Gum w. sulphuric acid

Gum w. sulphuric acid

Post by Roger Shou » Thu, 09 Oct 1997 04:00:00



I've been given a rather large collection of German stamps and catalogs for
rating them.  For a few of the stamps the catalog notes that their gum
contained sulphuric acid, that most collectors remove the gum, and that the
listed "unused" prices were for stamps without gum.

I have two of the stamps in question, unused, with gum.

Should the gum be removed?  How?

Thanks,

Roger Shouse

 
 
 

Gum w. sulphuric acid

Post by tgtc.. » Thu, 09 Oct 1997 04:00:00




Quote:
>I've been given a rather large collection of German stamps and catalogs for
>rating them.  For a few of the stamps the catalog notes that their gum
>contained sulphuric acid, that most collectors remove the gum, and that the
>listed "unused" prices were for stamps without gum.

>I have two of the stamps in question, unused, with gum.

>Should the gum be removed?  How?

>Thanks,

>Roger Shouse


The presence of the sulphuric acid can in the long run damage the
stamps. It is therefore adviced to remove the gum.
I suppose that putting the stamps in some half warm water will do.
Maybe it's wise to use two portions of water, one for washing and one
for rinsing. I'm only not sure how the ink reacts to water (probably
it doesn't) but I'm sure somebody out there on this newsgroup knows.

 
 
 

Gum w. sulphuric acid

Post by NEIL INS » Fri, 10 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
>Subject: Gum w. sulphuric acid

>Date: Wed, Oct 8, 1997 06:07 EDT

>I've been given a rather large collection of German stamps and catalogs for
>rating them.  For a few of the stamps the catalog notes that their gum
>contained sulphuric acid, that most collectors remove the gum, and that the
>listed "unused" prices were for stamps without gum.

>I have two of the stamps in question, unused, with gum.

>Should the gum be removed?  How?

>Thanks,

>Roger Shouse


Hi Roger,

The gum should be removed by soaking in luke warm water, then rinsing in clean
 water.

Unfortunately, after 60+ years, this is probably a moot point since the stamps
 are, most likely, already damaged. If the paper has acquired a brown color, it
 started out white, the stamps are damaged and despite their listed values are
 of little to no interest to serious collectors of Germany.

I hope this is helpful.

NSH