Postwar British Slogan Cancels

Postwar British Slogan Cancels

Post by b.ingra.. » Mon, 06 Jun 2005 12:59:28



In 1946, the British post office produced one slogan cancellation
related to the shortages of commodities: "DON'T WASTE BREAD / OTHERS
NEED IT." (It's not clear how one was supposed to share bread that was
not wasted. I understand from people who went through the shortages of
postwar years that bread was held in high esteem and certainly was not
wasted! Such a cancellation seems about as useful as the "Fight VD"
cancellations that one sees now and then.)

In 1948, there were two additional such cancellations: "LEND A HAND ON
THE LAND," AND "SAVE YOUR WASTE PAPER FOR SALVAGE."

Can anyone tell me whether there were any similar cancellations
produced in subsequent years? I am looking only for cancellations that
were aimed squarely at shortages of basic commodities, not such
"motherhood issues" as wildlife conservation and prevention of forest
fires.

Bob

 
 
 

Postwar British Slogan Cancels

Post by Rodne » Mon, 06 Jun 2005 14:41:06


Australia's contribution:
http://cjoint.com/data/gfh3om1iwS.htm

Source:
Western Australia.The Slogan Postmarks to 1983
Brian Whittaker
WA Study Group
Monograph No1

HTH

| In 1946, the British post office produced one slogan cancellation
| related to the shortages of commodities: "DON'T WASTE BREAD / OTHERS
| NEED IT." (It's not clear how one was supposed to share bread that was
| not wasted. I understand from people who went through the shortages of
| postwar years that bread was held in high esteem and certainly was not
| wasted! Such a cancellation seems about as useful as the "Fight VD"
| cancellations that one sees now and then.)
|
| In 1948, there were two additional such cancellations: "LEND A HAND ON
| THE LAND," AND "SAVE YOUR WASTE PAPER FOR SALVAGE."
|
| Can anyone tell me whether there were any similar cancellations
| produced in subsequent years? I am looking only for cancellations that
| were aimed squarely at shortages of basic commodities, not such
| "motherhood issues" as wildlife conservation and prevention of forest
| fires.
|
| Bob
|

 
 
 

Postwar British Slogan Cancels

Post by chris_do.. » Sun, 19 Jun 2005 06:49:48


Quote:

> In 1946, the British post office produced one slogan cancellation
> related to the shortages of commodities: "DON'T WASTE BREAD / OTHERS
> NEED IT." (It's not clear how one was supposed to share bread that was
> not wasted. I understand from people who went through the shortages of
> postwar years that bread was held in high esteem and certainly was not
> wasted! Such a cancellation seems about as useful as the "Fight VD"
> cancellations that one sees now and then.)

> In 1948, there were two additional such cancellations: "LEND A HAND ON
> THE LAND," AND "SAVE YOUR WASTE PAPER FOR SALVAGE."

> Can anyone tell me whether there were any similar cancellations
> produced in subsequent years? I am looking only for cancellations that
> were aimed squarely at shortages of basic commodities,

Wartime/post-war save it slogans (I know you only asked for the latter)
from "Collect British Postmarks" by Dr J T Whitney, British Postmark
Society, ISBN 0900214058 (6th edition), pp 158-9:-

1939: "Grow More Food"
1940: "Grow More Food"; "Kitchen Front"; "Save Waste Paper"
1941: "Kitchen Front, Cambridge" (I assume this means used only in
Cambridge)
1946: "National Savings"; "Don't Waste Bread"; "Britain Can Make It"
1947: "Staggered Holidays"; "Britain for Holidays"
1948: "Hand on the Land"; "Britain for Holidays" (used twice); "Save
Waste Paper"

The book abbreviates the slogans and doesn't illustrate them (though I
think one appeared in a recent posting here), so it's not always clear
whether they really are to do with economies. I've done a little
research and asked older people (hence the delay in posting), but I'm
still largely guessing:-

National Savings: Lend money to the government for reconstruction, and
don't fritter it away. NS was promoted heavily during and after the
war, especially in schools. Google this group for discussions on the
Anne and Charles savings stamps (but don't believe all I said, as I got
it wrong!).

Britain Can Make It: Maybe reduce imports by buying British, but could
be just about encouraging industry. We had lots of "Buy British"
campaigns well after the 1940s.

Holidays: From one of my older informants: People were asked to stagger
their holidays over the summer months instead of all going away in
August to even out the use of trains (few private cars in those days).
Presumably "Britain for Holidays" was to persuade people not to spend
money abroad, though I doubt that many did have overseas holidays in
1947.

Lend a Hand on the Land: Help get the harvest in. This was a popular
cheap working holiday on the farm for poorer city families for very
many years, not just post-war.

Don't Waste Bread: Presumably, don't throw it away just because it's
yesterday's or you cut more slices than got eaten. Cut loaves in
polythene bags were unknown and few people had fridges so it went dry
quite quickly. Also, some people cut off the crust -- my posher school
friends' mums did anyway, which I thought was a terrible shame, that
being the best bit. Someone who lived through the war _thinks_ that
bread was not rationed until _after_ the war.
http://www.j-sainsbury.co.uk/museum/ration.htm says July 1946 to July
1948 which matches the slogan.

All the above would have been major national campaigns and should be
well covered by newspapers, but I'm afraid I haven't had time to search
out any articles.

Chris