Old books and School desk w/hole for ink bottle

Old books and School desk w/hole for ink bottle

Post by Gillam Kerle » Tue, 19 Oct 1999 04:00:00



Quote:

> I have just recently joined this news group, and I know very little about
> antiques.  How can I tell if something is an antique and of value, or if it's
> not valuable?

You're asking for a lifetime's worth of education here.  I'd suggest
starting out by reading Emyl Jenkins' Appraisal Book (That's not the
exact title, but should give you enough info to locate it on Amazon.)
and a general price guide (I'd recommend Schroeder's).  Don't take the
price guide as gospel, but it's a start in determining value.

Beyond that.... read everything you can, visit every shop and show, hang
out here and ask questions, etc.  

 I am especially curious about an old school house desk I saw at

Quote:
> an estate sale, and some books.  First, the desk.  It's the old wood and iron
> kind they used to bolt into the floor, with the seat (hinged) in the front, and
> the next kid's desk in the back.

Hard to know for sure without seeing it.  My impression is that supply
exceeds demand on these, so, unless the ironwork is really nice, it's
not worth a lot.  You're right that it could be a nice conversation
piece, and that should be sufficient to justify the purchase if the
price is right.

 They also

Quote:
> have some old books:  

One of the most amazing resources on the Net (IMO) are the search
engines for used books.  I usually use <http://www.bibliofind.com>, but
there are a half dozen other options.  You can search their database  to
find out what used book dealers are asking for copies of the same book.
Two points to remember:  (1)  These are asking prices; you don't know if
anyone will actually buy the book at that price.  (2)  The details of
edition and condition can make the difference between a $5000 book and a
$5 book.  

Hope this helps.  Stick around.

GK

 
 
 

Old books and School desk w/hole for ink bottle

Post by WGBuc » Wed, 20 Oct 1999 04:00:00


I have just recently joined this news group, and I know very little about
antiques.  How can I tell if something is an antique and of value, or if it's
not valuable?  I am especially curious about an old school house desk I saw at
an estate sale, and some books.  First, the desk.  It's the old wood and iron
kind they used to bolt into the floor, with the seat (hinged) in the front, and
the next kid's desk in the back.  The desk part in the back actually has a
round cutout in the top layer of the desk for the old ink well (and a large ink
stain in same spot), and a long groove cut out along the top of the desk (into
the wood) to hold a pencil.  I want it for a conversation piece, but my husband
is leary about this, and doesn't think it would be an 'investment'.  They also
have some old books:  1) an original set of 3 boy scout books dated 1912, 2)
Pilgrim's Progress dated 1871, 3) WonderBook - Tanglewood Tales by Nathaniel
Hawthorne dated 1884, 4) the Works of Charles***ens dated 1870, and 5) Poems
by Thomas Hood dated 1871.  How do I know what to look for in old books?  Can
someone please respond?       Thanks

 
 
 

Old books and School desk w/hole for ink bottle

Post by Double D Auctio » Wed, 20 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>Hard to know for sure without seeing it.  My impression is that
supply
>exceeds demand on these, so, unless the ironwork is really nice,
it's
>not worth a lot.  You're right that it could be a nice
conversation
>piece, and that should be sufficient to justify the purchase if
the
>price is right.

(snip)

As with most items, locality seems to be the key.

I am located in the mid-west where there are many small towns
that each had their own country school, yet these desks are in
high demand here.

I was surprised, Gillam, to hear you state that there are large
quantities in your area.  Being far north where schools were
originally far between due to the wilderness, weather & small
population, I would have thought there would have been a shortage
of supply & they would be in high demand, there, also.

Seems it is all topsy-turvy.
Debbie

 
 
 

Old books and School desk w/hole for ink bottle

Post by 13 Ghost » Wed, 20 Oct 1999 04:00:00



 " I want it for a conversation piece, but my husband
 is leary about this, and doesn't think it would be an 'investment'. "
====
I think that if you and your husband are seeking investments that you
would be better off spending that money on a savings bond.
One of the many advantages securites have over "antiques" is
that they are liquid, you can get your money back out of them
with relaive ease.

Buy that desk and set about selling it to someone else and you will get
my meaning
very quickly. Cashing in a savings bond will entail nothing more than a
trip
to the bank. Selling something like an old school desk and getting fair
market value for it, whatever that may be, without going to the expense
of setting up your own retail outlet, something like an antiques store,
is a difficult trick to pull off. Not to say that it cannot be done.
But if you
have an eye toward making a profit on your "investment" then it would
be prudent to consider what the back end of this deal is going to look
like.

Best Wishes,
13 Ghosts

--
Posted via Talkway - http://www.talkway.com
Exchange ideas on practically anything (tm).

 
 
 

Old books and School desk w/hole for ink bottle

Post by Tracy Doyl » Wed, 20 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:


>  " I want it for a conversation piece, but my husband
>  is leary about this, and doesn't think it would be an 'investment'. "
> ====
> I think that if you and your husband are seeking investments that you
> would be better off spending that money on a savings bond.
> One of the many advantages securites have over "antiques" is
> that they are liquid, you can get your money back out of them
> with relaive ease.

