removing stains from a clawfoot bathtub

removing stains from a clawfoot bathtub

Post by Dresde » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 05:28:28



Hi there!
I am trying to restore an antique clawfoot tub.
The porcelain is not bad, but the bottom inside has gone porous and is
holding grunge stains.
I have tried poulticing with straight bleach, scrubbing with Softscrub with
bleach, straight ammonia, and even a OOOO steel wool, but am barely getting
them to budge.
I am working outside in an open ventilated carport, and yes, of course I did
not mix the ammonia and bleach ;)
Any suggestions?
I would hate to have to resurface, as money is a bit tight right now, but
need to make this critter presentable to use in one of my B&B rooms.
This is our B&B, no offer to sell or promote, just wanted to show it off a
bit. :)   www.threeoaks-marshall.com
Thanks a million, folks, I know one of you has the answer to this dilemna.
 
 
 

removing stains from a clawfoot bathtub

Post by Kris Bake » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 06:36:46



Quote:
> Hi there!
> I am trying to restore an antique clawfoot tub.
> The porcelain is not bad, but the bottom inside has gone
> orous and is holding grunge stains.
> I have tried poulticing with straight bleach, scrubbing with
> Softscrub with bleach, straight ammonia, and even a
> OOOO steel wool, but am barely getting them to budge.

    Are you letting the bleach sit on the surface overnight,
    covered with plastic wrap?

    If not, try that.

    If that doesn't work, go to your local beauty shop supply
    house and get their strongest peroxide (it's a thick gel).
    Cover the surface thickly, cover that with plastic wrap
    and leave it alone for a few days.   The warmer the item
    is, the better.

Kris

 
 
 

removing stains from a clawfoot bathtub

Post by Dresde » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 08:40:26


EEeeeeeeek!
I just got back inside, I had left the bleach soaked towels in it for about
an hour, and it pulled rust through the porcelain and turned the bottom of
the tub a dark red brown yuck color!
Gack, now I have to try to get those out too.
Maybe those Home Depot resurfacing kits might be worth a try after all....
Will peroxide take out the rust too?
Oxalic crystals are not fazing it :(


Quote:



> > Hi there!
> > I am trying to restore an antique clawfoot tub.
> > The porcelain is not bad, but the bottom inside has gone
> > orous and is holding grunge stains.
> > I have tried poulticing with straight bleach, scrubbing with
> > Softscrub with bleach, straight ammonia, and even a
> > OOOO steel wool, but am barely getting them to budge.

>     Are you letting the bleach sit on the surface overnight,
>     covered with plastic wrap?

>     If not, try that.

>     If that doesn't work, go to your local beauty shop supply
>     house and get their strongest peroxide (it's a thick gel).
>     Cover the surface thickly, cover that with plastic wrap
>     and leave it alone for a few days.   The warmer the item
>     is, the better.

> Kris

 
 
 

removing stains from a clawfoot bathtub

Post by Kris Bake » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 10:00:44



Quote:





> > > Hi there!
> > > I am trying to restore an antique clawfoot tub.
> > > The porcelain is not bad, but the bottom inside has gone
> > > orous and is holding grunge stains.
> > > I have tried poulticing with straight bleach, scrubbing with
> > > Softscrub with bleach, straight ammonia, and even a
> > > OOOO steel wool, but am barely getting them to budge.

> >     Are you letting the bleach sit on the surface overnight,
> >     covered with plastic wrap?

> >     If not, try that.

> >     If that doesn't work, go to your local beauty shop supply
> >     house and get their strongest peroxide (it's a thick gel).
> >     Cover the surface thickly, cover that with plastic wrap
> >     and leave it alone for a few days.   The warmer the item
> >     is, the better.

