Yellow dishes

Yellow dishes

Post by David Ada » Fri, 23 Apr 1993 19:36:33





|>
|> Last week, I posted a whimsical recipe for Old Bachelor's Doughnuts.  I

|> inquiring about a specific detail of that recipe.  I tried to email a
|> response to her, but it bounced.  Since I couldn't answer her question
|> anyway, I thought I would see if anyone on the net has an answer.
|> Hopefully, she will see the responses here, since I can't communitcate
|> with her by email (sorry about that, Kathy).
|>
|> The thing that piqued her interest about that recipe was that it
|> specifically called for the use of a 'yellow bowl'.  I had noticed that
|> detail also, but I ascribed it to the tongue-in-cheek approach that the
|> recipe had.  However, Kathy told me that she has a cookbook that dates
|> (probably) from the early 1900's, and many recipes in it call for the
|> use of yellow dishes in the preparation of the food.
|>
|> So, the questions to all of you food-historians out there are:
|>
|> Why were our great-great-grandparents so fascinated with yellow
|> dishes?  Was it an amusing superstition?  Were yellow dishes supposed
|> to impart magical properties to food prepared in them?  Was this
|> fixation for yellow dishes limited to the US, or did some immigrants
|> bring it from The Old Country?
|>
|> darin

|> ________________________________
|> |                              |
|> | I will be President for food |
|> |______________________________|
|
|Hi Darin
|
|Someone over in rec.food.historic may know the answer.
|

Maybe someone over in rec.antiques will know the answer.  ;^)

---

They moved all the streets around while you were sleeping last night.  

 
 
 

Yellow dishes

Post by mo.. » Fri, 23 Apr 1993 23:02:08


         [material deleted for brevity]

Quote:
> |> The thing that piqued her interest about that recipe was that it
> |> specifically called for the use of a 'yellow bowl'.  I had noticed that
> |> detail also, but I ascribed it to the tongue-in-cheek approach that the
> |> recipe had.  However, Kathy told me that she has a cookbook that dates
> |> (probably) from the early 1900's, and many recipes in it call for the
> |> use of yellow dishes in the preparation of the food.
> |>
> |> So, the questions to all of you food-historians out there are:
> |>
> |> Why were our great-great-grandparents so fascinated with yellow
> |> dishes?  Was it an amusing superstition?  Were yellow dishes supposed
> |> to impart magical properties to food prepared in them?  Was this
> |> fixation for yellow dishes limited to the US, or did some immigrants
> |> bring it from The Old Country?
> |>
> |> darin

> |Hi Darin
> |
> |Someone over in rec.food.historic may know the answer.
> Maybe someone over in rec.antiques will know the answer.  ;^)


Yellowware (as it is termed)  is most often a plain type of
earthenware. It received its name from the color of the clay used
in its manufacture. Pieces may vary from buff to yellow to nearly
brown; the glaze itself is usually clear.  Some yellowware was
decorated with blue, white, brown, or black bands.  It is rarely
relief-molded.  Yellowware was made to a large extend in East
Liverpool, Ohio, but other Ohio potteries as well as some in Penn-
sylvania, New Jersey, and Vermont also produced it.  Because it
was seldom marked, it is difficult to identify the original manu-
facturer.  English yellowware has a harder body composition.  There
is a growing interest in this type of pottery, and prices are slowly
rising.

For more information, you could consult:
_Collecting Yellow Ware_ by Lisa S. McAllister & John L. Michel,
Collector Books, Box 3009, Paducah, KY  42002-3009.
_Kitchen Antiques_ by Kathryn McNerney, same.

And some books on stoneware or country stoneware talk about it.

Good luck.
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Yellow dishes

Post by pet » Sat, 24 Apr 1993 11:03:00








`         [material deleted for brevity]
`> |> The thing that piqued her interest about that recipe was that it
`> |> specifically called for the use of a 'yellow bowl'.  I had noticed that
`> |> detail also, but I ascribed it to the tongue-in-cheek approach that the
`> |> recipe had.  However, Kathy told me that she has a cookbook that dates
`> |> (probably) from the early 1900's, and many recipes in it call for the
`> |> use of yellow dishes in the preparation of the food.
`> |>
`> |> Why were our great-great-grandparents so fascinated with yellow
`> |> dishes?  Was it an amusing superstition?  Were yellow dishes supposed
`> |> to impart magical properties to food prepared in them?  Was this
`> |> fixation for yellow dishes limited to the US, or did some immigrants
`> |> bring it from The Old Country?
`
`Yellowware (as it is termed)  is most often a plain type of
`earthenware. It received its name from the color of the clay used
`in its manufacture. Pieces may vary from buff to yellow to nearly
`brown; the glaze itself is usually clear.  Some yellowware was
`decorated with blue, white, brown, or black bands.  It is rarely
`relief-molded.  Yellowware was made to a large extend in East
`Liverpool, Ohio, but other Ohio potteries as well as some in Penn-
`sylvania, New Jersey, and Vermont also produced it.  Because it
`was seldom marked, it is difficult to identify the original manu-
`facturer.  English yellowware has a harder body composition.  There
`is a growing interest in this type of pottery, and prices are slowly
`rising.

Ah. So then, perhaps the requirement for a yellow bowl would be just
a description of the type of container, like `whip in a copper bowl'
or `fry in a cast iron pan'. Even so, this seems like more detail than
is neccessary.

`
`
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Yellow dishes

Post by mo.. » Sun, 25 Apr 1993 01:14:57


Yes, saying "in a yellow bowl" is a lot like saying "whip 2 egg
white in a copper bowl..."  That's a good analogy.

In the meantime, for those of us who enjoy trivia, I found some
more information in _American Country Antiques_ by Don & Carol
Raycraft, 9th ed., p. 93, in section on "Yellowware" written by
Barry & Lisa McAllister:  

"Yellowware is a soft-bodied pottery defined by the color of the
clay, which can vary from buff to pumpkin in color when fired.
Yellowware was first introduced in England and Scotland around
1780 and in the United States around 1830;  it is still being
peoduced today.  The most desirable yellowware examples are the
fairly primitive and mocha-decorated pieces produced between
1840 and 1930 in the United States and England.
        Yellowware is usually covered by a clear alkaline or
led glaze, although sometimes the glaze will be yellowish in
color.  A lot of the yellowware produced was plain in design.
Other pieces were decorated with various combinations of colored
slip, mocha, and colored glazes.  Most yellowware is not marked,
which makes identifying the maker and place of origin very
confusing.
        While prices of all yellowware are on the rise, prices
for mocha-decorated varieties have increased the most, nearly
doubling in the past year [1990- NLS].  The demand for yellowware
and the scarcity of good pieces has necessitated the buying of
repaired pieces.  There is nothing wrong with buying a repaired
piece if 1) the damage is reflected in the price and 2) the
person you are buying it from tells you it has been repaired.
Make it a point to weigh all factors carefully when buying a
piece with a repair or one with more than minor damage, but
bemember that yellowware is a soft-bodied, utilitarian pottery
that was used in the kitchen every day.  It was not something
that sat on a shelf for decorative purposes.  It is unrealistic
to think you can fill a cupboard with rare and wonderful items,
all in 'perfect' condition."
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|  N. L. Sliker, Director   /|  Engineering Computing                       |
*  3043 Learned Hall       (_/                                              *
|  University of Kansas            "Everything goes wrong all the time -    |
*  Lawrence, KS  66045                  What you do is fix it."             *

*  (913) 864-3692                                                           *
|  Disclaimer:  My opinions are my own; nobody else is even interested.     |
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