> Buy that desk and set about selling it to someone else and you will get
> my meaning
> very quickly. Cashing in a savings bond will entail nothing more than a
> trip
> to the bank. Selling something like an old school desk and getting fair
> market value for it, whatever that may be, without going to the expense
> of setting up your own retail outlet, something like an antiques store,
> is a difficult trick to pull off. Not to say that it cannot be done.
> But if you
> have an eye toward making a profit on your "investment" then it would
> be prudent to consider what the back end of this deal is going to look
> like.

> Best Wishes,
> 13 Ghosts

> --
> Posted via Talkway - http://www.talkway.com
> Exchange ideas on practically anything (tm).

Speaking of investments, I'm truly sorry that I didn't buy Apple stock
when I bought my computer. It was at about $12-1/2 per share. What an ijdut.

RAGards,

Tracy
--
To respond via e-mail, remove the spamblocker from the address.

 
 
 

Old books and School desk w/hole for ink bottle

Post by Charleen Bunjiovian » Wed, 20 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>Speaking of investments, I'm truly sorry that I didn't buy Apple stock
>when I bought my computer. It was at about $12-1/2 per share. What an ijdut.

Trading at 73 5/16 at the moment.  But in the $12.50 days, all the pundits
were predicting the imminent demise of Apple.  The magic seemed gone for good.
How were you to know?

But back to objects as investments.  I buy to hold as well as to resell and
it's probably no secret I favor precious metals, mainly because properly cared
for, they don't degrade.  I bought a pair of Blue Ridge blossom top shakers
over the weekend (Blue Ridge is crud but I'm not averse to making a quick
$50 off them) which I will turn right away because they have those ugly brown
yellow age specks on them.  In five years the BR craze will probably be over
and I'd be stuck with a pair of sick-looking shakers if I kept them.

Charleen

 
 
 

Old books and School desk w/hole for ink bottle

Post by Susa » Sun, 24 Oct 1999 04:00:00


I sold carousel horses for quite a few years, and people would always ask
if it was a "good investment" or "what's it worth".

Somethings only worth what anyone will pay for it, and no antique should
be bought for "investment" You never know what the market will do
(carousel horses DROPPED in value) and you might be stuck with a very
expensive dust collecter.

On the other hand, if YOU like it and can afford it BUY it. You can't go
wrong buying something you like, can you?

Do you buy clothes for investment? Heck no! You buy them to enjoy using them!
Same with furniture/antiques.

My 2
Susan

 
 
 

Old books and School desk w/hole for ink bottle

Post by Gillam Kerle » Sun, 24 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> Susan, I really hope you are right about the carousel horse market.
> There is a big sale near me next weekend and I hope to come away with a
> small carousel horse.  I've always wanted one and I think now may be the
> time.

There was a classified ad in the local paper for a carousel horse.  Said
they paid $9,000 for it a few years back; asking price $600.  

GK

 
 
 

Old books and School desk w/hole for ink bottle

Post by Carol Milla » Mon, 25 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Susan, I really hope you are right about the carousel horse market.
There is a big sale near me next weekend and I hope to come away with a
small carousel horse.  I've always wanted one and I think now may be the
time.

Carol

Quote:

> I sold carousel horses for quite a few years, and people would always ask
> if it was a "good investment" or "what's it worth".

> Somethings only worth what anyone will pay for it, and no antique should
> be bought for "investment" You never know what the market will do
> (carousel horses DROPPED in value) and you might be stuck with a very
> expensive dust collecter.

> On the other hand, if YOU like it and can afford it BUY it. You can't go
> wrong buying something you like, can you?

> Do you buy clothes for investment? Heck no! You buy them to enjoy using them!
> Same with furniture/antiques.

> My 2
> Susan

 
 
 

Old books and School desk w/hole for ink bottle

Post by Carol Milla » Mon, 25 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Sounds like they thought they bought the real thing and then found out
when they went to sell it that it was a repro.  Either that or their
veracity is suspect. :-)

Carol

Quote:


> > Susan, I really hope you are right about the carousel horse market.
> > There is a big sale near me next weekend and I hope to come away with a
> > small carousel horse.  I've always wanted one and I think now may be the
> > time.

> There was a classified ad in the local paper for a carousel horse.  Said
> they paid $9,000 for it a few years back; asking price $600.

> GK

 
 
 

Old books and School desk w/hole for ink bottle

Post by jan » Mon, 25 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:


>> Susan, I really hope you are right about the carousel horse market.
>> There is a big sale near me next weekend and I hope to come away with a
>> small carousel horse.  I've always wanted one and I think now may be the
>> time.

>There was a classified ad in the local paper for a carousel horse.  Said
>they paid $9,000 for it a few years back; asking price $600.

>GK

Sounds like the $4500 cigar store Indian being advertised in
our local paper for $600...kinda makes you wonder, doesn't it?

Jan