean-Strip's "*** Lacquer Thinner - Primer Grade", #QLW202, which is rated for
> "high solvency, medium drying".

> Comes in an aqua-marine green 1-quart can, retails for about $6 last time I checked.

> And while it does eat through styrofoam, I have also tested it on s***styrene.

> I applied a few drops of the thinner to bare white styrene plastic, and in a matter of seconds (15-30) the thinner had liquified the
> top layer of the styrene sheet. The sheet I used was the thickest I could find, approximately 1/16" thick.

> And spraying is not usually a problem, no, not unless you spray heavy coats, such as sometimes with primer.

> Which thinner have you been using?

> -Giuliano


> > On Mon, 17 Sep 2001 13:34:43 -0400, "Giuliano Moschini"

> > >The second-best alternative to Mr. Color Thinner is Automotive (acrylic) Lacquer Thinner, with a Medium drying temperature.

> > >The stuff is VERY hot, and will melt styrene - a drop will eat right through styrofoam in seconds.

> > That might be brand dependent--eating styrofoam doesn't always equate
> > to melting styrene.  From my experience, you can spray lacquer thinner
> > no problem.  If you dump enough to cause a puddle, then I would
> > worry--but you ruined the finish by then anyways.  I wouldn't agitate
> > the fresh paint, but even brushing has gone fairly well with Mr.Color
> > and automotive lacquer thinners.

> > Mark Wilson

> > The Sleeping Giant has awoken....

> > http://www.FoundCollection.com/~mmwilson2/

> > RAAM FAQ:
> > http://www.FoundCollection.com/~mmwilson2/RAAMFAQ/index.html

 
 
 

Has anyone used Lacquer thinner for thinning Mr. Color ?

Post by Giuliano Moschin » Wed, 19 Sep 2001 09:05:36


Yeah, generally I stick to Mr. Thinner for use with actual paint or primer, and use the inexpensive store thinner for cleaning and
other uses.

Can't go wrong with the manufacturer's recommended stuff...

-Giuliano

Quote:

> Scary stuff ....

> I'll probably stick to Mr. Thinner, eventhough expensive.

> Mervin


> > The quart of thinner that I have in house is Klean-Strip's "*** Lacquer Thinner - Primer Grade", #QLW202, which is rated for
> > "high solvency, medium drying".

> > Comes in an aqua-marine green 1-quart can, retails for about $6 last time I checked.

> > And while it does eat through styrofoam, I have also tested it on s***styrene.

> > I applied a few drops of the thinner to bare white styrene plastic, and in a matter of seconds (15-30) the thinner had liquified
the
> > top layer of the styrene sheet. The sheet I used was the thickest I could find, approximately 1/16" thick.

> > And spraying is not usually a problem, no, not unless you spray heavy coats, such as sometimes with primer.

> > Which thinner have you been using?

> > -Giuliano