> > Kris
> EEeeeeeeek!
> I just got back inside, I had left the bleach soaked towels in it for
about
> an hour, and it pulled rust through the porcelain and turned the bottom of
> the tub a dark red brown yuck color!
> Gack, now I have to try to get those out too.
> Maybe those Home Depot resurfacing kits might be worth a try after all....
> Will peroxide take out the rust too?
> Oxalic crystals are not fazing it :(

Yikes!
That surface is a lot worse then, if it's *that* porous.

I've had good lurk with peroxide on rust stains, but from the
sounds of it, you're better off resurfacing it and getting that
surface sealed.    Otherwise, I think that rust is going to keep
leeching through.  (I've got visions of a B&B guest using a
white tub, and seeing it turn dark and rusty an hour later.)

Read this first:
http://www.tubbyusa.com/

It explains the process and preparing the tub.

When I was very young, I rented an apartment with an
old tub like that....and the landlord had used an epoxy-type
paint on it.   It wasn't too bad.

Maybe you should think of putting a darker color on it?
Kris

 
 
 

removing stains from a clawfoot bathtub

Post by Gerald Cloug » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 10:35:43


Quote:

> Hi there!
> I am trying to restore an antique clawfoot tub.
> The porcelain is not bad, but the bottom inside has gone porous and is
> holding grunge stains.
> I have tried poulticing with straight bleach, scrubbing with Softscrub with
> bleach, straight ammonia, and even a OOOO steel wool, but am barely getting
> them to budge.
> I am working outside in an open ventilated carport, and yes, of course I did
> not mix the ammonia and bleach ;)
> Any suggestions?
> I would hate to have to resurface, as money is a bit tight right now, but
> need to make this critter presentable to use in one of my B&B rooms.
> This is our B&B, no offer to sell or promote, just wanted to show it off a
> bit. :)   www.threeoaks-marshall.com
> Thanks a million, folks, I know one of you has the answer to this dilemna.

The absolute best product we've found for removing stains from tubs is
D-Lete-Germ. Check hardware stores. Measurably better than CLR.

I see by a later post that you're considering refinishing. First, forget
the do-it-yourself kits. It's hard enough for the professionals to get
it right. All the refinishers talk like it's a special process, but it's
all just epoxy paint. You have to be very careful about cleaning, and
any mistake in prepping the surface will make for a bad job.

If you decide it's necessary to refinish, the only good refinish we've
found for old tubs is powder coat. Powder coating is commonly used on
such things as ornamental iron fences. It's a fine powder that's applied
and baked. It's tough and resiliant, more tough than the original
porcelain. The shop will sandblast the tub, which will tear off some
spots of porcelain, which they will fill and sand.

You will probably have trouble finding anyone doing powder coat who has
done a tub. But it really is the only finish that will hold up well.

Try the D-Lete-Germ first, though. And don't be too critical of the tub
when it's out in the sunlight. Many obvious flaws, including where you
might have to patch with the filler made to repair porcelain, will not
show much in bathroom light.

If the tub's too far gone, and you don't want to refinish, it's probably
easier to find another tub in decent condition.
--
                       Gerald Clough

"Nothing has any value, unless you know you can give it up."

 
 
 

removing stains from a clawfoot bathtub

Post by Dresde » Thu, 03 Jul 2003 06:48:30


Many thanks Gerald and Kris :)
It would be a bear to find a powder coating place within a hundred miles of
here, as we are on the border of E Texas and Louisiana, in a very small
town.
I think I will give the TubbyUSA stuff a try, and yes, do it in a color,
which I always liked better anyway.
This *was* the best tub I could find around here at the price, and I will
give it a shot I think.
Thanks for your time and suggestions, I appreciate it.
 
 
 

removing stains from a clawfoot bathtub

Post by cynthia mas » Fri, 04 Jul 2003 10:49:05


If you will mix sodium perborate (available from a local ***tore) and
peroxide for bleaching hair -10%- andmake a paste.  lLeave it on
overnight and rinse!!  Try it!!  It works in our rent houses.  Porcelain
chips  or spots can be covered with non slip ***ized butterflies or
other motifs.